Tag Archives: wizard world

Victor Dandridge: The Hardest Working Man in Comics Tells All

20150821_172619I caught up with Victor Dandridge after a panel on independent comics and diversity that was a bit of a disaster. All of the other panelists were white men, and while they acknowledged the absurdity of their situation, they ended up sidestepping most of the issues that the panel intended to engage with. But Victor clearly had plenty to say about representing diversity: as an African-American writer, as the creator of black gay superhero The Samaritanand as the owner of Vantage: Inhouse Productions. We discussed his many projects, marketing to different age groups, and identifying with comics characters who don’t look like us. I started off asking Victor to talk about his work in general.

Victor Dandridge: Basically, with my work I try to – and this is one of the things I wanted to get into [on the How Independent Creators Can Help Solve the Industry’s Diversity Issues panel] but we didn’t get into, is I actually delegate my books based on age range. So I have all-ages with Wonder Care Presents: The Kinder Guardians, teen-friendly with Origins Unknown, young adult with The Trouble w/ Love, and adult with The Samaritan. So I’m actually one who aims to speak to age groups more than anything. That’s what’s important for me.

Graphic Policy: You’re trying to get a wide audience by segmenting and having them cross over.

VD: Exactly. I don’t want to be one of those guys that presumes the universal product. I know a lot of people that are like, “Oh, anybody can read my book.” Yeah, that might be true, but it’s made for somebody in mind. Like, there’s a certain audience that it speaks best to. I’m not one to openly say, I make black comics, but The Samaritan does speak as a black comic. That one is one. Is The Trouble w/ Love? Maybe not. Does that mean black people can’t get into it? Far from it. But that’s not necessarily who it seems to be marketed to, so that’s not necessarily who I would market it to directly. Same thing with Wonder Care. I know plenty of adults who love Wonder Care. It is kid friendly though. It aims to market itself to children. That’s the goal. So it’s one that says, yes, I acknowledge that this is who it’s for. Can other people get into it? Absolutely. But I definitely take into consideration that I am making things for certain groups of people that might not transcend to everybody. That’s legit, you know?

WC Issue 3 CoverGP: And there’s a place for that. I think you do run into that trap of, do you write for “everybody,” or do you market to a specific segment, or do you just write what you feel and just figure out who’s going to respond to it?

VD: As an indie guy, one of the things that I think gets me away from that is having multiple titles. I know a lot of people who only have one title, so they’re stuck in this place of saying, “This is my book, and it has to speak to everybody, because I only have this one thing.” I’ve been fortunate enough to have a diverse range and so I am effectively able to say, no. This is more for you. This is more for you. And people can say, “Okay, cool.” And I can accept that, and I can run with it. So it works out well.

GP: It’s fun to hear somebody say that when you do have most people who are very, very invested in one project. But I do want to hear more about some of the specific titles that you write. I’m really curious about The Trouble w/ Love, especially because of the anecdote you told [on the panel] about people not wanting to look at it.

VD: Okay, so The Trouble w/ Love is a young adult title, and it features a Superman analogue named Apex Prime. And he has a wife and a family, but then he falls in love with someone else, and years later his son comes to him and says, “Dad, what happened?” And he’s basically explaining how human he is despite all of his myriad superpowers and things like that. And it’s more of a true story. It is actually about my life, a little bit more than not. I had to actively decide not to portray the characters as African-American, because I didn’t want it to necessarily be this thing that is used as a stipulation against black people. I had to think that way. I felt like it would actually speak more universally if it had more roots toward the Superman archetype that it’s built off of. So that’s what I wanted. I already had an African-American Superman-level character in The Samaritan. No need to overpopulate, try to fill in quotas. Let’s switch it up! I don’t have to make him look like me even though this is my story. This could be anybody. Let that play out on the page. So he is definitely Caucasian. The woman that he falls in love with is Hispanic. We’re playing around with things. Not trying to hit quotas, but it’s just how the story worked. It worked for me that way. So that’s why I wanted to tell it. It just is ironic that I was at a show, standing behind a table for black creators, and this woman’s like, “No. I don’t want to read it because it doesn’t have black people.” And I’m like –

GP: It’s autobiographical!

VD: It’s about me! “Yeah, but it doesn’t look like you.” And I’m like, so? There’s lots of people that don’t look like me that speak to me. It is what it is. But people sometimes have trouble looking beyond themselves, which is sad. Forest for the trees.

GP: Are there characters who, growing up as a comics fan, you identified with despite the fact that they didn’t look like you?

VD: Absolutely. So I gave the “Great power, great responsibility” thing. My uncle was violently killed. He was one of the guys who was so behind my getting into comics, and I was eleven years old. Batman! I can get behind that! So the idea of me saying, at eleven, I want to make comics for a living in honor of my uncle, that is essentially my vow by candlelight a la Batman. I didn’t have to have Bruce Wayne look like me in order to have that understanding. Gun violence is something that is very typical in the black community. I can understand that. I don’t have to [descend] into being a gang member, I don’t have to run the streets. I can say, okay, this bad thing happened. I don’t want it to happen to me. I want to do something different. And this is something that we both had an affinity for. I’m going to do something in this vein for him. That’s what I got from Batman. Same with the X-Men as an entire concept. The idea of being hated and feared because you’re different! Yeah, that speaks! It wasn’t until 1975 that we actually had an African-American character in the X-Men, and she was female. I’m not female, so all the more reason to find something akin to who I am, or something about what I think, that is alike with these characters, and it not have to be this cookie-cutter flat-out mirror image of myself.

GP: I’m very much with you on that. People always ask me who my favorite member of the X-Men is, and I’m like, Beast, obviously, and then they look at me for a minute.

VD: I love Gambit. I wanted to be a charming guy, and I wasn’t that cool. I was kind of nerdy. So there was something majestic about how suave he was. I loved Gambit, and that was it. He wasn’t Wolverine, he wasn’t Cyclops. I didn’t need to be the leader. I didn’t need to be the most popular dude. I wanted to be the cool guy.

The SamaritanGP: And I wanted to be the one in the basement who was secretly solving everybody’s problems. Which is Beast. But I did want to talk to you about The Samaritan, which is the one of yours that I know, and didn’t realize was yours. So I’m putting a face to it, which is really cool. But what I love about it – I don’t know if you realize that whenever people talk about queer comics, this is one of the first ones that comes up as an interesting one because of the intersectionality of it being a comic about a black character and a comic about a gay character. I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about that intersection and how you’re twisting the Superman tropes?

VD: With that one, the main character, Smith, is actually homosexual. It’s not something that is widely talked about, because it’s not necessarily pertinent to what he’s doing right now. But it is something that I’ve built into this character, something that’s not going to be for a shock and awe reveal or anything like that. It’s something that I feel is pertinent to him. In fact, there’s a part in the fifth issue where Nita, who is – we’ll call her the prostitute, she throws an option at him, and he declines. That’s one of the first clues that you get, it’s like, he’s not interested in her because he doesn’t like girls. The figure [of Smith] himself is a strong, resolute figure. The idea that he’s homosexual does not make him weak, it doesn’t make him a pansy, sissy, any of the stupid, degrading adjectives that are thrown into anybody who is homosexual. Especially in the black community, it’s not something that is regarded as highly, or even respected as it should be. A person’s preferences, they’re preferences, leave it be. But that’s not the way the community as a whole operates. So that’s one of the reasons why I wanted to look at him that way, to showcase him as that type of figure. I think there’s nothing wrong with that, and that’s the point. I want kids to be like, “Yeah, I want to be Smith!” and have him be so cool, that even with the reveal that he’s gay, they’re like, “So? He’s still awesome. Yeah! I still want to be Smith.” That’s what I’m looking for.

GP: So he’s transcending, and also the idea that he’s still gay even when he doesn’t have a love interest.

VD: Exactly. I recently saw something where they were talking about the notions of how bisexual individuals are portrayed in film, and how it always shows that they are either scandalous, or cheating, or things like that. And I was thinking, well, here’s the truth. The idea of you saying that you’re bisexual can only seem like it’s legit on paper unless you interject both sexes as an option. The only way that you’re really going to do that is to show somebody either being polyamorous, or they’re cheating, or whatever. It’s an unfortunate thing, but the truth is, you would be bisexual even if you’re with a guy and only a guy. If you still have an attraction to women, you’re bisexual. No one should have to prove it in order to claim who they are. And that’s what the point is with Smith. He doesn’t have to be actively seeking a male counterpart right now in order for him to truly be gay. Gay men can be single, too. I feel like that’s a crazy thing to have to say, but apparently we do.

GP: And I think you can get at that perspective by having him be an outsider in more than one way, and having his race something that’s not always commented on but is always present. And making the analogy between the two.

VD: Absolutely, and that’s one of the things that we ended up playing around with very decisively. We have him without a costume. The idea is that he’s wearing a simple hoodie. His aim is to fit into the neighborhoods that he’s walking around in. To just be who he is, and look like as many people as possible, function like anybody else that’s there, but actively be saving as many people as he can.

GP: Awesome!

VD: Thank you.

Ori Unk PromoGP: You are really proud of being an independent writer [and artist].

VD: Absolutely. I love it.

GP: What do you see as the advantages of going that route?

VD: I am free to do whatever style of storytelling that pops into my head. I don’t have to ask permission, I don’t have to see if it’s okay, if it’s going to fit somebody else’s demographic analysis, go through their marketing programs or anything like that. I can just tell stories. Sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t. I do have a story that fell short. It’s called The Villain. I’ve only recently started talking about it again because I was disappointed in it. But at the same time, I kind of revel in the sense that I was able to produce a multitude of titles, and only one hasn’t quite found the market that I was looking for. But in that sense, I can still say, hey, I did it! Nobody can take that away from me. I still put forth more work into this world. I put forth effort, and I learned stuff from it. As an indie guy, I am so free to do as many things as possible. It’s just really up to my whim, what I feel I want to do at any given time. And that’s the beauty part. I’m constantly creating. And I love it.

GP: Do you have any future projects, or anything you’re planning on?

VD: Oh, God, yes! The Trouble w/ Love actually has a follow-up. This is a one-shot, and we have a follow-up called Never Too Late. It’s going to be a four-part series that deals with some of the ramifications or repercussions of this story. That’s going to be coming out. We do have a secret thing with The Samaritan in celebration of the five-year anniversary of its first issue coming out. I don’t want to say too much about it. It’s going to be a surprise. We’re still continuing Wonder Care Presents: The Kinder Guardians. Issue four, ideally speaking, will be out somewhere around October or November. There’s lots and lots of things that are coming out that are all just about pushing ideas. We’re returning with Origins Unknown, volume two of that one. I’m very excited. Lots of cool stuff.

GP: You are so excited when you talk about your work! Don’t apologize – I love that.

VD: I love my stuff, yes, but I love comics as a whole. So it’s always going to be something I get excited about.

GP: If you were to go to the dark side and write for someone else, what character or series would you love to write or draw for?

VD: In the weirdest way possible, I openly state that I would love to write Youngblood for Rob Liefeld. I know! No one thinks that I’m serious when I say this, but I am 100% serious! I think it has such a unique cast of characters, and I would love to get my hands on them.

GP: I love the most left-field answers, because then I’m picturing it.

VD: Yes, you’re like, “So what would you do with it?” And I’m like, yes. Exactly.

GP: Everything! That’s what you would do with it.

VD: Everything. That’s exactly what I would do. I’d have so much fun with that.

GP: Pirates, aliens, cowboys, or ninjas?

VD: Aliens. All day.

GP: Why aliens?

VD: Aliens have the most promise. Like, we know ninjas, we know what they’re capable of. We know what pirates are capable of. There’s something about aliens that’s so far reaching and open. Yes. Give me aliens all day, every day. That’s what I want.

Kiki Jenkins on Idolon, the Lesbian Crime Romance Webcomic You Should Be Reading

20150820_192532Of all the independent comics I previewed before heading to Chicago Comic-Con, Kiki Jenkins‘ Idolon is the one that made me binge read until I lost track of time. The two chapters of the webcomic posted so far are sweet schoolgirl romance – Azumanga Daioh meets Mean Girls with a sapphic twist – but Jenkins revealed in our interview that Idolon is about to take a sharp left turn, as we learn about several characters’ entanglement in a criminal underworld. In under a year, Jenkins’ memorable characters have brought her a passionate fan base, whose financial support has allowed her to produce a print version of Idolon.

Graphic Policy: Tell me a little bit about Idolon in general.

Kiki Jenkins: It’s about a girl named Cassandra. She’s been homeschooled for her entire life, very sheltered, by a very eccentric father. Her senior year of school, she gets a scholarship to attend a school with actual real live people. She meets Sam, who is sort of a girl like her except she’s very shunned by the entire school. [Cassandra] finds out later that the reason no one likes Sam is because no one likes her sister, Deanna. Deanna and her girlfriend Benny are part of this crime ring. So they’re hardened criminals, but they’re hilarious at the same time. So they’re not, like, horrible people. And [Cassandra] basically gets thrust into this life that’s completely foreign to her. But both of them learn from each other. Deanna learns to tone it back a little bit, and Cassandra learns how to come out of her shell – by living with criminals! And it’s also a love story, at the heart of that, as well.

GP: The high school and schoolgirl influences are really obvious, but also the crime story – what gave you the idea to bring those two genres together?

KJ: I just thought that would hit people really hard, that they would be reading this, like, you read the first chapter, and you’re like, “Oh, it’s a cute little schoolgirl story!” and then bam, you’re hit with these criminals, and I thought that would be a really fun juxtaposition. To explore Cassandra’s side, where she’s this schoolgirl, and also Deanna’s side, because they happen to be friends, and live in the same space, but they’re two completely different people. I didn’t get any inspiration from the criminal side from my life, but a little bit of the things they do from experiences that I’ve had. I just thought it would be really fun and really different.

test-3GP: You’re making the transition from web comic to print. How did you get that opportunity?

KJ: I got everything from my readers. I was really excited to find that I had more readers than I thought. I’m really blessed by having tons of loyal fans, readers who would be willing to buy a copy. So I did a crowdfunding for it – everything is crowdfunded. But even when it becomes published, everything will still be free, available online, because I think it’s really important that people get to read the story, and the story that I will present to people, for free. But having those loyal fans who have helped me print it, like, all of the preorders that they did, is what funded it, and I wouldn’t be where I am without them.

GP: That’s amazing, to get the fans so involved.

KJ: Absolutely, and being sort of new – the comic is only in chapter two, and to have that already is just incredible. My fans are everything. I owe everything to my readers.

GP: Are there things that the fans have suggested that you’ve put in?

KJ: Sort of. I think it’s more that they’ve guessed what will happen. People will say that they want to see Benny doing this, when that’s already planned for her. I think they’re reading, and they get a sense of who she is, and they’re like, “Oh, I hope this happens.” And it will. And lots of crazy things that people are going to expect are going to happen to all of the characters. The story is already completely planned out, but I still have room open for little suggestions, like for new characters, and things like that.

GP: One of the things that really spoke to me is this experience of young women coming out to themselves and falling in love for the first time. What is it you’re trying to put forth, especially to young female readers who might be coming out as lesbian or bisexual? What do you hope they get out of that in particular?

KJ: I hope that they see both sides of the coin. Cassandra, who hasn’t even come out to herself yet, and then Deanna, who’s just totally out there. She’s the most out person, and really blatant about it, same with Benny. I want readers to be able to see that no matter what their experiences, whether they’re a Cassandra or a Deanna, or somewhere in between, they’re not alone, and there’s always going to be someone there who has gone through it and will be able to help them through it, even if their family doesn’t approve of it. Because Deanna, her family has absolutely disowned her for it. I really want them to see that there’s different levels of being out. There’s being really out and there’s being not at all out. But whatever people are experiencing, they’re not alone. One of the characters is probably experiencing it too.

page-48GP: Since you’re self-published, you do all the writing and the art yourself. The positive side of that is, you get to do whatever you want, but the negative side is self-editing. Is there anything you thought of for the characters that you decided not to do?

KJ: So much. [Laughs] There’s so many parts when I think, oh, I’m going to do this storyline, and then I’m like, Kiki, you need to pull it back. I’ve already gone out on a limb with some of the things that Benny and Deanna will be doing that are very violent. Even then, I’ve had to have myself reel it in and self-censor myself a lot. But then when I take it to other people, like close friends that I share it with, they’re like, “No, man, you’ve got to go for it!” That’s the great thing about being self-published, and about being your own writer and artist, is that if you’re going to do it, you’d better, like, full-out, pull no punches when you do it. There’s going to be a lot of things that are really out there, but I hope it will be something that people haven’t really seen before because you can’t get away with nearly as much when you’re published by a publishing house or with someone else’s writing. It’s going to get really crazy really fast.

GP: If you could draw or write for any existing comic character or series, what would it be?

KJ: Ms. Marvel. Absolutely. I love Ms. Marvel. I love her relationship with Captain Marvel, and the fact that she’s so different from the superheroes that we see right now. She’s Muslim, she’s a woman of color, and that’s super important to me. And not only that, but she’s just like me! She writes fan fiction, and she’s super geeky, and she totally has no idea what she’s doing with her life, and she’s awesome. I’d really love to explore that. Plus, her character design is really cool. I love Ms. Marvel.

GP: I love it when somebody brings up one of my favorites. I’m like, “Yes!”

KJ: That or Spider Gwen. I love Spider Gwen too.

GP: Pirates, aliens, ninjas, or cowboys?

KJ: Ninja aliens.

GP: You only get one. Everybody wants to pick two! You get one.

KJ: Aliens. Aliens are way more fun. You’re not constricted by human experiences. You can make the craziest crap up and people will be like, “They’re aliens. It makes sense.” And that’s totally what I’m here for.

Staying “Awake” with Susan Beneville and Brian Hess

Susan and Brian

In their new ongoing series for Action Lab Entertainment, Awake, writer Susan Beneville and artist Brian Hess imagine a future where young people travel through space, saving planets in crisis – by talking to the planets directly. Susan and Brian told me all about the process of turning Brian’s fantastical vision into words and images, and how they collaborate to bring the world of Awake to life. They aim to make Awake accessible to a young adult audience but appealing to all ages, and they take pride in telling a story where compassion and cleverness are more effective than violence in solving the problems their characters face.

Graphic Policy: Just tell me a little bit about Awake.

Susan Beneville: Awake is a story about a young girl and her brother who are part of an intergalactic race of people who have the ability to communicate with planets and to wake up planets. So when a planet’s in trouble, when a planet is about to go through a natural transition, it’s the job of these children to go down to the planet and wake up the planet’s consciousness and help it through these transitions. So in our story, Regn, the young girl, has to go to this planet, and she finds out that this planet is already in complete chaos – fires, earthquakes, and tornadoes – and so she has to figure out why there’s so much chaos on this one particular planet. It’s one of the things that I was really trying to do with the comic, writing it, was to really think about the idea that a planet has a consciousness, and so one of our main characters in the series is Gremon, which is the consciousness of the planet. The planet itself is a character.

issue_1_cover copyGP: That’s really neat because we’re used to seeing spaceships as characters, but a planet as a character is taking it in a new direction. What kinds of comics or novels that came earlier influenced you in this, if anything?

SB: I don’t think I, personally, had any reference. The original idea was Brian’s.

Brian Hess: I came up with this idea. I wanted to do something for kids, and I was reading a lot of young adult graphic novels like Doug TenNapel’s Rat Fist or [Kazu Kibuishi’s] Amulet. I was also watching [Avatar: The Last Airbender] and [Legend of Korra]. This started back in 2008, so Korra wasn’t even out. And the funny thing is, one of the characters in [Awake], Operi, is this big polar bear dog. And after Korra came out, I was like, “Oh no! What did I just do? Darn it!” A lot of people were referencing that, “Oh, you just copied Korra,” and I’m like, “No, this came out quite a while ago.” We spent a lot of time – way too much time – nurturing it, getting it where it’s at today. We started this, what, two years ago now?

SB: In earnest, yeah.

BH: Really got into it two years ago, and we’re really happy with where it’s at. I really had to get over the I just need to make this kind of feeling and stop reworking it. I did the first seven pages over, what, four times?

SB: Yes.

BH: Seven times? I stopped counting after the second one. But I wanted it to look like an animated film. That was my goal. Animation, Treasure Planet was a big influence on this, stylistically, along with all of those young adult books.

GP: How did you two start working together?

SB: My cousin and I, several years ago, were hired to do a custom comic book for a big hotel chain in the Bahamas. I was writing it, and my cousin was the creative director. We hired Brian to do the artwork after some really bad experiences with other artists. We landed on Brian and he was amazing.

BH: Thank God.

SB: Seriously. Then, in 2009 or 2010, he came to me because he had this idea for Awake. At that point, I would say it was more like a vision than a full-on plot.

BH: I had some basic text in there. Literally, the first seven pages are still in the book in some form. That she did that is kind of fun for me.

SB: To honor him. But then he said, “I need to bring in a writer,” and asked me if I would write it. We sat and we talked for three or four hours, and that’s when we really started to talk about, what is the story really about? What’s the theme going to be? Who are the key characters going to be? What is it that we want them to achieve? And then I went home and wrote a treatment that was, like, twenty pages long. He looked at it, thumbs up on both sides. I started scripting, and we initially self-published last year.

BH: September 2014. So it’s been a year now, almost a year to the day since we originally launched it. We’re relaunching it with Action Lab September 16.

Page 04GP: So you’re relaunching from the beginning?

BH: Yeah, but if you did pick up the original 700-piece run that we had, we split it up in two, so that’s the first and the second issue, and we added ten new pages to each, so if you did get [the self-published version] – if you were lucky enough to get it – you do get something new.

GP: Are you hoping to have this be an ongoing, with an open run?

BH: It’s an ongoing bi-monthly series. I’ve already finished the first arc, and I’m working on the second arc.

SB: He’s doing the arc right now on issue number 5, and I’m already scripting issues 6 through 8. We are fully intending this to be an ongoing. Action Lab is absolutely committed to it and has been super supportive. I’m never quite sure if we’re allowed to say this, but we’re actually the Action Lab free comic book.

BH: We are the submission for Action Lab. We are their Free Comic Book Day submission. I’ve already finished that.

SB: It’s so cool!

BH: We literally just finished it a week ago. And if we do get in there, it’s going to be really fun. It’s my favorite issue so far. But every issue that I’ve just finished is my favorite one. I become obsessed with every page until I’m done with it.

GP: I think that’s almost a typical artistic progression. You get that, “I love what I’m doing,” and then the “I hate what I’m doing.”

SB: I feel like that’s my personal challenge, to put something in each book that’s going to be new and exciting for him to draw. And then it’s also my personal challenge to throw in a couple pages that will make him tear what’s left of his hair out.

BH: No, but the fun thing is, the way we work is, like here [points to Awake art on display in the booth], we have these two characters in a buggy, and that was just something I came up with, and she’s like, “All right, I’ve got to find a way to put this in.” And so in the second arc, the buggy turned into an ice buggy. And I love it. I love that the first arc had the hover bikes, and the second one is going to have a lot more vehicles like the snow buggy. (That isn’t spoiling anything.) I have other ideas for crazy vehicles. There’s something for everybody, you know? The little girl who’s kind of learning and growing up, and finding out where her place is, and her powers, and how to take care of herself. You have her brother Picar, who’s learning, or relearning how to use his powers, and how to take on the role that he was meant to have. And then we have all this kind of fun stuff happening on the side. It’s so much fun to have kids come up, and they’ll pick it up on a Friday and come back on a Saturday and be like, “What happens next issue?” and I’m like, “You have to wait! I’m sorry! It’s on a schedule!” And we’ll have adults who will do the same thing. It’s really fun, it’s really rewarding to go to the shows and have that instant gratification of them reading it and giving feedback.

Page 02GP: You guys lit up when I mentioned the political angle of Graphic Policy. Are there messages or ideas that you’re hoping to get across, even under the radar?

SB: I don’t feel like it’s political.

BH: It’s not environmental, either.

SB: To me, it’s more like a spiritual thing, or an emotional thing. For me personally, my politics, I’m from the Bay Area, I’m progressive. But it really is this concept that things are connected, particularly within a planet, that it manifests what we put into it. So it’s this broader idea of taking responsibility for your world. Sure, the bad guys here definitely abuse the planet and take advantage of the chaos that happens. And some of my politics is there in terms of pollution and things like that. But it’s really focused on feelings, and extremely positive in that respect. One of the things we tried to stay away from – and it’s a hard thing to do in comics – is the real easy violence. I really struggle to make sure that the way that they resolve conflict is clever, and not just, how do I use my powers to punch that guy in the face? And it’s also the idea that if you have power, it’s not that easy to use it. You have to know how to use it. You have to have the confidence to use it. Particularly because our main character is a girl. I really wanted to show that she’s struggling with it. She’s fighting her comfort level with it. And she’s the only one who can do it for herself. She has a guide who helps her, but the first two arcs are really going to be about her getting that maturity level where she becomes completely confident in her powers. And that, to me, I’m really looking forward to that. That’s going to be a beautiful thing, when she actually has the ability to say, “You know what, I’m good. I’m really good, and I have this self-esteem and this confidence.” And not everybody in the book, like her brother, they don’t all have it.

BH: It’s a good balance, too. I mean, there are fistfights in the comic. You’ll see in the second issue that comes out in November. There are straight-up fistfights. There’s a bar brawl. But it’s to show how demeaning that can be to your character, and how immature it is. And then the only other time they really get rough is at the end of the first arc, when they are literally fighting for their lives. One of them is going to be kidnapped. And I really like that it’s not violent to be violent. There’s no bad language in it. It’s really clean, and every piece of dialogue is really thoughtful. That’s one thing I like about how Susan writes – everything has a meaning. It’s not just dialogue for dialogue’s sake. And everything is building an emotion and building on character.

SB: And one of the other things that we were really trying to do was to create a book that we felt was truly an all-ages book. Because there are a lot of books that I love that are really kids’ books, and the language is a lot more simple, the story is a lot more simple. For me, I really respect every one of our readers, and I think that a book that appeals to a ten-year-old can be just as appealing to a forty-year-old. They can all have that same connection to it. We really have focused on that in terms of the level of the art, the style of the art, and the language that we use.

GP: I’m a big proponent of getting things out of the “YA ghetto,” of saying things aren’t “less than” because they’re accessible to a younger audience, and they’re not limited to that kind of audience.

BH: Yes, like, the color palette, it’s super saturated. I did that on purpose, because most comics are so monotone or duotone. I’m not knocking them, it’s just that it wouldn’t fit our story. But every colorist I talked to – that’s why I ended up coloring it by myself. I did the penciling, inking, and coloring. Now we have a wonderful colorist, her name is Darné Lang, and she’s doing a fantastic job. She did clean-ups on issues one through four, and then she started doing the full-on color on issue zero, and she’s going to be with us from now on.

GP: I know you’re putting on paper your dream idea, but if you could draw or write any existing comics character or series, what would it be?

SB: Oh, for me, it would be Batwoman.

GP: Is there a reason for that?

SB: Number one, she’s a lesbian character, and I really identify with that. I like that so far, the book has done a really nice job of crossing over the supernatural and superhero/supervillain type of thing. And I just like that her persona is, to me, sort of scratchy and edgy, and she’s not very warm. And yet when I imagine her fighting, it’s just beautiful and graceful.

GP: Brian, what would you draw?

BH: I would love to draw Guardians of the Galaxy. It’s just right up my alley. Even before the movie came out, I was really into it. That would be my dream, to draw that: a cover, or an issue, or anything. A sketch card.

GP: Last and silliest question: pirates, aliens, ninjas, or cowboys?

SB: Pirates.

BH: Not pirates. Listen, it’s cowboys and aliens.

GP: Pick one!

BH: Cowboys.

SB: Pirates all the way.

GP: There are going to be, like, pirates and cowboys fighting in the third arc.

BH: [Laughing] That’s our next comic.

Wizard World To Offer Exclusive Bandai Power Rangers Figurines at Wizard World Comic Con Chicago

Mighty Morphin Green Ranger Wizard World ChicagoWizard World, Inc. has announced that for the first time it has partnered with Bandai America Incorporated to offer an exclusive Wizard World Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Limited Edition Glow-In-The-Dark Tokyo Vinyl Green Ranger figures, Thursday through Sunday during Wizard World Comic Con Chicago at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center. With 1,500 total figures produced, only 500 will be available at Comic Con Chicago, exclusively at the Wizard World Store on the show floor, while supplies last.

The offering, a must-have for all toy collectors and Power Ranger fans, is an example of new Wizard World initiatives to offer high-end exclusive collectible figures. The Green Ranger figurines are the first Glow-in-the-Dark Tokyo Vinyl by Bandai, manufacturer and master toy licensee of some of the most popular brands in children’s toys and interactive entertainment today.

Celebrating more than 20 years of Power Rangers history, the powerful Mighty Morphin Green Ranger is now captured in a stylized, modern design as the Wizard World Power Rangers Limited Edition Glow-In-The-Dark Tokyo Vinyl Green Ranger figure. Designed by acclaimed Japanese vinyl artist Touma, this figure’s sharp angular features and oversized forearms and hands make this limited edition Ranger a statement in Tokyo pop art. This collectible figure is sixth in the series of Limited Edition Mighty Morphin Tokyo Vinyl figures and an essential piece to any Power Rangers collection.

In addition to Jason David Frank, the original Green Power Ranger, the Wizard World Comic Con Chicago celebrity lineup will include Norman Reedus, Nathan Fillion, Jeremy Renner, Stephen Amell, Burt Reynolds and dozens of others.

Wizard World Comic Con events bring together thousands of fans of all ages to celebrate the best in pop-fi, pop culture, movies, graphic novels, cosplay, comics, television, sci-fi, toys, video gaming, gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. The 15th of 24 events currently scheduled on the 2015 Wizard World calendar, Chicago show hours are Thursday, August 20, 3-8 p.m.; Friday, August 21, 12-7 p.m.; Saturday, August 22, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday, August 22, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Wizard World Comic Con Chicago is also the place for cosplay, with fans young and old showing off their best costumes throughout the event. Fans dressed as every imaginable character – and some never before dreamed – will roam the convention floor and participate in the famed Wizard World Costume Contest on Saturday night.

Dispatches From Chicago Comic-Con: Night One

bostwick rooker

Photo via Becky Smith

I’m not a big con-goer, but I probably would have bought a day pass to this year’s Wizard World Chicago Comic-Con even if I weren’t covering it for Graphic Policy. Basically, they had me at “Evil Dead reunion,” and then they put together a Firefly panel featuring Nathan Fillion, Summer Glau, and Adam Baldwin (who, despite my distaste for his politics, I can’t bring myself to hate).

But I’m just as excited about the variety of comics artists and writers – many of them part of a growing, under-appreciated Chicago indie comics scene – who will be at the con, and my dispatches will be mostly about them. I’m hoping that at least some of them will see my stylish Press wristband and chat with me about their creations.

There might also be some pictures of cosplayers.

But the focus Wednesday night, at a “Kick Off the Con” event at a bar/arcade deep in the suburbs, was on Barry Bostwick and Michael Rooker, who did Q&As with fans and press. (There was also a Pac-Man tournament, which I did not attend.) Here are some highlights from the two actors’ interviews, plus some great pictures courtesy of Becky Smith.

bostwick mike cropped MQ

Photo via Becky Smith

Graphic Policy readers are most likely to remember Barry Bostwick from Rocky Horror Picture Show, although he spent more time talking about his role on Spin City. He’s also had a long career in arch, self-referential sci-fi and horror B-movies, which he clearly loves. I wish I had realized before last night that he has starred in both FDR: American Badass and Helen Keller Vs. Nightwolves. Both sound like book reports I would have written in fifth grade, only with more kitschy violence. But he said he was most excited about his role in anthology horror movie Tales of Halloween. “I play the Devil, and I couldn’t be happier,” he said. When asked where he’d found inspiration for the role, Bostwick quipped, “You remember your first marriage.”

Michael Rooker showed up in a Call of Duty hat and began his Q&A by musing about the abundance of “beautiful white people” in Dublin. After confirming that he will return for Guardians of the Galaxy 2, he talked quite a bit about his transition from stage to screen, and about the many fans of The Walking Dead who have no idea about his long career and varied roles. He rejected a lot of the ideas about craft that were posed to him, saying he sees each role as its own entity and refusing to compare Guardians or Walking Dead to anything else he’d seen or performed in.

rooker peace crop mq

Photo via Becky Smith

Rooker stayed crotchety when a guy asked him to sign an economics textbook, saying it was possibly the weirdest thing he’d signed, and when a non-gamer tried to ask questions about the Call of Duty series. But it all seemed to come more out of protectiveness toward the roles he loves. For example, he said, “Kevin Smith didn’t even approach me for Mallrats 2, he just knew I’d do it.” Like Bostwick, Rooker seems to relish being a cult figure and resist any attempt to associate him with a particular role.

I left last night planning my Barry Bostwick and Michael Rooker movie marathons but also looking forward to focusing more on graphic media for the rest of the con.

Thanks to Wizard World for providing me with press access to Chicago Comic-Con!

Wizard World San Jose Attendees to Receive The Walking Dead #1 Cover By Colleen Doran, September 4-6

Colleen Doran The Walking Dead 1Wizard World and Skybound have announced that Sandman illustrator, The Vampire Diaries writer, and four-time Eisner Award winner Colleen Doran has drawn the 15th in a yearlong series of Limited Edition Exclusive Variant Covers of The Walking Dead #1 comic, to be provided free to all full-price attendees at Wizard World Comic Con San Jose, September 4-6.

The exclusive The Walking Dead #1 edition will be produced in extremely limited quantities and is available at registration to fans at the San Jose Convention Center only while supplies last. VIP attendees will receive an additional black & white sketch version of the comic.

Doran is the artist for a new Neil Gaiman graphic novel from Dark Horse, The Book of Lost Souls with J Michael Straczynski, Big Nemo with Alan Moore for Electricomics, and projects with Stan Lee, Matt Hawkins at Top Cow/Image, and Marvel Comics.

Doran’s recent works also include The Vampire Diaries as writer and artist for DC, as well as art for Red Sonja, script for the Korean/American fusion anthology Komacon, and the award-winning graphic novels Mangaman and Gone to Amerikay.

Doran’s hundreds of credits also include work for Lucasfilm, Random House, Scholastic, Houghton Mifflin, Simon and Schuster, and Disney. She has illustrated Amazing Spider-Man, The Teen Titans, Wonder Woman, Captain America, Superman, Sandman, and she is the sole creator of the graphic novel series A Distant Soil for Image Comics.

The Walking Dead stars attending the second annual Wizard World Comic Con San Jose include Michael Cudlitz, Emily Kinney, Josh McDermitt, Michael Rooker, and Scott Wilson. The celebrity roster also includes Bruce Campbell, Billy Boyd, Dean Cain, WWE Diva Paige , Scott Wolf, Toby Kebbell, Brett Dalton, Jason Mewes and many others.

In addition to Doran, Artist Alley in San Jose will feature Harvey Tolibao, Phil Ortiz, Michael Golden, James O’Barr, Arthur Suydam, Ethan Van Sciver, Miguel Sepulveda, Peter Bagge and more.

Wizard World Comic Con events bring together thousands of fans of all ages to celebrate the best in pop-fi, pop culture, movies, graphic novels, cosplay, comics, television, sci-fi, toys, video gaming, gaming, original art, collectibles, contests and more. The 16th of 24 events currently scheduled on the 2015 Wizard World calendar, San Jose show hours are Friday, September 4, 3 p.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday, September 5, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Sunday, September 6, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Renner, Reynolds, Amell, de Ravin, Somerhalder Q&As Highlight Programming at Wizard World Chicago, August 20-23

Jeremy RennerQ&A sessions with Jeremy Renner, Burt Reynolds, Stephen Amell, Emilie de Ravin, Ian Somerhalder, Tobin Bell, WWE Superstar Daniel Bryan and Diva Paige, Milo Ventimiglia, Caroll Spinney, Bruce Campbell, Michael Rooker, costume contests, comics-themed sessions and more are among the programming panels scheduled at Wizard World Comic Con Chicago, August 20-23 at Donald E. Stephens Convention Center. Most programming is included as part of the standard event admission.

Some highlights of the more than 120 hours of programming scheduled include:

Interactive Q&As with Renner (Sunday, 2:15 p.m.), Reynolds (Saturday, 2:15 p.m.), Amell (Saturday, noon), Ventimiglia (Friday, 5 p.m.), de Ravin (Sunday, 11:15 a.m.), Somerhalder (Saturday, 11 a.m.), Bell (Friday, 6 p.m), Spinney (Friday, 3 p.m.), Rooker (Sunday 12:30 p.m.), Kristy Swanson (Sunday, 2:30 p.m.), Brett Dalton (Saturday, 4 p.m.), Scott Wilson (Friday, 4 p.m.), Jodie Sweetin (Saturday, 6 p.m.) and others

  • Dual Q&A sessions with “Serenity”/Firefly trio Nathan Fillion, Summer Glau , and Adam Baldwin (Saturday, 3 p.m.), “Doctor Who” duo Billie Piper and Arthur Darvill (Sunday, 11:30 a.m.), survive the streets of Gotham with Ben McKenzie and Sean Pertwee (Sunday, 1:15 p.m.), and The Boondock Saints tandem Sean Patrick Flanery and David Della Rocco (Sunday, noon)
  • Evil Dead I & II reunion hosted by Campbell, featuring Danny Hicks, Betsy Baker, Sarah Berry, Kassie De Paiva, Ted Raimi and others (Saturday, 5 p.m.)
  • Screenings of “Supergirl” presented by CBS 2 (Saturday, 1 p.m.) and “Scream Queens” presented by FOX 32 (Saturday, 2:30 p.m.)
  • Join the master of horror, Eli Roth and the star of The Green Inferno, Lorenza Izzo , for an exclusive preview of the film (Sunday, 2 p.m.)
  • Go to Hell and Back with comedian Nick Swardson (Saturday, 5:30 p.m.)
  • Meet & Greet with Ian Somerhalder, Damon Salvatore himself (Saturday, 10 a.m.) (Paid event)
  • World Of Warcraft Composer Jason Hayes and his video game tribute band ‘Critical Hit’ perform original arrangements and electrifying live concerts of music from the most celebrated videogames of all time (Saturday, 6:30 p.m.)
  • Comics-themed sessions with Tom Cook (Saturday, 4:30; Sunday, noon), storytelling with Michael Golden (Saturday, 4 p.m.), learn how to write comics with “Green Arrow’s” Mike Grell, “Billy Dogma’s” Dean Haspiel and “Archie’s” Barbara Slate, “Batman Adventures’” Ty Templeton and “Spider-Man’s” Danny Fingeroth (Saturday, 5:30 p.m.), “Beloved Villains” with Genese Davis, Adam G. Simon, Eric Kieron Davis (Friday, 6:30 p.m.), and others
  • CONtv Presents a Q&A session with Green Power Ranger Jason David Frank (“Mighty Morphin Power Rangers”) (Saturday, 3 p.m.). Then join him for the ‘Green Power Ranger Half-Hour of Power’ karate class for all ages (Sunday, 1:30 p.m.)
  • Step into the ring with WWE® Superstar Daniel Bryan™ (Thursday, 8 p.m.), WWE® Diva Paige™ (Friday, 7 p.m.)
  • Costume contests for adults (Saturday, 7 p.m.) and kids (Sunday, 3:30 p.m.), plus cosplay-themed sessions with Wizard World personality Damian Beurer (Thursday, 7 p.m.) and other
  • Meet-and-greets with Jason David Frank (Saturday, 5:30 p.m./Sunday 11 a.m.) (Paid events)

Unless noted, programming events take place in the designated General Programming Rooms at the Greater Chicago Convention Center. VIP tickets or additional costs may apply to ensure access to select activities, as noted.

A full list of Wizard World Chicago Comic Con programming is available online.

Bruce Campbell’s Horror Film Festival Adds Two More Premieres

bruce campbell's horror film festival 2015The second annual Bruce Campbell Horror Film Festival presented by Wizard World, running August 20 – 23 at the Muvico Theater in Rosemont, Illinois (9701 Bryn Mawr Ave., Rosemont), has announced the addition of two more films to the already bursting schedule.

June, starring Casper Van Dien and Kennedy Brice, tells the story of nine-year-old June (Brice), who has been shuffled in and out of foster homes for years. Though she tries to be good, no matter where she goes a trail of chaos and terror seems to follow. It’s only when June is sent to live with a new couple, Lily and Dave (Van Dien) that it looks as if things might finally work out. Except this innocent child with the face of an angel is possessed by an ancient, malevolent entity that has hijacked her soul. June enjoys its North American Premiere on Friday August 21.

On Sunday August 23, JeruZalem will hold its U.S. Premiere. Two American girls on vacation follow a mysterious and handsome anthropology student on a trip to Jerusalem. The party is cut short when the trio are caught in the middle of a biblical apocalypse. Trapped between the ancient walls of the holy city, the three travelers must survive long enough to find a way out as the fury of hell is unleashed upon them. JeruZalem is directed by Doron Paz and Yoav Paz, and stars Yael Grobglas, Yon Tumarkin and Danielle Jadelyn.

Films will screen at the Muvico Rosemont 18, 9701 Bryn Mawr Ave., mere blocks from the Wizard World convention hall. Screenings are free for Wizard World Comic Con Chicago badge-holders (space permitting), and a limited number of festival badges and single tickets are available for fans who are not registered for Wizard World.

Festival badges are on sale for $66.60, and single screening tickets are available for $12.

Is Wizard World About to Get New Owners? (Updated)

wizard worldIs Wizard World Comic Con about to get new owners? Arriving in our inbox not long ago was a message concerning the convention/geek box/content provider to pause any affiliate links we might have linking to the company.

Affiliate links are one way to monetize links/products promoted (and we do disclose it when a post contains them).

The email cites “transferring ownership” as the reason to pause the campaign. Here’s the full email:

Wizard World Comic Con (MID: 5972) has to pause its affiliate program for the time being due to the merchant transferring ownership.

Please stop your campaigns until further notice. We will be providing new links within the next few days to begin promoting the merchant again.

Thank you for your efforts in promoting this merchant. We apologize for the lack of notice regarding this down time, but this is only ever done in extenuating circumstances.

Please be on the look out for updates on the program’s re-launch.

Wizard World Inc. is a publicly traded company and during their first quarter filing for 2015 announced while they had convention revenue of $6,101,429 they had a loss of $981,941 for the quarter and working capital of $2,496,995

We’ve asked Wizard World Inc. for clarification and a statement.

Updated: We’ve heard from Wizard World, and the only change being made is with the management of the affiliate program. Nothing to see here. Move along.

ComicConBox To Include Exclusive DC Comics 1993’s The Batman Adventures #12 Variant

The Batman Adventures #12 - BatGirl Day One VariantComicConBox, a premium subscription-based monthly box service from Wizard World that delivers Comic Con to fans, will include a limited edition exclusive DC Comics variant cover The Batman Adventures #12 – BatGirl: Day One in their next box. Fans can order this variant at ComicConBox.com.

This iconic variant comic, originally released in September 1993, displays Barbara Gordon dressed up as Batgirl for a costume party, which is crashed by Harley Quinn, Poison Ivy, and Catwoman. Most notably, this is the first comic book appearance of Harley Quinn. The variant cover art, by Rick Burchett, also pays homage to DC Comics cover of Tango with Evil by Alex Ross.

There is a limited supply of The Batman Adventures #12 – BatGirl: Day One variants, and once sold out, they will never be republished. This month’s ComicConBox will also be filled with other licensed DC Comics products (toys, artwork, etc.).

The service, priced at $29.99 per month plus shipping, with no contractual commitment, will also feature Epic Grand Prizes in random boxes.

Packages will be sent to U.S. members on or around the first week of each month.

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