About these ads

Comic Book Fans on Facebook – May 3,2011

Bookmark and Share

Last week I launched a regular report that will look at the demographics of comic book fans on Facebook.  This weekly column will now appear on Tuesdays to coincide with the #comicmarket discussion that occurs on Twitter (seems appropriate).  For this second entry, I’ve done two things, expanded the universe examined and also grabbed the data to compare how comic book fans compare with the Facebook community as a whole.

The Methodology

Questions on how I went about gather this data left a lot of people questioning the results from the inaugural entry.  That entry was rushed, I more wanted to prove it can be done, than really going all out.  The methodology is simple, Facebook allows individuals to identify their interests/likes.  In the inaugural entry, I used nine points of interests.

This second entry sees that expanded to 28.  I’m not going to list all of them, but they are general comic book companies/publishers/lines and what I’ll call the “medium,” so manga, comic books, graphic novels, etc.  I stayed away from individual books and personalities as well as related comic book tie-ins like movies, video games and toys.  What’ll you’ll see though is as the total number of identifiers tripled, the volume increase wasn’t that much.

These statistics are also for individuals on Facebook who are marked as living in the United States.

Total United States Comic Book Fan Facebook Population = over 1,760,380 – this is the total number of people who identified themselves through these 28 items.  There are a total of 160,549,620 Facebook users who are identified as living in the United States.  That means on Facebook a little over 1% of those located in the United States are comic book fans.

Men vs. Women

There was a flaw in my original graphic, those who are “unknown.”  These people have declined to give their data.  For purposes, I’ll now include that when applicable.  Here is the first major break from the general United States statistics.  In the general US statistics, women make up the majority with 51.06% versus men at 42.39%.  Comic book fans fall into the steroetype with men dominating almost 2 to 1 at 64.14% to women at 33.12%.

Comic Fans on FacebookUnited States Facebook Population

When breaking down education you also find that comic book fans are more educated than the general populace.

5.2 Education Comic Fan

5.2 Education Facebook User

Age

The age breakdown of both comic book fans and Facebook has been greatly expanding.  Ages are now in a four year span.  Though the breakdown somewhat matches as far as the largest segments for each (18-21), that age group makes up 31.81% of the universe for comic book fans but 19.95% of Facebook users.  You’ll also notice at age 40, the number of comic book fans halves with each grouping, but there’s a more gradual decline in Facebook fans.  Almost 80% of comic book fans are under the age of 30 while just under 55% are in this age range for the general Facebook populace.

5.2 Age Comic Book Fan5.2 Age Facebook User5.2 Age Breakdown Comic Fan

5.2 Age Breakdown Facebook User

Relationship Status

By a slight majority comic book fans are “single” with 51.27% while only 33.24% of the Facebook population is.  The single population is overwhelmingly male (68.33%) while more even for the the general populace.  For comic book fans, this comes at the expense of the “married” status which is 17.77% for comic book fans and 39.4% for general Facebook users.

5.2 Relationship Comic Book Fan5.2 Relationship Facebook User5.2 Relationship Numbers Comic Fan

5.2 Relationship Numbers Facebook User

Gender Interest

There’s been some comments about what words I use for this statistic.  Facebook labels this as “interested in.”  To me this is different than orientation.  People can be “interested in” the same sex for friendship for example.  While this is an interested statistic, I don’t believe it necessarily denotes these users’ orientation.  As far as the overall percentages of what users are “interested in,” comic book fans have slightly higher percentages when it comes to same-sex.

5.2 Gender Interest Comic Fan

5.2 Gender Interest Facebook User

With this data we now have a base for future comparison.  With Free Comic Book Day and numerous movies based on comic book franchises on the horizon, we’ll see if these numbers shift at all.

Up later this week is an international edition.

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Marketing, Random

Author:Brett Schenker

Brett is a political consultant who resides in Arlington, VA. He grew up in Cleveland, OH and Buffalo, NY and attended the University at Buffalo, majoring in Political Science. Since then Brett has made his mark on politics working in various positions such as a Legislative Staffer for the Erie County Legislature, Special Assistant for Senator John Kerry, as the Database Administrator for Forward Together PAC, Deputy Internet Director for Chris Dodd for President, and Internet/Database Director for Virginians for Brian Moran, and Email Deliverability Czar for Salsa Labs. In 2007 Brett formed 5B Consulting providing his expertise on database solutions, new media and email strategy. He's a long time geek, reading comics since he was a child and learning to spell his name on an Atari 800. When he's not working, he's reading comics, playing video games and relaxing with a nice cup of tea. You can follow him on Twitter @bhschenker

Subscribe

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

8 Comments on “Comic Book Fans on Facebook – May 3,2011”

  1. AwesomeDude
    May 6, 2011 at 10:07 am #

    Yes, very interested data.

    But how did you make Facebook spit out the data? I assume you used the Developers API- but how?

    Thanks,

    • May 6, 2011 at 10:09 am #

      Nope, no API, it’s actually quite simpler than that. I don’t quite want to give that away, as that kind of ruins the “magic,” but it’s much simpler than that, anyone can do it if you know where to look and how to manipulate the interface.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. International Comic Book Fans on Facebook – May 9,2011 « Graphic Policy - May 9, 2011

    [...] can find out the general gist of how I went about getting the information in this post.  For the “international edition” I focused on just a few countries, United Kingdom, [...]

  2. Comic Book Fans on Facebook – May 10, 2011 « Graphic Policy - May 10, 2011

    [...] week we posted the second entry on our look at the demographics of comic book fans on Facebook.  You can check out the previous [...]

  3. A Fan by Any Other Name | BenjaminWoo.net - September 16, 2011

    [...] attainment, relationship status, and “gender interest” of comic fans on Facebook. In the second, he’s returned to the same statistics, but has somewhat altered his criteria for selecting his [...]

  4. More on the Facebook demographics that reveal a surprisingly number of female comics fans — The Beat - September 19, 2013

    […] first study I did imediately blew that belief of 300 to 400,000 people out of the water. I quickly found over a […]

  5. About Those Facebook Fan Studies. I Go More Into Detail on the “How” | Graphic Policy - September 19, 2013

    […] first study I did immediately blew that belief of 300 to 400,000 people out of the water. I quickly found over a […]

  6. More on the Facebook demographics that reveal a surprising number of female comics fans | - April 16, 2014

    […] first study I did imediately blew that belief of 300 to 400,000 people out of the water. I quickly found over a […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,996 other followers

%d bloggers like this: