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Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #23

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Our Stories Carried Us Here: A Graphic Novel Anthology

Green Card Voices gathers 10 stories about immigration and shines a light on it and the refugee experience.

Story: Zaynab Abdi, Aziz Kamal, Craig Moodie, Karelin, Ruth Mekoulom, Alex Tsipenyuk, Zurya Anjum, Sergio Cenoch, Mary Anne Quiroz, Vy Luong, Amara Solomon Kamara
Art: Ashraf El-Attar, sunshine gao, Ana Hinojosa, Mike Centeno, Hop (Guy Bertin “BG” Beyem Gouong, Sandjock Likine
, Gerard Nyunai Ngan), Tom Kaczynski, Toufic El Rassi, Camilo Aguirre, Cori Nakamura Lin, Hamid Ibrahim, Kugali Team

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 09/18/2021

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Eternals: Thanos Rises #1 (Marvel)– Only in comics can you have a prehistoric battle between immortal beings astride dinosaurs and a Platonic dialogue all under the same covers as Kieron Gillen, Dustin Weaver, and Matthew Wilson show the ideological and physical roots of one of pop culture’s greatest villains, Thanos, in Eternals: Thanos Rises #1. The conflict at the core of this issue, and honestly at the Eternals as a whole in Gillen’s run, is if immortal beings whose goal is to defend a kind of status quo (the machine) can change even in the slightest way. This way is having children, and as one can guess, it doesn’t turn out great. Weaver and Wilson’s visuals bring the power and mythic quality of the best Jack Kirby stories while having their own unique and slightly askew approach to storytelling. They’re influenced by the King and not a cover band for him. Also, it’s just plain cool and additive to the whole vibe of the Eternals to have characters based on the ancient Greek pantheon partake in the very ancient Greek activity of a philosophical dialogue. Eternals: Thanos Rises #1 adds context and scope to Kieron Gillen’s work on Eternals and features him, Weaver, and Wilson working in an epic mode. Overall: 9.4 Verdict: Buy

Black’s Myth #3 (Ahoy)– Strummer and Ben’s hunt for their client’s missing silver bullets (Apparently they were forged from the 30 pieces of silver that Judas received for betraying his Lord and Savior, but you know how there things are.) takes them to many interesting destinations, including a vampire bar and occult bookstore that’s more than meets the eye. Eric Palicki and Wendell Cavalcanti keep the action and mystery going at a nice clip lulling readers into a false sense of security before escalating the plot with a wallop in the last few pages. Also, Calvacanti gets to show off his fight sequence chops and channels Frank Miller and Klaus Janson in a nine panel grid vampire beatdown that shows that Strummer still has a relish for violence and is more werewolf than detective. In Black’s Myth #3, the pace never drags, the patter is always snappy, and Eric Palicki and Wendell Cavalcanti really up the danger quotient. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Joker #7 (DC)– The shape of the conspiracy that Jim Gordon’s up against starts to slowly reveal itself in Joker #7 by James Tynion, Guillem March, and Arif Prianto. Like most issues of Joker, the book features multiple settings, narrators, and POVs as well as art styles from March, who does a James Bond/Avengers homage with Julia Pennyworth to tight grids and reflections in eye glasses as Gordon meets a potential new ally. He can get as much tension from a conversation as a silent martial arts fight aka Cassandra Cain in action. Joker #7 also features smart commentary about how the rest of the world sees Gotham (It hides social issues under masks and costumes.) and character moment payoffs like Pennyworth beating the shit out of some Bane theme park investors as payback for the villain killing her father back in the Tom King Batman run. One of the reveals that Tynion pulls is a little obvious (If keeping with his history on the Bat-family books), but I love the layered storyline he’s creating in this book that goes beyond a simple cat and mouse game. The Punchline backup from James Tynion, Sam Johns, and Sweeney Boo is quite entertaining as Harper Row tries to break out of prison creating an opportunity for clever layouts and a sense of urgency in that story’s plot. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra (IDW)– Mary Kenney, SL Gallant, Maria Keane, and Adam Guzowski turn in a celebration of the Queen of the Monsters in the one-shot Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra. Before the titular battle, Kenney does a good job fleshing out this comic’s protagonist, Mima, a photographer who’s supposed to be doing a puff piece on the Japanese military and ends up learning about Mothra’s captivity attempting to free her. Like the best kaiju stories, Godzilla Rivals: Vs. Mothra ends up being a parable about how humanity cages nature and what we don’t understand instead of being curious like Mina, whose photojournalism career came out of a life time exploring the great outdoors with her parent. All is this is great, but Godzilla Rivals: vs. Mothra also has a curb stomp monster action courtesy of Gallant and Keane as Kenney shuts off the dialogue and captions and “lets them fight”. There is really clever use of Mothra’s cocoon and Godzilla’s nuclear breath, and the entire story ends up being a little bittersweet. This comic is a must-read if you like your kaiju fights with a side of emotional resonance. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy

Trial of Magneto #2 (Marvel)– Leah Williams, Lucas Werneck, and Edgar Delgado are back for another round of bombastic drama, action, and questionable morality. Trial of Magneto #2 adds the Avengers to the mix to complicate the murder investigation and also show how much Wanda Maximoff meant to the team as they share grief and space with the Krakoans. However, not everything is sunshine and daisies, and we get yet another Magneto vs. everyone fight scene like the previous issue. But Williams and Werneck switch things up by letting Northstar be angry when his husband Kyle is caught in the middle of things and is treated as less than by Magneto. Throw in an utterly chaotic last few pages plus couple moments that show how utterly morally bankrupt Krakoan leaders like Professor X and Emma Frost are, and you can see why Mystique (Who has a 1 panel cameo) wants to burn the place down. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Review: The Last Annihilation: Wakanda #1

The Last Annihilation: Wakanda #1

The recent MCU series What If?, is one of the studio’s best projects to come out in recent years. As the stories they have told thus far, has transcended what they have done in the movies. As the latest episode as of this writing, asks the question, if Killmonger used his intellect to outsmart Iron Man and Black Panther, how powerful could he become? These types of questions would only be asked before, only in the comic books.

The show posits possibilities that if one took a different road or made a different decision, just how drastically different things would be. The aspect I loved about the show thus far is how much it has delved into the world of Wakanda. As it has become increasingly apparent that the Wakandans are at the center of whatever is going on in the MCU. In this one –shot we find Black Panther and M’Baku as the join forces to fight Dormammu in The Last Annihilation: Wakanda #1.

We open on M’Baku , as he reminisces about his friend, Nakia, and wonders the meaning of life , after he fought with T’Challa against the Emperor N’ Jadaka, and raising N’Jadaka’s daughter, Zenzi, who is being trained with the Dora Milaje. T’Challa is soon contacted by the Shiar Imperial Guard, as they have intel that the forces of Dormammu is carrying out a galaxy wide invasion , which forces him to ask M’Baku to help, with the assistance of Shuri, Manifold and Vibraxas. As soon as they arrive on Shiar home world, the discover a planet overrun by Dormammu’s forces, pushing Manifold to seek the guidance of Zawavari, one of Wakanda’s most powerful mystics, who uncovers the villain’s main motive, to have power over fear. M’Baku returns our heroes to Planet Bast, to retrieve a KouKou Array a device which can shake a whole planet to death, but can be repurposed to protect the planet from magical energy from Ego. By issue’s end, T’Challa and Storm arrive to help, giving them another weapon to use and proving M’Baku can be more than he ever saw himself to be.

Overall, The Last Annihilation: Wakanda #1 is an excellent one shot comic which adds dimensions to these characters we have come to love. The story by Narcisse is layered and thrilling. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, a great book which highlights one of the MCU’s favorite characters.

Story: Evan Narcisse Art: Germán Peralta
Color: Jesus Aburtov Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters – Boushh #1

Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters – Boushh #1

The minds at the Disney understood the world of Star Wars before they even owned Lucasfilm. They had been minding the wonder of magic for decades. They knew how to feed their fanbase before they even knew what they wanted. I dare anyone to walk through one of their parks, and not be pulled in by how enchanting the whole place is.

So when they acquired Lucasfilm, they already knew how they wanted to approach the franchise and how to expand it. The continuation of The Clone Wars and the two seasons of The Mandalorian proved just how committed the were to keeping fans interested. Where they really shine is in finding those stories within the universe, like in Rogue One. In one of the first standalone stories about the Bounty Hunters within Star Wars, we get the backstory to a minor character whose origin is much more complicated in Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters – Boushh #1.

We are taken to Ord Mantell City in the Bright Jewel System, where find Boushh and his crew just took back a stolen vehicle for a boss from the Black Sun. We soon find out Boushh had been banned from his home planet Uba IV and often take dangerous jobs to keep fed. As they take on a job form a duplicitous character named Margo, where they must eliminate the executive board of the Tagge Corporation. We soon meet Lady Domina, the head of the corporation who took out most of her family members to rise to the top, and the family’s insidious plans makes The Emperor’s ruminations infantile in comparison. Boushh’s crew finally invades the ship they are, taking out most of the corporation’s security, but they several underestimated Domina. By the book’s end, though Boushh and his guys were defeated, they instead find a compromise, and join forces with Domina to extinguish her enemies.

Overall, Star Wars: War of the Bounty Hunters – Boushh #1 is a story I didn’t expect much from and was pleasantly surprised to find an action packed sidewinder. The story by Alyssa Wong is exciting. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, an excellent story that will excite long time fans of Star Wars.

Story: Alyssa Wong Art: David Baldeon
Color: Israel Silva Letterer: Ariana Maher
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Campisi: The Dragon Incident #2

A mob fixer has to deal with a dragon that’s come to the territory. Do you need to know anything more than that? It’s the mob vs. a dragon!

Story: James Patrick
Art: Marco Locati
Color: Marco Locati
Letterer: Rachel Deering

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Beyond the Breach #3

Beyond the Breach #3 keeps up the twists and turns that have made the series fun to read.

Story: Ed Brisson
Art: Damian Couceiro
Color: Patricio Delepeche
Letterer: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Clans of Belari #3

Clans of Belari #3 follows to stories that unfortunately we’ve seen far too many times before.

Story: Peter Blackie, Rob Blackie
Art: Daniel Maine
Color: Carlos Lopez
Letterer: Taylor Esposito

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ninjak #3

Ninjak #3

I’m genuinely surprised by how much I’m enjoying Javier Pulido‘s artwork in this series. Upon initially seeing the preview pages for Ninjak #3, I was cautiously optimistic that I would come to like the artist’s style as I had flashbacks of another comic that I was initially disappointed in the art style before I began to appreciate what the team were doing with the comic. I’m in a similar position now, albeit starting from a more open position, and watching Pulido play with the panels, borders and layouts on each page is a genuinely exciting feeling. Especially once you realize how the page needs to be read (which is honestly one of the only drawbacks to his creativity is that it sometimes took me a few seconds to work out how to read the page because of the layouts).

Ninjak #3 continues to evoke the series James Bond vibes as Ninjak and Agent Myna confront a kill team sent after Neville Alcott before the duo head to a mysterious mountain base. With the comic picking up exactly where the previous issue left off, Jeff Parker throws you right back into the action – which is going to be great for the trade, but because of the gap between issues, it adds to the pace of things on the page as your brain recalls what had happened in the immediate pages leading up to what you’re about to see.

Because we’re now three issues into this creative team, you’re going to know whether you want to continue with the series and its creative team or not; Ninjak #3, for me, establishes the unique aesthetic (when it comes to Valiant’s comics at any rate) and the consistent pacing of the comic places it higher on my weekly reading list than a lot of other books. Parker and Pulido have delivered another solid comic that’s sure to have people talking – I can’t wait to see what they have in store for us next issue.

You’ll see the first few pages above to get an idea of just what Pulido is capable of; at first glance the style seems like an overly simplistic one at first, but the depth of storytelling he delivers is fantastic.

Story and Art: Jeff Parker and Javier Pulido
Letters: Dave Sharpe and Javier Pulido
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties

Hellboy comics can be a hell of a lot of fun. Mike Mignola has created characters and a world that balances a rich and complicated universe but also can deliver stories that can be picked up and enjoyed with little knowledge. Mignola has figured out how to balance the ongoing narrative with the one-shot. Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties is example of the comic you can just pick up and enjoy. You have to have little knowledge of the characters but if you do, there’s clearly more to this issue.

Written by Mignola and Chris Roberson, Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties has Hellboy and Agent Xiang looking for a book that can summon demons. It takes them to a house where unnatural things are occurring or it could be horrible family relations. There’s not a ton you really need to know to enjoy the comic. It’s a pretty typical “fight demons” type of story. Where it works well is the build up and tension.

Mignola and Roberson keep the readers guessing. Who’s the malignant force in the house? Who is going to be the demon they must fight? Where’s the demon they’ll have to fight? It’s all pretty standard but the way it’s presented will leave you not knowing who can be trusted until that’s revealed. There’s also some solid creepy moments. You get a cinematic feel as the horrors are presented. While it doesn’t deliver scares, there’s a general unease created by the imagery that works really well.

That’s due to the art of Laurence Campbell. Joined by Dave Stewart on colors and Clem Robins lettering, the visuals for the comic are excellent. There are some solid moments that really will make readers unease but never grossed out. There’s the type of visuals you’re not expecting so they deliver a slight punch as they’re revealed. But, it’s all done in a way that doesn’t really scare as opposed to make readers “sick”. With the colors and pencils combined, the art has a vibe about it that is more unease and gross than make you not want to turn a page.

Hellboy and the B.P.R.D.: 1957—Family Ties is a solid start to this series of one-shot comics. It has some details that fans of the Hellboy world will enjoy but those who have never read a story can ignore and not miss anything. It’s a solid horror comic for this Halloween season and one fans of Hellboy or the horror genre should check out.

Story: Mike Mignola and Chris Roberson Art: Laurence Campbell
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Clem Robins
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.3 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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