Tag Archives: scout comics

Scout Announces Category Zero for 2019

A man-made virus infects the entire population of Earth but only a rare few possess the gene needed for it to become active. The incredible and amazing abilities the virus grants these people makes them a threat to the public’s safety. The decision is made to round them up and put them into isolation facilities. It’s only then that the world realizes how big a threat these people really are.

Category Zero was created and is written by Adem Kiamil with artwork by Ton Lima, and colors by Derek Dow. It comes to comic store shelves in 2019.

 

Brett Register’s Dust Comes from Scout in 2019

Created by Brett Register, with artwork by Zack Finfrock, Dust is a brand new comic series being published by Scout Comics in 2019.

Dust is set in the distant future where Jupiter has ignited, creating a second sun in our solar system. As a result, the polar ice caps melted and the Earth dried out. The rich and powerful have built a utopia underground to escape the harsh conditions on the surface. They call it The Echo. The rest of humanity has been left to either die or face a harsh existence in a barren, godforsaken land. They call this place… The Dust.

Scout Comics is Ready to Rise with Don Ellis Aguillo

Scout Comics has announced Rise written and drawn by Don Ellis Aguillo.

Rise is about broken, lost, splendidly dysfunctional people (is there any other kind?) who are brought together by a hope they had either lost or knew nothing of, but cling to nonetheless. Through tragic circumstances, a 9 year old girl is set to take the mantle of Queen. She will face resistance from a power-hungry aristocracy and a horde of vampiric demons, all on the brink of war.

The series will debut in 2019.

Scout Comics Announces a New Corporate Structure and Officers

Very few Indie publishers have had the explosive success that Scout Comics has enjoyed in 2018. With breakout hits like Stabbity Bunny, Long Lost, and The Mall, Scout has released an impressive lineup of comics for a new publisher. With this unprecedented growth, Scout Comics has unveiled the revolutionary new Scout Comics & Entertainment, Inc. The new structuring of Scout’s corporate landscape will include Brendan Deneen (CEO) and Tennessee Edwards (CCO), along with new additions James Pruett (COO & Publisher) and James Haick (President).

Scout Comics and Entertainment has strategically established their new corporate headquarters in one of Florida’s most charming and comic friendly cities, Fort Myers.

 

Don Handfield, James Haick III, and Scout Comics’ The Mall in Development for TV by Ivan Reitman’s Montecito Pictures

Ivan Reitman’s Montecito Pictures has picked up Don Handfield and James Haick III’s critically acclaimed comic series The Mall, published by Scout Comics. Handfield, the co-creator of History Channel’s Knightfall will adapt for the small screen through his Motor Television banner.

Set in the golden age of kiosks, arcades and food courts,The Mall tells the story of three teenagers — the QUARTERBACK, the PRINCESS and the GEEK, who all find out they’re related when their real father, a mid-level crime boss, dies and leaves them each a store inside the local mall. The catch is, the stores are fronts for the mob, and the teens must decide whether to break bad or go legit, all while trying to navigate the high stakes John Hughes type drama that is high school in the 1980s. Finding a date for the prom is one thing, doing it with the Columbian drug cartel out to kill you is another.

Handfield’s first comic series The Rift was also optioned for television and his upcoming new comic series The Source, also from Scout Comics, co-created with Joshua Malkin launches at New York Comic-Con 2018 with a limited edition glow-in-the-dark variant cover.

Haick is the creator of another successful ongoing Scout series Solar Flare, about mankind’s quest to survive after a x-class solar flare wipes out the world’s electrical infrastructure, along with the upcoming Long Live Pro Wrestling series.

Matthew Erman and Lisa Sterle’s Series Long Lost is Optioned for Television

Scout Comics and Entertainment, Inc. has announced that Long Lost, its critically-acclaimed horror/thriller series by writer Matthew Erman and artist Lisa Sterle, is now in development with writer/producer Jenny Klein. Long Lost is the haunting story of two estranged sisters who find themselves drawn back to their small southern hometown to unlock the strange mysteries there. To do so, they will have to follow multiple roads that all seemingly end with their enigmatic and secretive mother.

NYCC 2018: Scout Comics Reveals their Exclusives

Scout Comics will be offering four New York Comic Con exclusives this year. Four of Scout’s most popular titles: The Mall, Zinnober, Long Lost, and Stabbity Bunny will be featured at NYCC 2018. All exclusives will be stunning title-less printed covers on gorgeous 100lb heavy card stock.

As a special incentive, when you purchase a set of the four NYCC exclusive variants, you will receive a free “Stabbity Bunny coloring book variant” (while supplies last).

All exclusive Scout NYCC titles will be available at the Scout Comics booth #950 at NYCC 2018.

FlameCon 2018: Writers Ben Kahn and Rachel Silverstein Talk Their New Comic, Renegade Rule

FlameCon 2018 marked the debut of the creator owned comic book Renegade Rule #1. It’s a slice of life comic about an all female VR eSports team called Manhattan Mist featuring the team members Amanda, Sasha, Jessie, and Tonya. It is written by Ben Kahn (Heavenly Blues) and Rachel Silverstein, a J.D. student and member of Marvel’s Agents of GIRL with art by Sam Beck (Verse).

At the convention, I got the latest scoop from Ben Kahn and Rachel Silverstein on this exciting new book.

Graphic Policy: How did you all meet creatively and decide to work on this comic together. Ben, I know you’ve done a lot of solo books in the past so why did you want to bring on Rachel as a co-writer?

Ben Kahn: We met at the first Five Points festival last year.

Rachel Silverstein: It was totally random, and Ben was one of those hecklers, who had a table. And I walked by, and he said, “Hey, buy my comic.” And I bought the first two issue. Then, we somehow got into the topic of Judaism on Twitter, and I was in Israel at the time. Then, we kind of became friends after that.

BK: Rachel was in law school. I’ve been there when I wanted to make a comic and didn’t have the resources to sink into it, and I’m like, “Hell, let me pay it forward.” Because I had read scripts by her and knew she was an amazing writer. This will not stand if she goes out and becomes a lawyer without ever gracing the comic book pages. We’re gonna make something happen.

What does Rachel like? Girls and video games. There’s a comic there somewhere.

GP: Renegade Rule is all about video games. What has your experience been of gaming over the years?

BK: I feel like the old fogey. [in cranky old man voice] Back in my day, platformers and JRPGs ruled the land. I was into more of the single player games. I loved all these fantastical plots and worlds. I don’t really like the gameplay as much. I wish I could find a medium that only did the plots and the characterization. And then I found comics, and that was all I cared about.

I always enjoyed Halo growing up. It’s probably the biggest influence on me. I spent a lot of middle school playing Halo at a friend’s house until two in the morning.

GP: Me too.

BK: For me, with a lot of the modern games like Team Fortress, Overwatch, and Fortnite, I’m an outsider looking in. Especially the fandom element and the culture that builds around it. I’ve never played Overwatch except at [Rachel’s] house a few times. But I read all the comics, watch all the cinematics, read all the wikis. So, I was definitely intrigued at the idea of having this fun, fictional crazy world to throw on top of a sports story narrative [in Renegade Rule].

RS: For me, I would never call myself a gamer, but when Overwatch came out, I remember seeing the first posts on Tumblr of the cinematic for Widowmaker and Tracer. I was like “This looks really gay. What is it?” I thought it was a movie.

BK: Let the record show that Rachel is wearing a Pharah hat and a color matching jacket.

RS: And a D. Va backpack. I was like, “What is this?” So, I watched a lot of gameplay and thought it was really cool. I actually bought an Xbox One just so I could play Overwatch. That’s pretty much the only thing I’ve gotten into that’s relevant to Renegade Rule. When Ben wanted to make a comic with similar elements to a video game, I figured, “I can do this. I can totally do this.”

GP: Why did you guys decide to do a VR game?

BK: I just think it would be super fucking boring to have characters holding controllers for twenty pages.

RS: We also wanted it to be a little futuristic. We could add the element of them moving around and have action in it.

BK: It’s like that .hack//Sign/Ready Player One old school trope of the VR game, especially with the sports movie narrative of physicality and training. There’s a real physical element to the gameplay beyond them holding controllers.

GP: Break that whole workout scene with Amanda, the team leader, towards the end of comic because when I think of video games, I think of just sitting on the couch. But she’s pumping iron and stuff.

RS: We wanted to make it so they’re not sitting on a couch and wanted to add an element where they have to maintain their physical bodies and have the dexterity to play a video game.

BK: Because I love exercise. It’s a part of my daily routine. I went on a whole run before coming to the convention. I wanted to capture the sense of pushing yourself, and Amanda wanting to overcome her limits and being better than she is. We were trying to get the invigorating feeling of training and communicating that on the page.

GP: Renegade Rule is a self-published comic. What have been some of the challenges of doing it by yourselves?

RS: Nothing at all.

BK: Nothing unexpected. I’ve gone through the production process enough to know what it’s going to be, and our whole hope was to have issue one ready for FlameCon.

RS: Sam [Beck] really came through with that. We have to give her kudos. We never gave her a time frame to do anything. We were like “Do it at your own pace. There’s no rush”, and then we were going to be at FlameCon so let’s debut it here.

It was halfway through June, and she said she took on a few other projects. And we were like “Can you have this done by the beginning of August?”, and she did an amazing job considering the time crunch.

BK: Sam’s work on the book was so good. I look at the pages, and the colors are stunning and the atmosphere and the characters. There are some facial expressions that just make me laugh looking at them. I can’t say enough good things about Sam’s art. The girls feel like real people, and a lot of that is the way Sam brought them to life and communicated their attitudes from their fashions to their faces to the way they carry themselves. The acting she’s able to do through an image is fantastic.

GP: How were you all able to get her join Renegade Rule? Why was she the best artist for the project?

RS: We actually search on Twitter. We looked at the #VisibleWomen hashtag. I remember I saw it and sent a link to her Twitter and said, “Ben, this the artist we need. Please make this happen.” It actually worked. She was the first person we asked and was like “Okay”.  We were really lucky.

GP: I love the team name Manhattan Mist and that you named it after a character’s vape. Which member of Manhattan Mist are you, and why?

BK: We read the script out loud.

RS: We sit down to write it together. We Skype together.

BK: We’re writing every panel together. When we break down who reads what voices, Rachel reads as Amanda and Tonya, and I read for Jessie and Sasha. I feel like that’s a good breakdown personality-wise.

GP: So you treat it like a stage play.

RS: Yeah, whenever we try to think of emphasis when we bold the words for lettering, we try to read the script in different voices.

BK: We figure out the best way to read the line and then figuring out the best way to communicate that line to the reader. That’s always been a big part of my writing process. Reading the dialogue out loud and then seeing how it sounds. That’s why I’ve been kicked out of a lot of coffee shops, but I think it’s worth it for the dialogue.

RS: But to answer your question, I would definitely be a Tonya. When I had sent the PDF of Renegade Rule to one of my friends, I asked, “What are your thoughts?” And all she said back was “When you think that you’re Sasha, but really you’re Tonya.” That is so accurate. I think a lot of people would relate to that. Everyone wants to think that they’re this badass who picks up all the girls. But you’re really just the one in the bar going “I’m gonna die alone.”

GP: So relatable.

BK: I think I’ve always been more of a Jessie. I’m not quite always on the ball. “Yeah, yeah that thing we’re doing, but also that thing that has nothing to do with that relevant thing.” Jessie is all about the sloth videos.

GP: I like the romances set up in Renegade Rule #1. You’ve got Jessie and her boyfriend and Amanda with her crush on Gabby. What role will romance play in the book going forward?

BK: In sports stories, you’ve seen the rivals that launch a thousand fan fics. So, we thought what if that subtext was very textual. We want to do that love story with a rival story.

RS: We’re doing cliche. Number one enemy becomes the love interest.

BK: I think this is gonna have a few more punches to the face than the cliche love story.

RS: We have a lot of big things planned for Amanda and Gabby.

BK: It’s gonna be fun because these are two very driven, very competitive, very compassionate women that are gonna find a lot in common. Sparks and punches will fly to use my marketing poster line.

GP: Do you find writing the action/video game scenes or the slice of life scenes more enjoyable?

RS: I love the slice of life stuff.

BK: The slice of life stuff is really fun. I always love that intersection between fantastic and mundane so it feels unique to write an eight page stretch of friends hanging out at a bar. Action is fun, especially when we get to play with because what I like about having the video game motif is we get to have very epic sci-fi action visuals without having to do the whole epic sci-fi war part. Fuck it, lizard man, cyborg, and ninja that’s who they’re gonna fight this issue.

GP: Can you guys tease out any of the teams that Manhattan Mist is facing?

RS: Yes. We spent a long time coming up with teams, and we trashed a couple of them. The big thing for us was coming up with the names.

BK: Let’s see, we’ve got their Y-chromosome doppelgangers, the Nashville Banjos coming up. It’s the Mist, but with slightly relationship dynamics. They can very much get in the heads of our girls.

RS: Then, we’ve got the Brooklyn Sharpshooters, who are the best team.

BK: Their colors are purple and gold. ‘Cause even in Brooklyn, it’s totally not a take on the L.A. Lakers. One thing I like, starting in issue two, is the differing play styles and the philosophy behind it. There’s the Santa Fe Shinobi, who represent regimented training in all areas. It’ll be fun putting that up against a bunch of friends and that mess around, have fun play style of the Manhattan Mist.

GP: I have one last question. Ben, you have the Heavenly Blues trade coming out from Scout Comics in December. Why should fans of Renegade Rule pick up Heavenly Blues?

RS: Why shouldn’t they?

BK: So, the basic plot of Heavenly Blues is about a group of thieves in Hell from throughout history, who team up to pull the ultimate heist on Heaven. If you like a team full of chaotic scoundrels who come together to be more than the sum of their parts going up against impossible odds and pulling off an impossible job, Heavenly Blues is the book for you. Also, it has weaponized gay kissing. I guess if you can’t imagine that you’re just gonna have to buy the book.

Buy a physical copy of Renegade Rule #1 on Etsy.

Follow Ben Kahn on Twitter.

Follow Rachel Silverstein on Twitter.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Paul

Top Pick: Fantastic Four #1 (Marvel) – FINALLY! Fantastic Four was the first comic book I ever read and it ignited my passion for comic books. I collected this title for years and was crushed when it was cancelled. I am beyond excited that Marvel’s first family is coming back and I can’t wait to read their new adventures.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Sandman Universe #1 (Vertigo/DC Comics) – This is it, the return of the classic comic universe! I can’t say I ever read the originals, but I’m fascinated to see what this new entry is like and the new series spinning out of this universe.

Black Badge #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins alone are draws for this new series.

Farmhand #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue was weird in all the right ways where a farm now grows human parts. Funny in so many ways, this is one that’s just strange enough to keep us intrigued.

Hot Lunch Special #1 (AfterShock Comics) – I couldn’t tell you a single thing about what this series is about. I just know writer Eliot Rahal is writing it and since he consistently entertains me, I’m excited to check it out.

Long Live Pro Wrestling #0 (Scout Comics) – Wrestling in comics is becoming a big thing again and this one sounds unique as it follows a former wrestler turned talk show host which sounds like it could stand out.

Mech Cadet Yu #11 (BOOM! Studios) – I love this seres of kids piloting giant mechs fighting off aliens. This isn’t the issue to start but I will constantly recommend this series.

Oblivion Song by Kirman and De Felici #6 (Skybound Entertainment/Image Comics) – This sci-fi series stands out not for the concept/aliens, but the focus on the impact of a catastrophic event. There’s an exploration of PTSD and trauma that’s subtle (and some times not so much) but something we just don’t see in comics much today.

Outpost Zero #2 (Skybound Entertainment/Image Comics) – The first issue was the tense build up of a disaster film. A little mix of a lot of concepts, the center of it all is key, grown up kids who are experiencing it all in their own way. An interesting enough first issue I’m excited to check out the second.

Transformers: Lost Light #22/Transformers: Optimus Prime #22/Transformers: Unicron #3 (IDW Publishing) – The three series come together to deal with the threat that us Unicron. While some are a bit behind the main story, they’re all important in their own way and the bigger picture that’s happening is amazing. This is years of storyline finally converging to one big event and who knows what will happen when it’s all over.

 

Joe

Top Pick: Fantastic Four #1 (Marvel) – The first family of comics is back! It’s long overdue, I mean even DC formed The Terrifics in their absence with a different but in the same mold as our science loving explorers. So pumped to see what Slott and company has in store.

The Sandman Universe #1 (Vertigo/DC Comics) – Another classic and beloved series returns this week. I have high hopes for this book and the four ongoing series it will kick off. It’s Gaiman’s world, we just play in it!

Plastic Man #3 (DC Comics) – While I wish this was an ongoing, I am still looking forward to every issue. It’s such ridiculous fun and mystery.

Superman #2 (DC Comics) – Let’s see what Bendis and company has in store as these issues pile up. I enjoyed both starts to this and Action, and am hopeful the momentum continues. Great start so far.

The Amazing Spider-Man #3 (Marvel) – Spencer and Ottley have done a great job with the first two issues, and I am loving the story with The Lizard, and the school. I can’t wait as the rogues gallery grows, because to me, much like Batman, that’s when Spidey is at its best.

Review: The Mall #1

To put things simply, Scout Comics’ The Mall #1 is The Breakfast Club meets Goodfellas complete with three very different teenagers going not to Saturday detention, but meeting with Lenny, the brother of dead crime boss, Gino Cardini and each of their fathers. Except with some shared characters and the concept of the children of a dead crime boss running his mall mob fronts, The Mall #1 doesn’t line up plotwise with the Free Comic Book Day issue. However, writers Don Handfield and James Haick III, artist Rafael Loureiro, and colorist Dijjo Lima make a solid effort at combining the worlds of the crime saga and coming of age story with more than a little darkness along the way.

In the three protagonists Diego, Lena, and Dallas, Handfield and Haick riff off the archetypes of Brain, Rich Girl, and Jock, but The Mall #1 doesn’t fall into the lily white John Hughes movie trap and features a diverse cast of characters. Handfield and Haick also use the archetypes as a foundation to build on instead of leaning into stereotypes. For example, Lena might live in a huge mansion, but wants to have a job (Even if it’s selling hot dogs at the mall food court.) so she can build a life for her and her mother apart from her stepfather, who sexually abuses her. She is fiercely independent and has a soft spot for animals, which is why Lenny gives her the pet store to manage. The panels of her holding cute puppies are a nice relief from the violence, bullying, and racism and homophobia that pervade The Mall #1 because, hey, people are pretty terrible.

Diego is the “geek” of the unlikely trio, but has poor grades because he works at his dad’s window washing business to help ends meet, which cuts into his studying time and also causes his peers to bully him. He daydreams about a better life where kids don’t make fun of him and hurl racist slurs at him, and this causes him to lash out at his hardworking father. With a talent for music, Diego has potential, but his family doesn’t have money to send him to a more advanced school for more opportunities. This whole idea of class and opportunity is at the core of Dallas’ character, who is a football playing “jock”, but he is a backup for now and can’t afford expensive cleats without shoplifting them. He is transferring to another school to have a bigger shot at getting a college scholarship, but the kids in his neighborhood resent this and beat him up giving him bruises in a punishing sequence from Rafael Loureiro.

Don Handfield and James Haick imbue these pretty one dimensional high school movie stereotype with an awareness of class and race in The Mall #1 and then add the mob elements. Unlike the Free Comic Book Day issue, Handfield and Haick almost immediately throw Diego, Lena, and Dallas into a world of guns and rivalries as Lenny is threatened by a homophobic member of another rival gang. In some of Handfield and Haick’s harshest writing, he basically uses Reagan era AIDS rhetoric against his opponent, but before the teens can settle into setting up their mall stores, they are drawn into a fire fight. Loureiro’s panels tilt, his art is more stylized, and Dijjo Lima’s color palette is more intense to show the brave new world that these teens are in. This isn’t an after school job or scholarship program; this is war.

In The Mall #1, Handfield, Haick, and Loureiro do a good job introducing its three main characters, its high concept coming of age meets mob movie premise, and then throws everyone into the deep end after taking its time getting to the gangster stuff. It will be interesting to see each protagonist’s reaction to the violent world that they have been thrown into, and the best part of this book is the three distinct viewpoints on the world given to Diego, Lena, and Dallas. They certainly have plenty of problems, and even before the crime family angle is introduced, The Mall #1 has an ugly, harsh take on the world with cheerleaders forced to give oral sex in return for shopping sprees, friends beating up friends because they are betraying the neighborhood, and Lena getting sexually assaulted by her stepfather.

Story: Don Handfield and James Haick III Art: Rafael Loureiro
Colors: Dijjo Lima Letters: DC Hopkins
Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.7 Recommendation: Read

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

« Older Entries