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Win an Art Commission from Shadowman Artist Jon Davis-Hunt

Ahead of Shadowman #1‘s release (on sale April 28th), Valiant Entertainment is excited to give fans the opportunity to win an original art commission by series artist Jon Davis-Hunt!

The bone-chilling artist is filling the pages of Shadowman with horror and supernatural thrills, and now he will create a single character commission (11×17, pencils) for one very lucky and randomly selected fan.

The giveaway is now accepting entries and will close on Wednesday, March 31st at 11:59pm EST. The winner will receive an email reply to their entry no later than 5pm EST on April 1st. Entering is easy. See below for details.

Send an email to shadowman@valiantentertainment.com with the following information…

Email Subject Line: Art Contest

Include the following in the body of the email…

First & Last Name:
Shipping Address:
Single Character Art Request:

No purchase is necessary to enter and the single character art request does not need to be a Valiant character (though it would be pretty cool if it was). The randomly selected winner will be mailed their commission within four months of being selected. Only one entry per person, entries without all of the information filled out will not be valid.

Written by master of horror Cullen Bunn, Shadowman #1 will arrive in comic shops on April 28th, 2021, featuring colors by Jordie Bellaire, letters by Clayton Cowles, and covers by Jon Davis-HuntRod ReisDave JohnsonTony Moore, and Jeff Dekal. The pre-order deadline is April 5th, 2021.

Shadowman #1 artwork by Jon Davis-Hunt

Early Review: Shadowman #1

Shadowman #1

It’s been a few years since we’ve had a Shadowman book and we probably would have had this one last year if the pandemic had not changed the publishing approach for Valiant. With Shadowman #1, Valiant has Cullen Bunn, who is no stranger to their universe, having written the very excellent Punk Mambo mini-series from a few years back and also Roku. Valiant has stated that this book will be more of a horror book than a superhero title. It sounds just like the kind of book I like from Bunn.

Shadowman #1 opens by establishing who Shadowman is. He fights the evil of the Deadside, which is sort of a halfway point of the afterlife. Something big and bad has broken through to our world and in good fashion, is defeated and sent back to where it has come from. From there, we get more action as a fancy party is to play host for a more gruesome event for Shadowman.

In the past, Valiant’s first issues would always hook me on a book. Lately, it’s not as easy, as I have disliked a few books here and there. One of those was Roku, which was also written by Bunn. My hopes going into Shadowman was it would harkon back to a feeling I used to get with their books and I can say that this was a first issue that did not disappoint. I liked that it did read as a single issue story. And going off the second part of the book, it definitely felt like something from the realm of horror. While I wasn’t blown away by the dialogue, much of the story is pushed along by Shadowman’s inner dialogue, which is nicely done. Add in that it’s a good jumping-on spot for the character, and it feels like this could be one of the better books to come out of 2021.

Jon Davis-Hunt brings the art and his Shadowman just looks so awesome. Seriously, the way he looks in his suit/costume is fantastic. He manages to draw lots of disgusting things throughout the first issue. All I can say is I hope he’s on Shadowman for a long time because he’s definitely got a really detailed style and with colorist Jordie Bellaire on this book with him, it could be one of the best-looking Shadowman books we’ve gotten. I thought the lettering by Cowles was a nice cherry on top of everything else with Shadowman.

I think Shadowman #1 is just what the Valiant fan base needs. Maybe they don’t love books like Savage and maybe X-O Manowar left them a bit grumpy but I feel this feels like a natural progression of who Shadowman is. The writing is there and the art is there. And if nothing else, it left me feeling like a publisher could draw me in hard with a really good first issue.

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Jon Davis-Hunt
Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Pre-order: comiXology – Kindle – TFAW

Early Review: Shadowman #1

Shadowman #1

Jack Boniface is Shadowman, a powerful protector who keeps humanity safe from the demons that claw at the fabric of our reality. In Shadowman #1, the forces of darkness are awakening and they are hungry for life. Will Shadowman be able to save us all, or will the darkness devour the world as we know it?

I initially read this book in preparation for an interview a couple weeks ago, and I’ve been thinking about it pretty consistently ever since.

If I had written this review then, you’d have seen me raving about the comic, saying things like how amazing it was. I would have said that Jon Davis-Hunt‘s artwork is everything I didn’t know I needed in a Shadowman comic, just as Cullen Bunn‘s writing is everything I had hoped it would be and more. It may have sounded hyperbolic, but it would have at least started out with honest intentions.

Eventually, I’d have gone on to say how one of my favourite aspects of the comic was in how it told an almost complete story that made me question who the real monster was (and honestly, I’m still not entirely sure). Bunn’s story is, appropriately enough, steeped in the grey shades of morality. There’s no real clear cut villain in the comic, though there’s a lot of people you wouldn’t be upset to see at the wrong end of Shadowman’s fists, and so watching the title character navigate his way through the events of the comic with compassion and humanity only reinforces what you’re seeing on the page as being tragic.

Davis-Hunt’s artwork is brilliant on its own, but his heavy inks are given spectacular life by Jordie Bellaire‘s use of colour, who contributes an underrated and unstated character to the pages; the judicious use of deep blues and greys in the slower scenes juxtapose with the reds used during the more frantic set pieces to a wonderous effect. I didn’t notice how much Bellaire’s contributions to the comic influenced my speed of reading.

The fact of the matter is, had I written this review when I first read it, I’d have been gushing about the book. I’d have pointed out that Shadowman was always a character I struggled to get into because I’ve never been as drawn to the mystical side of things (it’s why I could relate to Ninjak so much during the Rapture miniseries), and yet I really love his story. It’s an odd dichotomy where I like the idea of Shadowman, but haven’t yet found a story that defines the character for me. The more I think about this comic, and the more I read it, I’m beginning to think that this has the potential of becoming THE Shadowman comic for me.

Of course, I didn’t write the review immediately after reading it the first time, and have allowed the book to sit in my mind for weeks as I reread the pdf every couple of days to work out whether a horror book (something that I usually don’t find myself as drawn to) really is one of my Must Read books to have come out this year.

The answer is an unequivocal yes. Shadowman #1 is an absolute fucking triumph of a comic. It was absolutely worth the wait.

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Jon Davis-Hunt
Colours: Jordie Bellaire Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.7 Art: 9.7 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Pre-order: comiXologyKindleTFAW

Exclusive: Heather Antos Takes Us Into the Shadowy World of Shadowman

Shadowman #1

Shadowman #1 debuts on April 28th! The debut issue from master of horror Cullen Bunn and acclaimed artist Jon Davis-Hunt, with color by Jordie Bellaire and lettering by Clayton Cowles will soon be unleashed on the world.

Jack Boniface is SHADOWMAN, a powerful protector who keeps humanity safe from the demons that claw at the fabric of our reality.

The forces of darkness are awakening and they are hungry for life. Will Shadowman be able to save us all, or will the darkness devour the world as we know it?

We got a chance to talk to editor Heather Antos about the series and its place in the Valiant universe.

Graphic Policy: Hey Heather, hope you’re well! Being completely honest, this book was better than I ever expected – y’all must be excited to finally have it seeing the light of day?

Heather Antos: I’ll take “better than expected” any day — and I expected it to be great! So, huzzah! I am beyond thrilled that Shadowman #1 has finally hit the stands. I first approached Cullen about this project…gosh…a little over TWO years ago now? After pandemic delays it’s hard to believe we’re finally out there!

GP: If you had to describe Shadowman to a new reader, how would you do it?

HA:  A quick TL:DR on Shadowman: Jack Boniface is a musician by day, and a demon hunter by night, essentially (Okay, it’s a liiiiiiiiiittle more complicated than that). He was born into a legacy of protecting the realm of the living from the darkness of the Deadside partnered with the Shadow Loa Bosou, but it’s not the lifestyle he would’ve chosen for himself. Torn between the life of the living and the world of the dead, Jack has to put his responsibility to protect humanity above all else. He’s a little bit Voodoo…a little bit rock ‘n roll, ha!

Shadowman #1

GP: How did the collaboration with Cullen Bunn and Jon Davis-Hunt come about?

HA: Cullen Bunn and I are longtime collaborators, but I’m even a longer time fan of his horror work. For years we talked about trying to do a horror project together but it just never quite worked out…until Valiant. When I started at the company Shadowman was top on my list of characters I wanted to take a stab at — he was the first Valiant character I ever read, after all — and I knew exactly the writer for the job. As for Jon, we had never worked together previously, but I was an instant fan of his work when I saw him in Vertigo’s THE CLEAN ROOM. His open line inking style is great for horror as it misleads the reader into thinking everything is “safe”…and then you turn the page and see the grotesque horror unleash! He’s truly genius in his storytelling and is absolutely bringing his A-game in every panel.

GP: Shadowman and horror feel like chocolate and peanut butter (though maybe fire and brimstone is a more appropriate analogy…). Where did the direction for the comic come from? Was it something you had in mind before Cullen came on board?

HA: Sort of? I mean, yes, I knew I wanted to take Shadowman in a more distinct horror direction going in, but I also knew that Cullen Bunn was the writer I wanted to approach off the bat. Luckily, he said yes and turned in the most perfect pitch. The rest is history!

Shadowman #1

GP: The first issue is (almost) a complete story in and of itself; was that a happy accident or part of a larger plan?

HA: Making sure each issue was a complete story was absolutely a discussion Cullen and I had during the development of this series. One of the biggest things I wanted to make sure we explored in this series is how the Deadside looks and affects other parts of the world outside of New Orleans. The veil between worlds is wearing thin, so in each issue we see Jack travel the world in order to hunt down whatever it is that is causing these “cracks” to break between dimensions.

GP: There’s a fine balance between horror and crossing that line into gore. Is that something you’re thinking about with the series?

HA: One of the cool things about the Horror genre is that the word “horror” paints a different picture in every person’s mind. For some, it’s 90s slasher films…for others, jump scares…monsters in the night…supernatural beings…tension building thrillers…and we want to explore them all! Like every issue is a complete “episode” that adds to a larger story, we wanted to explore the different ‘tastes’ of horror throughout every issue as well.

GP: Shadowman stands out as the “horror” series of the Valiant Universe which right now is very superhero and sci-fi based. What type of work, if any, goes into making sure this series still “fits in” with the rest?

Shadowman #1

HA: What I love about the Valiant universe is the central themes of the characters have less to do with “genre” and more so to do with the characters and the roles in which they find themselves. Exploring themes like “what is the responsibility of power” is a stronger component to tying the universe together — something we see in spades with Shadowman.

GP: This might be the first time I’ve ever felt sorry for a demon. Not to spoil, but there’s a touching moment in all of the horror from an unexpected place. When developing the first issue, what was your reaction to that part? It feels unusual (in a good way) for this genre of story.

HA: Even in horror, there are two sides to every story. And without spoiling TOO much from this first issue (GO READ IT, PLEASE!!!!), it’s important to remember that not all is as it seems on page 1. Shadowman has a mystery on his hands. Why is this demon in the living Earth? And how can he stop it from happening again? What brought it here…now?

GP: If you had to design a soundtrack/playlist to read Shadowman to, what would you include? 

HA: I hear the big fans over at A SOUND OF THUNDER have created just the song for this — “The Veil (Theme from Shadowman)”! Also, from my own collection, I’d HAVE to add Coheed & Cambria’s “The Dark Sentencer”.

GP: Thanks so much for chatting. Now that I’ve read the first issue, I can’t wait to read more!

Discover the Future of Valiant in Valiant Uprising, Our Free Comic Book Day 2021

Free Comic Book Day 2021 is the perfect time to step into the Valiant universe.

Featuring a cover by The Harbinger artist Robbi Rodriguez, the Valiant Uprising FCBD Special will be available only in comic book shops this August. The must-read issue is packed with content, including…

  • A brand new X-O Manowar story from Harvey Award-winning writer Dennis Hopeless and breakout star Emilio Laiso. It’s the perfect jumping-on point as Valiant’s flagship hero prepares to “Upgrade the World” this Summer!
  • A special advance preview of The Harbinger #1, an all-new series from co-writers Jackson Lanzing and Colin Kelly with superstar artist Robbi Rodriguez that promises to take Valiant’s psiot rebel in a vivid new direction!
  • Plus, find out how the world’s greatest spy responds to being unmasked, hunted, and trapped in a first look at Ninjak #1, the pulse-pounding thrill ride from Ringo Award-winning writer Jeff Parker and legendary artist Javier Pulido.
  • Finally, get a sneak peek from writer Cullen Bunn and artist Jon Davis-Hunt of what’s to come in the terrifying pages of Shadowman!

Free Comic Book Day 2021 takes place on August 14 at your local comic shop.

Valiant Uprising

Review: Savage #2

Savage #2

Teenage heartthrob. Feral social icon. Dinosaur hunter? Raised on an uncharted island full of prehistoric dangers, Kevin Sauvage has a taste of home when a mutant dino threat invades England only to wind up captured! He’s back in Savage #2.

There’s nothing that takes me out of a comic, or really any prose story, then the word bloke being used in a way that doesn’t feel right. Whether it’s because writers from this side of the Atlantic use British slang as often as they can to prove a character is really British, or whether it’s an excuse to show that they simply know the slang, more often than not the words are crammed into the dialogue in unnatural ways that seem to make sense. Unless the person reading the comic is a Brit, in which case there’s usually more eye-rolling than enjoyment. In most cases, less is more with British slang – the word mate and ending a sentence with “yeah?” instead of “eh?” will do the job if you’re not sure how to use the words in the context we’d typically use them.

Max Bemis is one of the few writers who uses a lot of slang for Savage (the character) and doesn’t miss a beat. Which in some ways also took me out of the book because I was waiting for a misstep that never happened, which caused me to read the comic twice before I realized it.

That Bemis’ take on Savage is different than B. Clay Moore’s first miniseries should surprise nobody – the setting alone is going to have that effect on the story. The series move from a survival comic (almost survival horror) to one bordering on the science fantasy isn’t an illogical step with story in the comic has Savage as an unwilling guest of a mad scientist/visionary intent on using him for experimentation and research (as an aside, the reading of this book coincided with me and Bemis plays into to absurdity of the mad scientist trop with his tongue firmly in is cheek (either that or he’s so brilliantly earnest about the Project Bizarre angle that you can’t help but love it).

Nathan Stockman, Triona Farrell, and Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou round out the creative team for Savage #2 as artist, colorist, and letterer respectively. Otsmane-Elhaou’s work is noticeably good in this issue, which is a rare feat for a comics’ lettering to stand out in a positive way, with his liberal use of colored fonts and upper and lower case becoming more than just a method to convey Bemis’ words. This book is an example of lettering as its own art form, a comic to show those who claim that anybody can throw words onto a page, which although that is a true statement, the same is also true; anybody can write a story or draw a picture – but there’s a difference between my pictures and Nathan Stockman’s pictures). Stockman’s art is great; there’s a very punky feeling to the comic, at times evoking Pushead’s art style, but almost consistently embodying the rebellious nature of the title character.

The comic looks great, from top to bottom. I wasn’t expecting to laugh during this comic, but there’s an undeniable streak of humor throughout Savage #2 that never quite stays in its lane, swerving between slapstick, dark, and often the downright silly. It doesn’t overpower the story, which is fantastic, but rather adds another layer of fun to an already enjoyable book. I love it.

Story: Max Bemis Art: Nathan Stockman
Colours: Trionna Farrell Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.4 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics – TFAW

Preview: Savage #2

SAVAGE #2

Written by MAX BEMIS
Art by NATHAN STOCKMAN
Colors by TRIONA FARRELL
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by MARCUS TO
Cover B by MICHAEL WALSH
Preorder Variant Cover by DAVID LOPEZ
On sale MARCH 17th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Mad geniuses Max Bemis (Worst X-Man Ever) and Nathan Stockman (Spidey) deliver over-the-top mayhem in this second thrilling chapter!

NEW VILLAINS have captured our teen heartthrob hero. What’s their master plan and what do these monsters trying to eat Savage have to do with it?

SAVAGE #2

Review: Bloodshot #12

Bloodshot #12

The finale of The Last Shot, and by extension the current run of Bloodshot #12 finally gives us the confrontation between Bloodshot and Rampage Harmony that we’ve been waiting for since Bloodshot Salvation teased us with the possibility years ago (it probably feels longer than it is because of the last year, honestly). Was it worth the wait?

Read on, and we’ll find out together!*

*well, you’ll find out – I already know.

To quote myself from the review of Bloodshot #11: “When it comes to the content and feel of this issue, and indeed the arc itself, I’d be willing to put money on the fact that One Last Shot was originally set to come out a lot closer to the release of the 2020 Bloodshot movie, as the arc feels in some ways as a pseudo sequel to the Vin Diesel movie told through the eyes of the Valiant comic universe. But with the delays caused by Covid 19 and the effective shutdown of the comics industry for a few months (not to mention Valiant’s still-reduced publishing schedule), things haven’t worked out that way.” I repeat this, because it’s worth noting that this book likely having been written and finished months ago means that the mob/riot/protest scenes glimpsed in this issue (but shown in more detail the last issue) have an eerie familiarity to the scenes in January. That familiarity adds a weight to the story that it may otherwise not quite have – whether this will be a timeless story or a story of the time remains to be seen, but it’s certainly a check in the right column for me when I read the comic today.

Bloodshot #12 is written by Tim Seeley, features art by Pedro Andreo, colours by the ever reliable Andrew Dalhouse and lettering by Dave Sharpe.

Sharpe’s lettering is going to be overlooked because the man is constant; never doing anything to break you from the book, rather doing everything right in keeping your eye moving across the page – often pulling your eye to parts of Andreo’s art without ever obscuring it. Andreo gives the comic a really interesting flavour; the relative newcomer’s art is kinetic and easy to follow – the drawbacks I noted last issue were nowhere to be found here. The artists get to flourish within Seeley’s story, making some great use of the white space between the panels as Bloodshot and Harmony fight their way across half a dozen pages in the comic. It wasn’t the fight that I was expecting, but it was still a satisfying conclusion that builds upon threads Seeley had left throughout the series. I won’t spoil what exactly happens, but it did leave me satisfied all things considered (of course I’d have loved to have a few more pages of the fight, but there’d have been no real way to elongate that scene without taking away the balance of the comic itself unless the main story in the comic was longer…).

Seeley wraps up this series with Bloodshot #12 satisfactorily. He pulls on aspects of Lemire’s run without revealing specifics, which is perfect if you’ve yet to read those issues after getting a taste of Bloodshot with Seeley’s run. It was a solid run, albeit one that was certainly impacted by the shifting release schedule, but I think it was a step in the right direction for the character, aligning the comics with the movie whilst still entertaining the hell out of me. I’m curious where the character will be headed in the future – and we won’t gave long to wait, all things considered, as Bloodshot will return in 2022.

I can’t wait.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.4 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology KindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Shadowman Unleashes Horror in a New Trailer and on Comic Shelves in April

Shadowman #1 is only a month away.

The debut issue from master of horror Cullen Bunn and acclaimed artist Jon Davis-Hunt, with color by Jordie Bellaire and lettering by Clayton Cowles, goes on sale April 28th. To celebrate the upcoming Shadowman series, Valiant Entertainment is pulling fans into Shadowman’s terrifying world with a brand-new trailer. The new video offers a taste of what fans can expect from the series: supernatural suspense and horror with some superhero action. Enjoy!

Shadowman #1 is currently available for pre-order at a comic shop near you and via ComiXology. It features covers by Jon Davis-Hunt, Rod Reis, Dave Johnson, Tony Moore, and Jeff Dekal.

From the bestselling master of horror Cullen Bunn (Venom) and bone-chilling artist Jon Davis-Hunt (Clean Room) comes a shocking supernatural odyssey.

Jack Boniface is SHADOWMAN, a powerful protector who keeps humanity safe from the demons that claw at the fabric of our reality.

The forces of darkness are awakening and they are hungry for life. Will Shadowman be able to save us all, or will the darkness devour the world as we know it?

Preview: Bloodshot #12

BLOODSHOT #12

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by ADELSO CORONA
Cover B by JIMBO SALGADO
Preorder Variant Cover by JIM TOWE
Backup Written by BENNY POTTER
Backup Art by JUAN JOSÉ RYP
Backup Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Backup Letters by DAVE SHARPE
On sale MARCH 10th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

“One Last Shot” has a final epic battle!

Will Bloodshot and his team be able to stop one of his greatest villains from obtaining Project Rising Spirit’s most insidious weapon?

It’s the jaw-dropping conclusion to the series by best-selling writer Tim Seeley and rising star Pedro Andreo!

BLOODSHOT #12
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