Category Archives: Reviews

Review: Secret Weapons #3

SW_003_COVER-A_ALLEN“Class is in session, and Amanda McKee – the machine-wielding hero codenamed Livewire – is here to show her unconventional class of recruits what it really takes to master power. And lesson number-one is…teamwork! But as these once-abandoned psiot castaways put their pain behind them to become a fully functioning unit, an even deadlier set of challenges will soon rise to meet them…”

If you haven’t read the first two issues in this four issue miniseries, and you’re thinking of starting here, don’t. I mean, you could, but why bother? Eric Heisserer has written such a compelling story that it would be a shame to start here.

Secret Weapons feels like an updated version of the X-Men, a comic that truly focuses on the trials and tribulations of a group of young misfits with some almost useless powers, only they’re not called mutants here, but psiots; one can talk to birds, one can conjure things (with no control over what he conjures) and one can turn into pure marble. Only he can’t move when he does so. The series thus far has gone from strength to strength as we’ve been introduced to the misfit central characters, had a cameo or two from the wider Valiant universe (which you don’t need to  be familiar with to enjoy the series), as well as slowly introducing the villain proper last issue.
SW_003_005This issue sees Avichal Malakar, the statue powered psiot, trying to live his life way from the others only to face hostility from the public – not because as a Sikh he wears a turban, but because he’s a psiot. Without giving too much regarding the content of the comic away, things turn from bad to worse for Avi in a reflection of some of the recent real world issues without ever slapping you in the face with the comparison. Heisserer is a newcomer to comics, but you wouldn’t think it reading this issue – it is quite simply one of the best issues I’ve read all year, and incredibly relevant.

The art, by Raul Allen with Patricia Martin (who also letters the comic), is visually arresting. Allen’s use of the grid shows a level of visual story telling that perfectly complements the writing. I am a huge fan of Allen and Martin’s work, even though I was only introduced to their art with Wrath Of The Eternal Warrior (I say “they” because I’m not quite sure where one’s contribution ends and the other begins with the art. Ultimately, when it looks this good, I’m not as worried as I should be), and to get to see them firing on all cylinders with this issue is a complete treat.

I honestly thought that the best comic I’d read all week would be Divinity #0. I am happy to say that I was wrong in thinking that. Heisserer, Allen and Martin are one issue away from giving us a multi layered story that will stand among the best of the year.

This is where I add a cliched “if you’re not reading this…” statement where I try and push you into reading Valiant comics. But honestly? You don’t need to be familiar with Valiant to appreciate just how good this is. Don’t ignore this series – it’s absolutely fantastic.

Story: Eric Heissera Art: Raul Allen with Patricia Martin
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommedation: Buy

Although Valiant provided a FREE copy to review, I read the issue I picked up from my LCS.

Weekly Graphic Novel Review: WWE Vol. 1 Redesign. Rebuild. Reclaim.

This Tuesday saw a release of a new trade from BOOM! Studios. We’re discussing the first volume of BOOM! Studios’ WWE comic series.

WWE Vol. 1 Redesign. Rebuild. Reclaim. collects issues #1-4 and the WWE: Then. Now. Forever. special by writer Dennis Hopeless, artist Serge Acuña, and cover artist Dan Mora.

The comic is in comic book stores and book stores today.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

WWE Vol. 1 Redesign. Rebuild. Reclaim.
Amazon or TFW

 

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

DC Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps.

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps Vol. 3 Quest for Hope collects issues #14-21 by Robert Venditti, Ethan Van Sciver, V Kenneth Marion, Dexter Vines, Rafael Sandoval, Jordi Tarragona.

The trade is in comic stores today August 16 and book stores August 22.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps Vol. 3 Quest for Hope
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFW

 

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Sh*t My President Says

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump by Shannon Wheeler.

The comic is in comic book stories today.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Sh*t My President Says: The Illustrated Tweets of Donald J. Trump
Amazon or Kindle or comiXology or TFAW

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: The Sandman Special #1

SandmanSpecialCoverBetween the Sandman with the gas mask and gun and the Gothic, critically acclaimed one, there was the red and yellow superhero suit wearing Sandman created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby in 1974. In a pair of stories, DC Comics creators both old and new show the imaginative potential of this superhero and his unwilling, monstrous assistants Brute and Glob. First, Dan Jurgens, Jon Bogdanove, and Madpencil tell a heartwarming story with a great twist ending about a young boy whose vivid dreams of monsters and superheroes threaten to break out of the dream world and into reality. Then, there is Steve Orlando, Rick Leonardi, Dan Green, and Steve Buccelato’s slightly wilder tale of the now adult Jed Walker, a supporting character in Sandman, battling his childhood nightmares with a cameo from basically the Grim Reaper. The comic is rounded out by a collection of two page “Strange Stories of the DNA Project” from Jack Kirby’s Fourth World stories.

What initially drew me to The Sandman Special was Jon Bogdanove’s uncanny ability to make his art look like Jack Kirby’s while using modern techniques like photo collages to show the surrealness of the young boy’s dream world.  I wish DC Comics put him on more projects. There is weight to Sandman’s throws and punches, and Madpencil cooks up an old school color palette straight out of the 1970s, like a smooth orange take on the classic Kirby krackle. Even though it has banter, punching, a sick team-up move from Sandman and Brute, and a tentacle monster that gets handily defeated, Jurgens and Bogdanove’s story is more metafictional than a straight up superhero adventure ending in a final panel that may make you cry.

Sandmaninterior

Through action and a couple heart rending Jurgens monologues towards the end, The Sandman Special looks at the important of embracing our fears and weaknesses through the dream monsters and then facing and defeating them as symbolized by the young boy’s superhero, who is an amalgamation of Kirby’s takes on Thor, Orion, and a little bit of Captain America. The battle between Sandman and the young boy’s nightmare monsters is also a wonderful tribute to Jack Kirby’s career where he would switch from drawing superheroes to monsters and vice versa from his first work at DC and Marvel in the early 1940s to his later work in the 1970s and 1980s. And sometimes monsters could be heroes, like the ever loving blue eyed Thing, which is why it’s nice to see Bogdanove homage Fantastic Four #1 in one of his panels and have the monster that Sandman fights talk and have feelings.

Unlike the lead story, which quickly establishes Sandman’s kooky status quo with a double page spread, Orlando, Leonardi, and Green rely on previous knowledge of the character of Jed Walker and his grandfather Ezra from Kirby’s Sandman. I vaguely remember Jed from the “Game of You” arc from Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, but luckily the story kicks up a notch when Sandman, Brute, and Glob end up fighting the angel of death in cowboy form Psychopomp on train while looking for a dream about Jed’s grandfather to scare away his now adult nightmares.

Orlando doesn’t really establish Jed as a character except his constant nightmares and that he left his unwelcoming hometown and only returned for his grandfather’s funeral so the big emotional moment isn’t as powerful as it could be. But he does make a human connection to Jed’s nightmares, which are about the fact that he didn’t spend enough time with his grandfather while he was alive. On a more fun note, the banter between Sandman, Brute, and Glob keeps the story from getting too doom and gloom as they sneak and mess around with Psychopomp. Also, I liked that Dan Green used a grittier, inking style for Jed in the “real world” and his feelings of guilt and a cleaner one for Sandman and his more traditional punching and magic whistle blowing heroism. The design for Psychopomp is also a perfect bridge from Jack Kirby’s Sandman to Neil Gaiman’s.

The second story leans too much on previous reader knowledge, but Sandman Special is a fantastic tribute to the well-designed (Both Madpencil and Steve Buccelato make that red and yellow costume pop), filled to the brim with imagination Sandman of the 1970s. It also shows the literal power of dreams to craft limitless opportunities for storytelling

Story: Dan Jurgens, Steve Orlando Art: Jon Bogdanove, Rick Leonardi with Dan Green
Colors: Madpencil, Steve Buccelato

Story: 7.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dark Nights: Metal #1

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Dark Nights: Metal #1!

Dark Nights: Metal is by Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion, and FCO Plascencia.

The comic is in comic book stories today.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Dark Nights: Metal #1
Amazon or Kindle or comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Divinity #0

DIVINITY_ZERO_COVER-A_RYP“DIVINITY, a lost Russian cosmonaut newly returned to Earth with god-like powers, has successfully restored the world to order after the reality-altering event known as the Stalinverse. But how can a man – even one with near-divine abilities – know for certain that the planet has been truly restored in full? To make sure, Divinity must bear witness to the world as it now stands – heroes, villains, gods, and all – to ensure the rightful order of the Valiant Universe!”

One of the most exciting new characters to come out of any publisher in the last few years is Valiant’s Divinity. A Russian cosmonaut, real name Abram Adams, who ended up with reality warping powers that make gods look like ants, all Divinity wants is to be left alone in peace. There have been twelve issues of Divinity released so far divided into three separate miniseries (I, II and III), with each telling a beautiful and compelling story that, for the most part stood alone in the Valiant universe up until III reimagined the world as we know it for four issues at the hands of another god like Russian cosmonaut (there were three on the initial mission).

Which brings us to Divinity #0. Written by Matt Kindt with art by Renato Guedes, the comic genuinely does provide a fantastic introduction into the Divinity story without giving too much away should you decide to pick up the collected editions if you haven’t read the previous issues, but the zero issue also provides a very interesting direction for the future, and where Kindt will be taking the story next.

Without beating around the bush, this comic is absolutely beautiful. Guedes fully painted each page, and oh boy does it pay off. I could spend three or four hundred words describing it… but why bother when I won’t do the art any justice, and Valiant have provided us with some preview images?

DIVINITY_ZERO_002See what I mean? The entire comic looks just like this, and Dave Lanphear‘s lettering brings out the very best in the art, whilst allowing Kindt’s words to flow seamlessly from the page in what has to be the finest example of a single issue comic from Valiant this year. When each page is a work of art that brings a genuinely excellent story to life you can’t ask for more from a creative team.

This is an utterly brilliant comic in every way.

Story: Matt Kindt Art: Renato Guedes Letters: Dave Lanphear
Story: 9.0 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review. I’ll be buying this Wednesday as well.

Back to School: Ultimate Spider-Man #22-23

Back to School is a weekly issue by issue look at the beloved superhero teen comic Ultimate Spider-ManIn this week’s installment, I will be covering Ultimate Spider-Man #22-23  (2002) written by Brian Michael Bendis, penciled by Mark Bagley, inked by Art Thibert, and colored by Digital Transparency

Ultimate Spider-Man #22 kicks off with a nice cold open as Spider-Man tracks down some roller skating purse snatchers and easily defeats them before he has to rush back to science class. This is because he’s still grounded, and his lunch period at school is the only time he can be a superhero. He and Mary Jane have a very animated conversation about his grounding and his battle against Kraven the Hunter and Dr. Octopus ending in a joke about kissing underneath the bleachers and the surprise return of Harry Osborn. Harry is excited to see Mary Jane and Peter and invites him over to have dinner with his apparently not-dead father. The limo that Norman Osborn sends for Peter impresses Aunt May so much that she puts his grounding on hold for a night. However, this dinner is very much a trap as Peter and Harry go from chatting about girl to Norman telling Peter that he needs to stop being Spider-Man and transforming into a new, improved Green Goblin, who is verbal and can glow fire.

Ultimate Spider-Man #23 goes a little non-linear opening with Spider-Man freaking out about the Green Goblin and flashing back to Norman Osborn saying he keeps Harry docile with hypnotherapy and showing Peter up and close and personal his transformation from the Green Goblin back to Osborn. He also threatens to kill Aunt May and Mary Jane if Spider-Man doesn’t do as he’s told. Then, they watch Harry and Norman’s Dateline interview where they pin the attack on Oscorp on the now dead Justin Hammer, which is Norman Osborn’s lying reason for coming back to the public sphere. This causes Peter to freak out and run home where he has a touching conversation with Aunt May about how he had a bad time at the Osborns and feels bad lying to her. May chalks up his lies to him feeling nervous about his first girlfriend, and Peter is about to tell Mary Jane about what went down at the Osborns when Gwen Stacy knocks on his door. She has nowhere to stay because her dad’s working all night, and her mother has left them. Aunt May lets Gwen stay over and makes her and Peter eggs and has a nice chat with John Stacy in the morning. At school, things are a little weird, and the issue ends with the “grief counselor” Miss Bradley talking to Peter frankly about his life as Spider-Man and Norman Osborn’s new Green Goblin form. It’s implied she works for SHIELD.

In Ultimate Spider-Man #22-23, the opening issues of the “Legacy” story arc, Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Bagley, and Art Thibert show that Norman Osborn is scary apart from his Green Goblin persona. He is a master manipulator who uses a lethal cocktail of gaslighting (He tells Harry that his mother’s death warped his perception of reality.) and hypnotherapy disguised as regular therapy to keep his son Harry compliant. This manipulation extends to the Parker family as Peter accepts his dinner invite even though he is extremely uncomfortable meeting with someone who tried to kill him and greets him with video clips of his last battle with Dr. Octopus. Bagley draws Norman Osborn as towering over Peter like some kind of stern, well-built father figure, and Thibert goes to town on the thick, dark inks on his face. He isn’t off the wall crazy like he was in the first arc of Ultimate Spider-Man with every move, media interview, and threatening word carefully calculated. Osborn’s transformation to the Green Goblin is still monstrous and Hulk-like, but he has power over it. This combination of brains, brawn, and general sociopathy easily make “Green Goblin 2.0” Spider-Man’s most formidable foe yet because if Peter suits up to fight him, his loved ones could die.

In contrast to Norman Osborn’s manipulative bastard of a parent, Aunt May exhibits a more even measured and empathetic approach  to parenting in Ultimate Spider-Man #23. She cares about both Peter’s well-being and privacy providing a listening ear and warm hug after he returns early from the Osborns and even goes easy on him with the whole grounding thing. On paper, that might make her sound like a pushover, or a move from Bendis to give Peter more time with Mary Jane or as Spider-Man. However, the intensely detailed close-up art of Peter and May tells a different story showing Peter as a vulnerable young man, who needs support in a world where powerful, evil men want to kill him.

May’s empathy also extends to the Stacy family, and she sees John as a good-hearted man and honest cop, who is in over his head with the whole single parent thing, especially when that daughter is the firebrand Gwen. She goes from almost lecturing Peter about having a girl over to putting on her house coat and whipping up some tasty eggs for everyone because even the Ultimate Universe Aunt May slays at making breakfast. Gwen popping in on Peter in his basement while he’s wearing his boxer shorts and giving him an attack hug right in front of MJ does make Mary Jane slightly jealous although Gwen’s line of “Hold on to this one, M.J. Solid gold.” assuages her fears a little bit. Bagley tilts Mary Jane’s last panel in Ultimate Spider-Man #23 as Peter gets sent to the principal’s office, and this silent image shows how uneasy she feels about him being Spider-Man, his grounding, and the whole Gwen Stacy showing up at his house in the middle of the night.

Before this awkwardness and the whole return of Norman Osborn drama, Bendis and Bagley give Peter and Mary Jane some fantastic romantic chemistry turning the middle part of Ultimate Spider-Man #22 into a scene from a teen comedy. (Their chat at the football bleachers is yet another example of Marc Webb taking a scene featuring Peter and MJ from Ultimate Spider-Man and using it for Peter and Gwen.) Bagley shows their budding romance through body language and positioning as Mary Jane is glued to him for seven straight pages while they discuss his superhero fight and the overall suckiness of his grounding. He does close-up of Mary Jane’s eyes when Peter talks about how he wants to respect his aunt and not have her sneak over, and it makes you feel really bad for them although Peter definitely deserved his punishment. And they have a shared moment of happiness when Harry makes his big return that is kind of overshadowed by some really juvenile gay jokes about Flash Thompson even though it’s nice to see his toxic masculinity and objectification of women (See panels where he’s pawing at Liz Allen.) taken down a peg.

Usually, Bendis and Bagley are on the same page with the quick fire dialogue and easy to follow panels featuring characters’ faces and big body movement with some speed lines to spice up action sequences. However, they really drop the ball in a fairly crucial double page spread in Ultimate Spider-Man #23 where Harry, Peter, and Norman watch Norman Osborn’s big comeback interview. Thematically, it’s cool to see yet another villain manipulate the press and spin the events of the “Double Trouble” arc in a way that makes him look like the victim unlike Justin Hammer’s inept attempts at lying to the media. However, the reading order of the page goes left to right, right to left, and some horrific panels of Peter sweating and freaking out stuck under a wall of text. Norman’s rise to power, and Peter’s return to powerless is trapped under an onslaught of a couple pages of really bad storytelling. Luckily, Bendis and Bagley salvage things with the Gwen Stacy subplot and an incredibly trippy SHIELD (without saying those words) cliffhanger showing that the Spider-Man vs. Green Goblin isn’t just a mere grudge match, but affects the big picture of superhumans in the United States.

However, Ultimate Spider-Man #22-23 don’t fall into the trap of the “interconnected universe” like Iron Man 2, and Norman Osborn works as a villain because of his personal connection with Peter, who is in a way his son because he got his powers from his Oz formula. Norman also still admires his scientific mind and intellect that was much greater than his biological son Harry, who he sees as weak and spoiled so he makes him docile with hypnotherapy. Spider-Man doesn’t fight the Green Goblin in any of these issues, but the fact that he can be Norman Osborn, ruthless and corrupt businessman, and a more powerful version of the Green Goblin definitely increases his threat level. As both Norman and the Goblin, he towers over Peter and taunts him with his new powers. Like the Kingpin in the second arc of Ultimate Spider-Man, this is a man, who thinks he’s untouchable, and he might be able to back it up with those creepy flame abilities.

After “Double Trouble” introduced three villains (Two were jokes, to be honest.) in rapid succession, Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley go for a more focused approach in “Legacy”, which is influenced by the classic Spider-Man/Green Goblin stories of the late-1960s when Harry Osborn was a drug addict. They use the board clearing plot of the last arc to pave the way for Norman Osborn’s triumphant return and immediately put Peter on the defensive spoiling the return of his friend Harry. A villain with the Hulk-like brawn of the Ultimate Green Goblin and the mind of Norman Osborn is much more formidable one than the non-verbal Green Goblin that appeared in the first arc of Ultimate Spider-Man, and it’s exciting to see Peter cope with a foe that knows the people he cares about. And speaking of those people, Bendis and Bagley are careful to include scenes with Mary Jane, Aunt May, and even friend/potential love interest/general wild card Gwen Stacy, and with his grounding in Ultimate Spider-Man #22, there is plenty of time for interactions and character development.

With the exception of a goose egg of a double page spread in Ultimate Spider-Man #23, Ultimate Spider-Man #22-23 is a fantastic start to the “Legacy” arc with Brian Michael Bendis and Mark Bagley setting up Norman Osborn as Spider-Man’s physical and intellectual superior. It’s also nice to see a genuine heart to heart between Peter and Aunt May as well as the slow build romance between Peter and Mary Jane, which gets complicated by his double life, grounding, and the return of Harry Osborn.

Review: Heretics: The Wondrous (and Dangerous) Beginnings of Modern Philosophy

Heretics: The Wondrous (and Dangerous) Beginnings of Modern PhilosophyThe world is consumed by philosophy in one way or the other. Every world leader and leader of industry has either read, studied, and modeled their leadership approach after some “school of thought”. A lot of these concepts came from some thinkers were often ahead of their time. Many of these philosophers were not thought of as geniuses until after their time on this earth.

New Ideas are encouraged and even celebrated now, but it has ot always been this way. Names like Galileo and Descartes, have lead the way in how we view the human condition, especially Descartes and the “duality of man.”. What many people fail to realize or forget to remember, is that their way of thinking was so far ahead of their time that it was not only unpopular but often meant misfortune for most these brilliant minds. In Steven and Ben Nadler’s Heretics, they venture to tell the stories of these brave minds.

Their book starts off with one of the most controversial concepts, by Giordano Bruno, who was the first to devise that the Earth was not the center of the universe. Then it delves into every controversial concept throughout the 17th century crisscrossing all over Europe, enlightening the world to different men, who introduced controversial and different concepts that were often deemed dangerous. The introduction of these ideas often excommunication, and even death, and yet every one of these men stood tall, despite knowing the possible consequences. By Book’s end the reader has a full understanding of each of these philosophers, some relying on divine providence, and others, faith in their beliefs

Overall, an excellent book which gives the reader a concise and chronological history of philosophy from the 17th century. The story by Seven Nadler, is definitely written with passion, as his love for these subjects shine through every panel. The art by Ben Nadler, is vibrant and gorgeous. Altogethe,r an great book, that even if you don’t like philosophy, will still feel the subjects of this book.

Story: Steven Nadler Art: Ben Nadler
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Food Porn Anthology

Food Porn AnthologyWhen it comes to erotica and comics, most readers are too shy to venture into this realm, because of the subject matter. Sex Criminals, from Image, has been successful throughout the mainstream audience because sex is used as a plot device versus being the narrative. Sex, from Image as well, is more direct, as it tackles some sex and lifestyle related questions to versions of some well-known characters. Both examples, still never quite “puts their foot” totally in the water, but the recent anthology, Food Porn, doesn’t always only not shy away, from the subject matter it full on embraces it, sensuality and all intermixed with the insatiability of food.

Food Porn Anthology, the sizable tome is divided into “savory,” ” sweet” and “sweet and savory” sections, signaling the reader of just what type of food to expect from each tale. In the first story “Following Directions,” a couple tries a new recipe, which unexpectedly gives way to a demon who unlocks all their secret desires, for sex and food. In “Safe Harbor,” a local fisherman, finds a merman and a merwoman, and has quite a ravenous time with them both.  In “Food Talk,” a couple where one is new to a transition, renew their love through food and ultimately through sex. In ‘Quick Distraction,” one half of a couple struggles to cook dinner by themselves for the first time, while the other watches on and criticizes, until the other decides to turn the tables and turn the other one on. In “The Lion and The Lamb,” a couple hilariously describes a recipe while making love.

In “Knead and Rise,” an elvish couple decides to some morning fun when the local delivery woman stops by their bakery earlier than expected, and joins in the fun. In” Breakfast In Bed,” two chefs, who just so happen to be a couple, one half decides to make breakfast for them every morning, until the other stops and tells her boyfriend that she wants something just as much, sex in the morning. In “Complex Spice,” A girlfriend comes home from a trip, terribly missing her boyfriend and his cooking, which turns into an orgy of food ad sex between them. In “Overload,” a demon stops an intruder which turns into a wild sex romp which involves a whole lot of chocolate.

In “A La Mode,” a woman and her robot boyfriend, recreate their own version of that infamous scene from When Harry Met Sally. In “Raspberry Heart,” a man must have sex to fight gelatinous chocolate mousse monster, in this funny story. In “A Little Different,” a couple while enjoying food, decides to switch roles in their sex life for one night, leading to unbridled passion being unleashed. In “Nectar,” a demon couple indulges in some nectar and in a threesome. In “Crumble,” a couple who engages in S&M, decides to engage in some breakfast and some role play. In “Seaside Sweethearts,” a couple having a picnic for breakfast enjoy their food and each other. In “Red Summer,” a crush at an open-air market turns from a love of pomegranates to a love for each other. In “Red Bean Buns,” while working on a recipe, endlessly tease other, before finally indulging into sex. In the last story “The Munchies,” an intense craving for food lead a couple to having some afternoon delight.

Overall, a fun and amatory book that does not shy away of voracious appetites people have for food and sex, as it a true celebration of sex positivity. The stories contained are all funny, sexy, and relatable. The art by al the artists, each beautiful and complement the stories well. Altogether, an excellent tribute to food and sex in all its glory.

Story: Aero Zero, Apollo Pop, Ariel Vittori, Aud Koch, Blue Delliquanti, Boltplum, Crystal Jayme, Dechanique, Dumpling Heart, Gina Biggs, Jamie Jennings, Jess Fink, Kickingshoes, Kori Michele, Megan Gedris, Molly Ostertag, Niki Smith, S.W. Searle, Tessa Woodis, Tsukiyono
Art: Aero Zero, Apollo Pop, Ariel Vittori, Aud Koch, Blue Delliquanti, Boltplum, Crystal Jayme, Dechanique, Dumpling Heart, Gina Biggs, Jamie Jennings, Jess Fink, Kickingshoes, Kori Michele, Megan Gedris, Molly Ostertag, Niki Smith, S.W. Searle, Tessa Woodis, Tsukiyono
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

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