Category Archives: Reviews

General DC

Review: Mandela and the General

Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid hero and first leader of the new South Africa, is an international symbol of the power of a popular movement to fight structural racism. But his fight for democracy almost spiraled into an all-out race war. Knowing he couldn’t avert a bloodbath on his own, he reached out to General Constand Viljoen, the former chief of apartheid South Africa’s military.

This graphic novel chronicles the struggle of transition of South African from the apartheid state to the democracy of today and the men who avoided war to do so.

With today’s reality this graphic novel by John Carlin and Oriol Malet is more interesting now than ever.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Bitter Root #1

One of the most underrated filmmakers of all time is Mario Van Peebles. His movies both entertain and provoke thought. New Jack City brought the world to the inner city and made it face the crack dilemma. Panther told the story of the Black Panthers through a rather unique perspective. Then there is the movie which I consider his best, Baadasssss, about his father’s monumental film that started the conversation of what Black people would like to see in theaters.

His movies filled a space where people rarely saw themselves on screen. The films sometimes were based on real life and sometimes delved into other genres where he made sure to change the game. He challenged the trope that black people usually died in fantasy and horror films by making them the heroes. His most recent show on Syfy, Superstition, revolved around a demon hunting family in New Orleans. This last foray into television yielded mixed results. It lacked a few things but was an exceptional concept. In the first issue of David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene’s Bitter Root, the promise shown in that show is fully realized in a similar concept with a few twists.

We are transported to 1920s Harlem where a young couple is killed by mysterious circumstances. In the comic we meet the Sangerye family, a group of demon hunters whose purpose is to protect New York and cancel the apocalypse. We also meet Doctor Sylvester who is searching for a serum to control his supernatural condition. The Sangeryes may be his only hope.

Overall, the first issue is an excellent debut that unfolds like Dirty Dozen meets the Italian Job where one badass family is about to save the world.  The story by David F. Walker and Chuck Brown is action packed, epic, smart, funny and challenges just about every supernatural trope. The art by Sanford Greene is stunning and luminous. Altogether, one of the best books to come from Image in a while, one that already has changed the game.

Story: David F. Walker and Chuck Brown Art: Sanford Greene
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Uncanny X-Men #1

Uncanny X-Men is back and kicks off “X-Men Disassembled,” a ten part weekly event! This is a must for X-Men fans.

Uncanny X-Men #1 is by Ed Brisson, Matthew Rosenberg, Kelly Thompson, Mahmud Asrar, Rachelle Rosenberg, Joe Caramagna, Mirko Colak, Ibraim Roberson, Mark Bagley, Andrew Hennessy, and Guru-eFX.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Avengers #10

Issue “700” of the Avengers is here and Marvel has downplayed how big of an issue is. This will set the course of the Marvel Universe for years to come and begins to answer questions set up years ago.

Avengers #10 is by Jason Aaron, Ed McGuinness, David Marquez, Frazer Irving, Adam Kubert, Andrea Sorrentino, Justin Ponsor, Erick Arciniega, Matthew Wilson, Giada Marchisio, and Cory Petit.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Black Order #1

The breakout characters from Avengers: Infinity War are getting their own limited series picking up from Avengers: No Surrender.

Written by Derek Landy, with art by Phillip Tan, ink by Marc Deering, Guillermo Ortega, Le Beau Underwood, color by Jay David Ramos, and lettering by VC’ Clayton Cowles, the villains take the spotlight!

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Mandela and the General

Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid hero and first leader of the new South Africa, is an international symbol of the power of a popular movement to fight structural racism. But his fight for democracy almost spiraled into an all-out race war. Knowing he couldn’t avert a bloodbath on his own, he reached out to General Constand Viljoen, the former chief of apartheid South Africa’s military.

This graphic novel chronicles the struggle of transition of South African from the apartheid state to the democracy of today and the men who avoided war to do so.

With today’s reality this graphic novel by John Carlin and Oriol Malet is more interesting now than ever.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dragon Ball: That Time I Got Reincarnated as Yamcha!

A Dragon Ball fan’s greatest dream is getting to live in the Dragon Ball universe and fight alongside Goku and his friends! But one particular fan is in for a rude awakening when he suddenly dies and gets reincarnated as everyone’s favorite punching bag, Yamcha!

Having never read a Dragon Ball manga or watched the anime, this release seemed like a way to dip our toes into the world. How does it stack up for a new reader? Find out!

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

VIZ Media provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Zahra: The Shadow Flame #1

Families usually hide family secrets like hidden treasures, as some of those secrets were hidden for a reason in the first place. As when family members find out the truth behind what they considered facts, one of two feelings usually overwhelm the individual. The first one is genuine surprise, where you get overwhelmed with the novelty of the news. The second and most probable reaction, is betrayal, as they feel the need to lie to the family members for some unforeseen reasons.

In real life, Jack Nicholson, found out that the woman he thought was his sister, was actually his mother. This very story was told on a current storyline in the new show, Mayans MC, where one of the club members finally reveals to a girl who was raised as his sister, to be his daughter. Some family secrets are sometimes too much for those affected to ever know. In the debut issue of Zahra The Shadow Flame, we find one young lady coming to grips with what she just found about who she will become and her family’s powers.

We meet Zahra Darwesh, a young lady, who has a rather unusual but mystical connection to fire, as she can manipulate flames like most people can bend straws, as she belongs to a long family line of powerful women with powers known as the Birthweepers. As the only child of a council member in a mythical country called United Arabia, as she struggles with being a teenage girl and hiding the secret of her powers. One day, a fire ignites at her school causing Zahra to leap into action, saving hundreds of girls, but catching the eye of local authorities. By issue’s end, the secrets her and her mother holds, destroys her family, revealing a loved one to be the true villain of the story and that her journey to self-discovery is only beginning.

Overall, an engaging story that reveals the dangers of anachronistic beliefs, the changing roles of power when it comes to gender and embracing who you really are is the only truth. The story by Baker-Johnson and Sindi, is full of twists, layered and action packed. The art by Tinto and Montrose, is gorgeous. Altogether, a stark and fresh take on the superhero origin story, one which is emblematic of the evils of sexism and that heroism is not only for those wearing capes.

Story: Kali Baker-Johnson and Rakan Sindi Art: Davide Tinto and Michelle Montrose
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 10/20

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

BDRTOWN_03_300-001.jpg Border Town #3 (DC/Vertigo)** – This book seems to be hitting a nice, strong stride very early on, with this being the best issue to date. Ramon Villalobos’ art has always been stellar and remains so, but Eric M. Esquivel’s scripting is evening out from some early rockiness, balancing real-world political issues with supernatural goings-on and even some well-placed (and well-considered) humor. In fact, there’s a laugh-out-loud scene in this issue that’s just plain awesome. Get on this series now if you’re not already. Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Batman #58 (DC)** – The welcome return of Mikel Janin on art is the highlight of this issue, which marks the beginning of a new “Penguin-centric” arc. Tom King’s script is at least competent this time out, but hardly the stuff memories are made of , mostly just jumping around between a couple of timelines in order to set the stage for the the rest of the story. It’s thoroughly readable and the cliffhanger packs a bit of a punch, but when Alfred comes off as being more interesting than Bruce Wayne/Batman, well — you’ve got a problem. Overall: 6 Recommendation: Read

Dead Rabbit #2 (Image)** – Good on Gerry Duggan and John McCrea to insert some “real world” socio-economic issues (most notably relating to health care) into this “criminal comes out of retirement” drama, but the strength of this series is in its cinematic pacing and stylish, high-impact art. Not a whole ton happens this time out, but what does adds depth to the characters and their situations while never slowing down from its breakneck tempo. Lots of fun, especially if you love a good car chase. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Outer Darkness #1 (Image/Skybound)** – A heavy debt is owed to Jack Kirby’s “Captain Victory And The Galactic Rangers” with John Layman’s premise for this book, but there’s a gut-churning occult twist to the proceedings and some solid humor added into the mix, and Afu Chan’s artwork is just straight-up spectacular, particularly on his Kirby-flavored “cosmic” double-page spreads. Nothing super ground-breaking here, but I had plenty of fun with this one and it seems like it’s a series that could go off in any number of interesting directions. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

Han Solo: Imperial Cadet #1 (Marvel)– In probably one of the most authentic representations to a military boot camp I have ever seen or read, this book more than delivers. We catch up with Han after he separates from Qira, and right after he gets sent to boot camp, where he gains a few skills,that Star Wars fans will see later in life. As he gets as good as he gives, and we see his penchant for getting in trouble make him a terrible mismatch for the military. By issue’s end, he finds a way off base, but only to be caught and a whole lot to explain. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

 


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Review: The Comedian

Art is truly a therapeutic escape for anyone who indulges in it on a regular basis. One can escape from their everyday worries through the venues of literature, music or even art.  It is one thing to be a consumer of these mediums, it is wholly different to participate. When one makes their own, it becomes something so intimate, powerful and gives that person a sense of their own destiny.

This is what made watching Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, such an introspective look into what makes an artist and how does one start such a journey. In this story, a homemaker finds out her husband is cheating, decides to begin a career as a standup comic.  This is why life is more than work, as you need to find time to smell the flowers, and sometimes, you need to find yourself in the most unexpected places. In The Comedian, Khalid Nahar, give the reader somebody much like Midge Maisel, but in Amman, Jordan.

In the opening pages, we meet Fareed, a man who is considering ending his life, as his home life is in disarray and his job pretty much sucks. This changes when a work colleague gives Fareed a flyer for an open mic comedy night, at the local comedy club, one which may change his life, and one he did not know he longed for, until his drive home. Weeks later, he finds that same flyer, finds an old book of his jokes from college and decides to take a chance, on the open mic. His first time was rough but ignites his creative passion and a lust for the stage. As his mood changes, so does his relationship with his wife and so does his comedy routine. In fact, his whole life becomes better. His wife eventually finds out where he goes every Saturday night and is there for one of his routines, where he compares her to a truck. By book’s end, an accident leads to someone close to Fareed not surviving and to a shocking final scene.

Overall, an excellent comic which examines the solace of the mundane and the promise of dreams unfulfilled. The story by Nahar, is smart, funny, engaging, and heartfelt. The art by Nahar is simply beautiful. Altogether, an impressive debut book by this more than capable storyteller.

Story: Khalid Nahar Art: Khalid Nahar
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

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