Category Archives: Mini Reviews

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 10/24

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

X-Men #13 (Marvel)– With Apocalypse on the verge of death, Jonathan Hickman and Mahmud Asrar go deep into his past and look into his familial connection with Arakko. It’s a lot of table-setting, magical, fantasy backstory stuff from Hickman, but it’s nice to see Apocalypse vulnerable for once, both in the past and present. It all builds to a nearly-cinematic sequence of him picking up his old, very huge blade in an Egyptian pyramid and ruminating about survival of the fittest. Having one of the X-Men’s greatest foes taking lead against their new enemy adds a general factor to both this issue and the first couple chapters of X of Swords. However, I’ll admit my eyes glazed over a little bit during the flashback sequences as X-Men #13 rounds out a middling week for X of Swords. The characters look cool and have badass names, but I don’t have an emotional connection to them yet. Overall: 6 Verdict: Pass

Tales from the Umbrella Academy: You Look Like Death #2 (Dark Horse)– Even though it features emotionally heart-rending flashbacks, the specters of Hollywood stars past, and hard drug use, You Look Like Death #2 is a bit of a comedown from the first installment of the Klaus Hargreeves solo series. Writers Gerard Way and Shaun Simon and artist INJ Culbard go down lots of rabbit holes in this issue and spend almost as much time on the chimpanzee vampire Shivers taking over the Hollywood vampire underworld as on Klaus hitting the town. There’s a kind of flat, unreality to Culbard’s art that works for a world that is a little bit, well, off. His best work comes in flashbacks of Reginald Hargreeves traumatizing Klaus to unleash his great potential, and Way and Simon find a throughline between this trauma and his current con-man ways and substance abuse. You Look Like Death #2 doesn’t have the high-wire energy of the first issue of the series, but Way, Simon, and Culbard start to develop the character who would be the most charismatic member of the Umbrella Academy cast even if the Shivers sequences aren’t as exciting. Overall: 7.9 Verdict: Buy

King Tank Girl #1 (Albatross)**- Tank Girl’s move to Albatross Funnybooks (Home of Eric Powell’s Goon) has writer Alan Martin and artist Brett Parson channeling her Deadline days with a series of funny pop culture riff stories. The lead story, which has Booga looking for a rare, treasured action figure (Based on the Kenner Boba Fett) and Tank Girl accidentally being King of England, is the best of the bunch with lots of visual and verbal humor. Another favorite is a one-off story about a shoe sale, and Martin and Parson also make fun of surf culture turning a straightforward action story into something utterly absurd. Filled with silly puns, faces, and even some explosions, King Tank Girl #1 is just a general good time. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Iron Man #2 (Marvel)– Christopher Cantwell and Cafu really seem to be having a good time putting retro-suit wearing Tony Stark through the wringer in Iron Man #2 while giving a glimpse at the legit Big Bad behind the scenes. Tony’s death wish is on display this whole comic as he lets Arcade capture him so he can get his ass kicked by Absorbing Man and then breaks almost every bone in his body rescuing some Stark Unlimited employees. Cafu’s art is slick and fluid, especially during the action sequences, but he also nails how out of sorts Tony is and the total snark and contempt that Hellcat has for him. Her calling out Tony’s behavior and the lack of any romantic element in their relationship is definitely the best part of Cantwell and Cafu’s Iron Man so far. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Edgar Allan Poe’s Snifter of Blood #1 (Ahoy)– Ahoy’s all-star horror anthology with an inebriated American author host is back with Paul Cornell and Russ Braun doing an adaptation of Poe’s “Black Cat” (But with a dog). There’s also Dean Motter spinning a yarn about Poe’s fictional paleontologist buddy Atlas that turns into a battle between science and faith, truth and con artistry, and eventually, good versus evil. Thankfully, a hammered Poe is there to break the tension between stories, but “Black Dog” is fairly traumatizing thanks to Cornell telling the story from the dog’s POV and Braun’s straightforward, even-keeled art. “Atlas Shrugged” is a little more complex, but Motter’s eye for design and ability to draw shifty figures suits a story with a cast of characters that includes luminaries like Poe and PT Barnum as well earnest scientists and overbearing fire and brimstone preaching. Motter letters the story too and adds to the accusatory tone of some of the cast with intense use of fonts. In addition to these two comics, there are also some interesting illustrated prose stories to make this worth your purchase, especially during the Halloween season. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Werewolf By Night #1 (Marvel) – I’d had some high hopes for this debut and direction for the classic series/character. The overall concept has some good ideas but the end overall product falls short. The comic feels like a forgettable release from the 90s. It’s not bad but also doesn’t excite. It’d be a comic I’d have read in 15 minutes, shrugged my shoulders then moved on to the next comic in the pile. The interesting aspect is the tie-in to the Outlawed storyline but the dialogue is a bit cheesy at moments and some art makes little sense. There’s a lot of potential with the direction of the series to start but the end result feels like a story we’ve seen too many times before and doesn’t take advantage of the potentially interesting perspective and views of the writers and artists. Lots of potential not taken advantage of. Overall Rating: 6.5 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 10/17

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Rorschach #1 (DC/Black Label)– First, I have to give kudos to Tom King for digging into the “pirate comics” of Watchmen and their creators. Also, to Jorge Fornes for working with a 12 panel grid and not just a 9 panel one. But, it’s safe to say that Rorschach #1 was a snooze of a read. There are some interesting ideas floating around like eccentric superhero collectors, actual real world comics creators doing seances, and political rivalries, but King and Fornes fail at giving readers a character to latch onto for future issues. They riff and tease, but don’t really do anything with the venerable Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons source material. Plain and simple, Rorschach #1 is boring, not controversial, and honestly, that’s worse in my book. Overall: 5.0 Verdict: Pass

The Vain #1 (Oni Press)– Eliot Rahal, Emily Pearson, and Fred Stresing turn in a funny, sexy 1940s riff on vampire stories in The Vain #1. Rahal and Pearson give the four leads a shit ton of charisma and big queer energy as they cross the United States stealing blood and finding a place where they can live the good life. This is in contrast with the milquetoast FBI agent trying to track them down. Vampires robbing banks is a fun enough premise, but the conclusion of issue one reveals this series’ real, historically connected premise. And it’s even better. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Grendel, Kentucky #2 (AWA/Upshot)**- Grendel, Kentucky #2 has visually striking art and letters from Tommy Lee Edwards and John Workman, but Jeff McComsey’s script is a bit sluggish. More so, since this comic is set to wrap up in two more issues. McComsey and Edwards establish the scale and frightening nature of the monster on the outskirts of the motorcycle club/weed baron’s land, mostly, through the effects of his actions. There’s some half-assed X-Files stuff with police investigating the patriarch Clyde’s death and a cast of supporting characters that are introduced and immediately offed. Edwards’ visuals definitely transport Beowulf to Appalachia (Sadly, the drug the family would sell/produce would be meth or heroin, not weed though.), but there isn’t much of a story to go with them. Overall: 6.0 Verdict: Pass

Warhammer 40,000: Marneus Calgar #1 (Marvel)– This was my first experience with anything Warhammer 40K-related, and Marneus Calgar #1 was a definitely accessible take on this popular franchise from Kieron Gillen and Jacen Burrows. They introduce a totally dystopian world with big combat armor, buckets of blood, frightening monsters, lots of religious references, and dark humor around the edges. (I chuckled every time they mentioned certain planets’ life expectancy.) Plotwise, Marneus Calgar #1 is part origin story, part cosmic horror tale showing the titular character’s rise from rich kid to hardened Ultramarine. As a newcomer to the world, I liked the focus on a singular character. Finally, I would be remiss without praising Burrows’ versatile art as he nails everything from the details of weapons to some space marines-in-training’s joyful, yet terrified reactions to their beyond-hard-ass drill instructor’s sayings. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Hellions #5 (Marvel)– Hellions #5 throws a spanner in the fetch quest-y works of the X of Swords crossover. Zeb Wells and Carmen Carnero set Mr. Sinister and his Hellions (With a newly grumpy and resurrected Empath) on a suicide mission to retrieve all the swords and avoid the tournament with Arakko. The utter dysfunctionality and eccentricity of the team has made Hellions an entertaining read, and the higher stakes of X of Swords brings it to another level. Mr. Sinister constantly commenting on cuts of capes will never not be hilarious, and he and the team get to match wits with Jamie Braddock in this issue. With the exception of a gross resurrection scene in the beginning, Hellions #5 is more backstabbing and blackmailing than out and out violence. But that’s okay because Carnero is great at showing the quick glances, side eyes, and groans from more upright characters like Psylocke and Havok that fill this darkly funny and downright hopeless take on the typical fantasy quest narrative. Overall: 8.9 Verdict: Buy

New Mutants #13 (Marvel)– Doug Ramsey already has his sword (It’s his buddy, Warlock) so Ed Brisson and the always impressive Rod Reis spend this issue looking at his fears about participating in the tournament as well as his relationships with Magik, Warlock, and Krakoa. The sparring sessions between Magik and Doug have a wonderful energy to them while still showing that Doug’s skill will always be with languages and not combat. Reis uses a welcoming, green palette to show the close relationship between Krakoa and Doug and demonstrate that the mutants would go from being in harmony to basically parasites if he was to die in the tournament. Brisson also continues some of the scheming from Hellions as Exodus is skeptical both about Sinister’s mission and Doug’s chances in the tournament. All in all, New Mutants #13 is a strong character study for one of the most underrated mutants and has gorgeous art, especially when Reis evokes Bill Sienkiewicz in his depiction of Warlock. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Cable #5 (Marvel)– In Cable #5, Gerry Duggan and Phil Noto send the Summers family to space to deal with a figure of cosmic terror that has wiped out all of SWORD agents at The Peak space station. There’s a chance for Noto to flex his horror muscles, some family bonding, and lots of various types of energy blasts. Also, Scott gets to have some important conversations with Cable about how maybe he’s too inexperienced to wield a sword in the upcoming tournament. So far, everything in both love and war has gone Cable’s way, and it seems like Duggan is setting him or his family up for a big setback in the upcoming tournament. You know something’s off when Cyclops is utterly confident. Even though this comic has a very “side quest” vibe to it, Duggan and Noto do succeed in creating some tension for the upcoming tournament and showing that Jonathan Hickman doesn’t totally have the market cornered on the Summerses. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 10/10

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Norse Mythology #1 (Dark Horse)– Retellings of Norse myths with punchy prose from Neil Gaiman and wonderful art from P. Craig Russell, Mike Mignola, and Jerry Ordway makes picking up this comic a no-brainer. Russell handles layouts, scripting, and draws the first story, which establishes the Nine Realms and Yggdrasil in glorious fashion. Mignola and colorist Dave Stewart draw the second story, which is both weird and archetypal, as Odin sacrifices his eye to gain wisdom. A burst of red really emphasizes the pain he feels. Finally, the book wraps up with Ordway drawing a humorous story of Thor, Loki, and dwarves. He, Russell, and Gaiman have fun with the rivalry between brothers, and there’s even a cliffhanger. Overall: 9.0 Verdict: Buy

Getting It Together #1 (Image)– In Getting It Together, Sina Grace, Omar Spahi, Jenny D. Fine, and Mx. Struble service a fun genre that gets no love from monthly comics: slice of life. Grace and Spahi craft an HBO dramedy-worthy premise of a messy breakup, but the couple share a best friend/sibling named Jack that makes it even messier. They also distract from the heterosexuality for a minute to have a fun, if kind of painful subplot as Jack’s date turns out to be totally shady. Fine and Struble are a versatile art team who can do everything from high energy rooftop gigs to passionate sex scenes and especially interpersonal conflict. Getting It Together is a comic that looks good, has interesting relationship dynamics, and doesn’t take itself too seriously. Overall: 8.3 Verdict: Buy

Champions #1 (Marvel)- After long delays, Eve Ewing and Simone Di Meo’s incarnation of the teen superhero team, Champions, is here, and it’s honestly worth the wait. The cast of characters is sprawling, but Ewing wisely uses Miles Morales as a POV character to show how the outlawing of teen vigilantes affects regular teens in the Marvel universe. And, then, she and Di Meo get down to the action featuring a mixed bag of panels with interesting shapes and “camera angles” that don’t clearly show the fighting moves and superpowers. However, premise and plot-wise, Champions comes off as a more intelligent and progressive take on Marvel’s Civil War with Ewing (Via Kamala Khan) wisely writing that sometimes older generations don’t understand what younger generations want or need. She even throws in some clever moments like all the “good” superhero mentors being taken, which makes sense because a good hero like a good teacher or professor sadly has limited time in their day. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Adventureman #4 (Image)– Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson’s pulp pastiche-meets-domestic drama comes to a crescendo in Adventureman #4. Our protagonist, Claire, has been acting a lot more like the titular hero from expanding physically to helping hapless tourists and showing superhuman abilities. The Dodsons’ art matches this energy and also provide a glimpse at why she is behaving this way as well as a possible solution at protecting reality from something straight out of Gnostic writings. (Or a Grant Morrison comic.) I feel like “hypercaffeinated” is a good descriptor for Adventureman #4 as Fraction and the Dodsons introduce concepts, flashbacks, and character at a mile a minute pace. It’s overwhelming at times, but has kinetic art and solid foundational themes like found family and being forgotten being worse than death as reality and the Connells/Adventure Inc starts to bridge together. Overall: 7.4 Verdict: Read

Marauders #13 (Marvel)– Vita Ayala and Matteo Lolli craft a really exciting Storm solo comic as she takes a little road trip to Wakanda to get the Skybreaker sword for her upcoming fight with the Arakko. Marauders #13 captures all the sides of Ororo’s personality: thief, goddess, hero, mutant, and African woman. Ayala also writes one hell of a Shuri as she paints a pretty bleak picture of what removing the Wakandans’ most sacred happen would do to her family and the country. Conversely, Storm not taking the sword would be the end of Krakoa and (let’s get dramatic here) the world. Lolli’s art for the conversational back and forth is serviceable, but he really hits a new level for the bittersweet heist that Storm pulls with speed lines, lightning blasts, and a look of disappointment on both Ororo and T’challa’s faces when they realize what she’s done. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Marauders #13 (Marvel) – The strongest chapter of the X of Swords event mostly because there’s some meat here. An issue focused on Storm’s retrieving her sword from Wakanda, the most interesting aspect is the moral/political issues it brings up. The comic is a lot of debate between Shuri and Storm about the priorities of a nation and “best interest” with some potential long term impact. A rather blah caper is wrapped up in a debate about national interests. The art is a little all over but the depth of the comic and it’s underlying theme is what stands out. Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Rise of Ultraman #2 (Marvel) – What exactly is Ultraman? For those unfamiliar with the classic manga/anime property this issue gets things really going and explains the missing pieces of the first issue. It also sets up some mystery and conspiracy as to who the heroes really are. For someone new to the property, I’m digging it. Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Snake Eyes: Deadgame #2 (IDW Publishing) – I really enjoyed the first issue of the series but this second issue falls into problems Liefeld comics tend to have. The concepts are much better than the execution. There’s potentially some great stuff here but the story is a bit choppy, nonsensical at times, and mostly about the visuals. There’s also an issue of designs that feel like they’d fit right at home with his work on X-Force and Youngblood. All these years later, they’re a bit dated. Though, red suit Snake Eyes looks pretty cool. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Wolverine #6 (Marvel) – Wolverine’s quest for his sword begins here and then continues in X-Force. It’s a drawn out at times confusing issue that feels like it’s delaying getting to the interesting stuff in the next chapter of X of Swords. You could skip this issue and not miss much at all. Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

X-Force #13 (Marvel) – The second part of Wolverine getting his sword is much more interesting than the first part of Wolverine #6. The issue has some interesting interaction between Wolverine and his foe as we learn more about Solem who might actually be a challenge. It’s clear at some point Solem will get a face turn and become someone who’s in Wolverine’s orbit as a side character, their interactions are too good not to. But, overall, this just shows that this part of X of Swords could have been wrapped up in an issue instead of spread out in two. Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 10/3

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

The Immortal Hulk: The Threshing Place #1 (Marvel) – A pretty solid one-shot comic that has some depth to it. That’s not surprising as Jeff Lemire takes over the writing and his comics usually have a little more to them. The art by Mike Del Mundo with colors by Marco D’Alfonso is fantastic with an almost painted quality about it. I’m not often a fan of one-shots as they just feel like throwaway money grabs but this really stands out for its overall quality. There’s some action, heart, and solid art. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Zombies Resurrection #2 (Marvel) – Perfect timing for the Halloween season, the second issue takes us to surprising locations with some twists I didn’t expect at all. The series is delivering something new for the well-worn line of comics and hopefully this prompts Marvel to deliver a new mini-series with a new creative team each year, though this team is great. If you like “zombie” stories, this is well worth checking out. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

X-Factor #4 (Marvel) – The first chapter of X of Swords left me wanting. I immediately focused on its giant holes and questionable decisions made by characters. This second chapter feels like it’s an attempt to fill in the plot issues that the X-Men’s new direction has, namely resurrection. There’s now some stakes in that which is long overdue and brings some actual threats to the situation, but even then only slightly. While I like the blending of the swords and sorcery and X-Men, so far, this is an event that isn’t as earth-shattering or even good as events long time past. While not a bad story so far, it’s also not quite as exciting as hyped or I hoped. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Transformers #23 (IDW Publishing) – I took a break from this new Transformers run as its focus on a murder mystery instead of the more interesting political unrest was rather frustrating. With a title of “Rise of Decepticons” I decided to check out this issue as it was clear Megatron and his faction were going to make their political power known. Sadly, the story and events are pretty paint-by-number and predictable and seen in far too many films and shows. It reminds me how smart the previous volume was in its handling of politics and leaves me debating to continue or maybe tune back in farther down the road. Overall Rating: 6.5 Recommendation: Read

Logan

X-Factor #4 (Marvel)– Leah Williams and Carlos Gomez immediately deal with the effects of X of Swords: Creation, namely, the deaths of Rockslide and Rictor and the mortal wounding of Apocalypse by his own children. Because this is technically an issue of X-Factor, Williams tells the story from Polaris’ POV as her guilt for what happened to Rockslide and in her insecurity around her father only intensifies when the resurrection protocols have a big time glitch. This whole resurrection thing has been too good to be true, and kudos to Williams and Gomez for showing that there are flaws in the system, especially where Otherworld is concerned, and giving the upcoming tournament arc a boost. X-Factor #4 raises the stakes of X of Swords, and Gomez’s art matches the almost shonen manga-meets-high fantasy plotting of Williams. Yeah, there’s a prophecy, and also a data page fleshing it out. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

X-Ray Robot #2 (Dark Horse)– Mike Allred’s art paired with Laura Allred’s colors as well as his depiction of traveling through parallel realities are groovy and fun to look at. However, they are weighed down by Allred’s exposition-ridden writing. He spends most of the issue re-explaining the premise of the series and making it more and more complicated when it’s really Back to the Future with a side of robots and multiverse. It makes for really frustrating reading, which is too bad because Allred is one of the great comics storytellers. Overall: 5.6 Verdict: Pass


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 9/26

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

X of Swords: Creation #1 (Marvel)- Jonathan Hickman and Tini Howard take simmering plotlines from their X-Men and Excalibur titles and turn them onto a full boil in the first installment of the X of Swords crossover. The extra length allows for both table setting and dynamic action from artist Pepe Larraz. Hickman and Howard are juggling a huge cast, but still have time for pivotal character moments especially where Apocalypse is concerned. Maybe, he’s not as much of a gamer as he thought he was in Excalibur. Apocalypse’s family connection to Arakko makes them a tad more interesting than generic cool looking baddies a la Black Order, and Howard and Hickman make a smart story decision by countering them with the Summers family. Finally, X of Swords: Creation #1 is a successful example of genre fusion with Hickman, Howard, and Larraz crafting a science fantasy epic that just happens to have fan-favorite mutants as the stars with relationships established over a year of Dawn of X. Overall: 9.0 Verdict: Buy

Autumnal #1 (Vault)– Autumnal #1 is excellent slow-burn, fish out of water horror from writer Daniel Kraus and artist Chris Shehan. Kat and Sybil are a mother and daughter who have been through some shit (Much of the first part of the comic is set in a principal’s office.), but they love each other deeply. In this comic, they ended up heading to idyllic New Hampshire from Chicago when Kat’s distant mother left her the house. Shehan and colorist Jason Wordie show both beauty and decay in this town while going for more realism in showing Kat and Sybil’s interactions. Kraus spends a lot of time establishing their relationship and personalities from Sybil’s IED and intelligence to Kat’s recovery from addiction and past as a musician before throwing them into the rural, ritual weirdness. I’ll follow these anti-Gilmore Girls duo into any nook, cranny, or autumn leaf in this series. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Wicked Things #5 (BOOM!)– John Allison and Max Sarin find great balance between Lottie trying to solve an elaborate series of casino robberies and her friend Claire actually interacting with the premise of the series aka trying to find out who framed her. Sarin’s gift for hilarious gestures and body language in Giant Days still translates to Wicked Things with Lottie’s reactions and general swaggering when she beats her probation-mate/ex-con Bulldog in chess. In its five issues, Wicked Things has gone down a lot of tangents from cellphone scams to Lottie being the tea/coffee girl at the police station, but they are infinitely amusing. I’m sad to see this one conclude next issue. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Dark Nights: Death Metal Speed Metal #1 (DC Comics) – An interesting comic that feels more a meta commentary to fans of Wally West than the story itself. There’s a lot of “righting the wrong” as Wally and Barry have it out as they’re on the run and it’s clear Wally is going to be a big part of whatever is to come but unless you’re really invested in the character(s) then the issue is a little… meh. As a chapter to the event, it’s fine and likely fills in gaps we won’t see elsewhere but it’s very much for the Wally West fans. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Elana

Dracula Motherf*cker (Image) We need hyper lurid vivid horror comics. We need badass feminist takes on the Dracula story. We need this gorgeous new book from Alex de Campi and Erica Henderson. Henderson, who you know from Squirrel Girl but hopefully don’t only know from Squirrel Girl, has a style that Is incredibly versitle with cinemascope panels, visionary monsters and period perfect styling and fashion. And everyone knows de Campi is the queen of grindhouse comics with emotional bite that tell stories you haven’t seen before. Did I mention this comic largely takes place in 1974? Absolutely loved this book.


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 9/19

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Iron Man #1 (Marvel)– Color me interested in an Iron Man comic for the first time since Matt Fraction left the title. Christopher Cantwell and Cafu craft a comic that is both vintage and forward-thinking with Tony Stark leaving the Stark Unlimited, selling his penthouse, moving to New York, and street racing and fighting Silver Age villains with Hellcat in tow. Cantwell cleverly uses social media as a snarky Greek chorus to dog all of Tony’s moves in this comic as he tries to be humble and reinvent himself, but ends up falling back on his old tricks. With the help of Hellcat’s snark and take no bullshit attitude, Cantwell pushes back on Tony’s privilege and usually way of doing things. We’ll see if he ends up breaking the mold with his run. Finally, Cafu’s visuals makes everything look sleek and old school like a classic car show and makes Alex Ross’ redesign/throwback design look gorgeous in action. Overall: 8.8 Verdict: Buy.

Overwatch-Tracer: London Calling #1 (Dark Horse)– I’ve played Overwatch once, but this digital comic from writer Mariko Tamaki and artists Babs Tarr, Heather Danforth, and Hunter Clark is more punk rock than video game with a simple, yet charming tale of human/robot conflict. With Overwatch disbanded, Tracer is getting restless stopping petty crime in England having noodles with her girlfriend. However, Tamaki lobs an obstacle in the forms of the Omnics, who are in conflict with humanity, but they both like old punk bands? Tarr’s art brings maximum cuteness for the smooching and finding common ground in tunes while Clark sets up her nicely for the zippy fast action scenes that are capture the speed of the multiplayer video game. But more cartooning. Tracer London Calling isn’t a masterpiece, but it’s a charming licensed comic with top-notch visuals. Overall: 7.8 Verdict: Read

Excalibur #12 (Marvel)– Tini Howard does some big moves on the ol’ plot board, and Marcus To gets to draw better versions of characters envisioned by Rob Liefeld, namely, the Externals in this issue of Excalibur. Most of the focus is on Apocalypse and his coven and the sacrifices they make while Rogue and Gambit have to deal with the consequences. Betsy Braddock is also out here trying to prove that she is the real Captain Britain to Saturnyne, and yes, Excalibur #12 has a lot of plots. But mostly it’s nice to see Apocalypse go back to his own ways, albeit, in a more magical/paving the way for a big crossover event way. Overall: 7.5 Verdict: Read

Brett

Batman #99 (DC Comics) – The best issue of the “Joker War” so far as Batman finally assembles his crew to take things on. It’s a bit slow as far as action but it’s that key moment when Batman gets his head out of his ass building off last issues “get up Rock” moment. It’s a piece of the bigger puzzle but a vast improvement on an event that has been relatively underwhelming. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Hellions #4 (Marvel) – While it’s gotten away from the concept of restorative justice, this is still one of my favorite two X-books right now. The series has nailed a nice action/horror vibe to it but also underneath the action there’s some great concepts of society’s abuse of “criminals” and their being exploited. It’s surface might be more of the classic X-Men but it also has the heart of exploring real world issues underneath the kick-ass visuals and fun dialogue. Overall Rating: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

Seven Secrets #2 (BOOM! Studios) -The second issue of the series is an interesting one as it kind of feels like a first issue. While the debut focused on Caspar’s parents, this issue now shifts things to Caspar. It’s a very different start of a comic and very unexpected as you’d expect the second issue to really pick up from the action of the first issue. The playing with that expectation makes this an intriguing series just for that but it’s a good story, interesting characters and world, and great art… all of that helps too. Overall Rating: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Slaughterhouse-Five (BOOM! Studios/Archaia) – I’m not much of a prose reader by Kurt Vonnegut is a writer who I have read multiple of his books and enjoyed them all. Sadly, it’s been over 20 years since I’ve done that… so I don’t remember this one at all beyond the war and time travel. How it compares to the classic book, I couldn’t say, but I thoroughly enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation which is full of the humor I remember and the interesting anti-war message. Add is some great visuals which adds to the laughs, it’s a solid read no matter how close they got to the original material. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 9/12

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Joe Hesh

Amazing Spider-Man #48 (Marvel) It doesn’t matter how many issues or how many volumes, one thing remains: Peter Parker is still Peter Parker. That means Peter Parker is Spider-Man. This issue dealt with Peter frontline and all his tremendous guilt and weight he carries with him. He is in constant battle between his wants and his morals. He wants to make the right choice always but the right choice is never easy. His conundrum? Does he let his old foe The Sin Eater who has returned from the dead with a holy crusade using new powers to clear sins away, cleanse Peter’s greatest enemy: The Green Goblin aka Iron Patriot aka Director of SWORD aka The Red Goblin aka Norman Osborn, or does he save Norman from this fate? Issues like this make me love Spider-Man so much. He really is the worlds most altruistic hero. No matter how much pain you put him through or what you take from him, he is always unwaivering in his principles. Peter leans on his web friends for some internal guidance and it is here the issue shines. Miles, Gwen, Spider-Woman all take a stab at the Parker psyche and we get some very cool and fun moments. If you’re a long time reader you have a good idea on what Peter’s choice is and thats where the fun begins leading us right into the big 850th issue next. Art chores were done by the amazing Mark Bagley and the scribe was Nick Spencer who is finally making Spidey something worth reading again. All the while here I’m waiting for something Goblin to come. Next issue should be a blast. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Batman: Three Jokers #1 (DC) We’ve waited so long for this one and wow. Wow. Wow. Wow. It did not disappoint. I wasn’t sure how this was going to work with three possible Jokers and what not. I thought some multiverse shenanigans or such but after reading this, I think not. The story plays out brilliantly pacing all kinds of lush character developments at the same time as a jog down memory lane. The Joker has always been so fascinating as there is so many interpretations of him. I’ve always been a fan of Grant Morrisons metamorphosis portrayal where he amps up to meet whatever Batman is putting out at the time. In other words the better Batman is, the worse Joker becomes. However after reading this and a very different direction my thoughts might change. I know we are only on issue one but this could be the story of the year for me. An all around gorgeous presentation. Speaking of which, the art. The freaking art man. It’s breathtaking.  I know Jason Fabok might have started as a Jim Lee clone but to me, he has surpassed Lee. The line work, the difference of character design, the bombastic large fight scenes, it is really too impressive to quantify. Now Geoff Johns the man who has brought us the best and worst DC has to offer (I.E. Green Lantern and Infinite Crisis) he crushes it this time. Right out the gate, grand slam on first pitch. I don’t know where he is going with this yet, but I cannot wait. Not only does he handle the mystery well but he gives Jason and Barbara some of the best character work they’ve had in years. I loved it. So if you weren’t planning to read this book, you better change that. Canon or no canon this is an amazing story. Don’t sleep on it, lest a stray crowbar wake you to your senses. Score: 9.8 Reccomendation: Buy

Logan

Vampire the Masquerade #2 (Vault)- In Tim Seeley and Devmalya Pramanik’s A-story, most of the big plot points are dashed out via exposition, but the real draw is the relationship between Cecilia and her vampire “childe” (She was sired and left for dead actually) Ali. They demonstrate that the life of a vampire in this world is full of moral dilemmas and bureaucracy in contrast with the pure survival instincts of the Anarchs in Tini Howard, Blake Howard, and Nathan Gooden’s backup story. Pramanik’s art and Addison Duke’s soul-searing color really get into Ali’s head as she makes her first kill while Seeley’s dry, clinical dialogue for Cecilia nicely unwraps the moral implications of her action. Vampire Masquerade is definitely a slow burner, but Cecilia and Ali are a great duo to build this story around. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Aggretsuko #6 (Oni Press)– The first volume of Aggretsuko wraps up with a competition-driven story from Black Mage’s Daniel Barnes and DJ Kirkland with the employees at Retsuko’s office competing for 1 day of PTO in various sports. Kirkland’s video game and manga influences come to the forefront especially in a couple climactic events straight out of Slam Dunk or Mario Kart. He does this all while staying on-model and pumping up the energy and emotion. Barnes’ script is creative and full of trash talk, and he throws in some fun moments featuring the fan-favorite relationship between Retsuko and Haida making it integral to the main story. Aggretsuko #6 is an enjoyable supplement to the Netflix anime series and kind of is a vision of the show if it was a 22 episode American-style sitcom instead of a tightly focused 10 episode one. Overall: 8.6 Verdict: Buy

Marauders #12 (Marvel)– After all the shit she’s gone through, Marauders #12 is a pure celebration of Kitty Pryde, her friendships and relationships with various X-Men, her revenge, and also her finally coming out as bisexual via smooching a tattoo artis tafter decades of speculation and subtext. Writer Gerry Duggan takes a beat in his “Kill Shaw” plot to have Kitty enjoy life with Lockheed permanently snuggled up on her neck, and artist Matteo Lolli’s old school art style that reminded me of Paul Smith or Howard Chaykin is perfect for this kind of character-driven story. They deal with the implications of the resurrection process while also showing Kitty’s comfort with certain characters like Magik, Storm, and Nightcrawler and discomfort with being the belle of the ball when all she wants to get is knuckle tats and vengeance. Marauders #12 re-establishes Kitty Pryde as the lead and heart of this series, and I’m rejuvenated and ready to see her take down Sebastian Shaw. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Dryfoot #1 (Mad Cave Studios) – The debut issue is interesting and fun about a bunch of kids who decide to rob a drug dealer in 1980s Miami. It’d be a bit more interesting if 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank hadn’t already tackled a similar idea and done it with a far better debut. Still, a nice diversion from other things out there. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Empyre: Aftermath Avengers #1 (Marvel) – The wedding celebration has a lot of solid moments and drama. But, the comic feels like it could have been a few pages in an expanded final issue. Its really goal is to set up the next major story arc and never quite feels completely satisfying for some reason. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Empyre: Fallout Fantastic Four #1 (Marvel) – The issue is very cute and potentially sets up a lot for the Fantastic Four. Out of the two Empyre follow up issues, this is the one to really pay attention to. It really feels like much more of an ending than the Avengers version. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Marauders #12 (Marvel) – The art isn’t for me and I don’t get the tension at all. You know who killed Kate… so? It’d be one thing if it was a mystery but much like the whole concept of resurrection, the real drama is no longer there. Overall Rating: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Rise of Ultraman (Marvel) – I don’t know the classic property at all so was excited to dive into the series. The first issue is fun and a nice build into the world. It also feels a little generic though. An entertaining comic and one I want to read the second issue but it’s not one I’m super excited about anymore. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Transformers: Galaxies #9 (IDW Publishing) – The series wraps up its latest arc delivering a nice morality tale. The focus is on self-determination and free will, a concept a bit deeper than robots than change into things. As usual the comic is more than meets the eye. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Read

Vampire: The Masquerade #2 (Vault Comics) – The comic series continues to impress though might be a bit more enjoyable for those who really know the world. The exploration of choice when it comes to vampirism is an interesting one and there’s a bit of a Training Day vibe about the issue. This is a series to keep an eye on. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Web of Venom: Wraith #1 (Marvel) – There’s a solid western vibe about the issue. It also dives into Wraith’s history a bit which is nice for those who don’t know the character like myself. Still, it’s really a comic to just warn Eddie Brock that Knull is coming and set up King in Black. A must-read? No. But, an entertaining one. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

X-Factor #3 (Marvel) – The series continues to be a hell of a lot of fun and the return of Shatterstar has so much potential. This is an X comic that’s just full of winks, nods, and laughs and quickly rising to be the best of that corner of the Marvel Universe. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 9/5

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

Strange Adventures #5 (DC Comics) – The series is Tom King’s latest exploring his time in a war zone and like a good mystery and political thriller each chapter is a piece of the puzzle. The issue is another solid entry into the overall dance he’s crafting though it’s hard to measure the overall quality until the full picture is clear. While the issue is good I really want to see where this all goes. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Black Widow #1 (Marvel) – The latest volume for the character meant to capitalize on the film. There’s a few things I look forward to with each volume, solid action and solid espionage. This delivers both in an first issue that feels like the opening of a Bond film just before the credits roll. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Alien: The Original Screenplay #2 (Dark Horse) – I’ve never read the original screenplay for the beloved film so seeing it adapted for comics makes me beyond happy. I love the franchise and it’s always interesting to see how things might have been. So far, it feels like a solid different take on a familiar story with everything that made the original great. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Grendel Kentucky #1 (AWA Studios) – A new take on the classic story of Grendel. It’s an ok start with a lot of good ideas and teases but doesn’t quite have the hook I was hoping for. It’s too many cliches and characters that have potential but you never quite connect with them. This one might be read better as a whole than individual issues. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

We Only Find Them When They’re Dead #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Space Moby Dick? This new series is big on concepts involving dead space gods being mined for materials and the search for one that’s alive. The art is what really pops here with some amazing visuals. The character too stand out giving us a group that has some great interactions and chemistry. A fun and interesting sci-fi debut. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 8/29

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

40 Seconds #1 (comiXology Originals) – An interesting debut about a group of explorers setting off using gate technology sent by aliens. It’s very Stargate in the concept. There’s a lot teased out but the “meat” to make it stand out is never quite delivered. Not a bad start but it needs to show off a little more before it really stands out. So far, it’s a bit too familiar. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Hellions #3 (Marvel) – It’s quickly becoming my favorite of Marvel’s X-relaunch. While the series is getting away from the promise of exploring the concept of justice, it is delivering action and surprising humor with a tone that’s straight horror. Overall Rating: 8.35 Recommendation: Buy

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 (BOOM! Studios) – I don’t know the animated show but very familiar with the original video games and loved the previous comics. This was a surprising debut for me as it’s much more adult than expected. A good mystery and really interesting premise of a debut, it’s a lot more political than expected. Just a solid series start. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Nailbiter Returns #4 (Image Comics) – I’m a sucker for this series which is just over the top slasher horror. While this volume shifts things a bit to feel a bit more “Scream” in tone, there’s something fun and off the wall about it that just makes it fun. We’re starting to get a better idea as to what’s up with all of the Buckaroo Butchers being back but the big picture mystery is still there. Solid characters and great art combine for one of my favorite reads each month. Overall Rating: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #3 (Marvel) – Not quite as good as the previous volume, the series still does a solid job of mixing Indiana Jones and Star Wars. The issue delivers a lot of twists and turns and double-crosses keeping readers on their toes. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

X-Factor #2 (Marvel) – The other X-relaunch that’s fighting for the top spot of my favorite right now. The comic is just a hell of a lot of fun as the team head to the Mojoverse to investigate a murder. The concepts are fantastic and it’s a great update to Mojo’s world. The character interactions are what really stand out as every team member shines and are full of personality. Everyone has their moments and deliver laughs in their own way. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Chu #2 (Image Comics) – I always enjoyed the original Chew series and this prequel has me wanting to go back and re-read it to see how much of that is rose-colored glasses. This new series has lots of humor but also is a bit more sophomoric than what I remember from the previous series. There’s kinetic energy to it all but some jokes are cringeworthy with a bit too much of a focus on bodily functions. Maybe I outgrew the series in between them? This has been an odd first two issues to read. Like an old friend that you don’t quite get along with as you used to after a long time apart. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Logan

Amethyst #5 (DC/Wonder Comics)– Amy Reeder drops the big reveal in Amethyst #5 as Amy and her friends travel to the realm of Diamonds, who are responsible for keeping law and order in Gemworld. And Amy’s parents have definitely been found lacking. Reeder is definitely in flashback city mode in this issue as she and colorist Marissa Louise clearly delineate Amy’s parents’ moral failing and the real reason they’re “frozen” in a crystal and keep it interesting by using actual gems as layouts. Coupled with how Reeder shows how Amy and her friends react to everything, it’s more engaging than it has any business being. The lore of Gemworld is dense in a meant to sell toys 80s cartoon way, but it’s rendered less annoying by the universality of discovering that your parents aren’t angels and have done some fucked up things. Even if said fucked up things involve elemental MacGuffin thingies. To wrap things up, Amy Reeder’s art continues to be the main draw of Amethyst, and this series could have used more room to breathe plotwise instead of cramming all the big reveals into one issue. Overall: 7.5 Verdict: Read

The Question: Deaths of Vic Sage #4 (DC/Black Label)– Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor stick the landing perfectly in The Question #4 even tying together the multiple timelines. The books acts as both a tribute to Dennis O’Neil’s iconic work with the character, who turned him from an avatar of Objectivism to a more nuanced figure, and as ripped from the headlines work of almost-moral-philosophy about the pervasiveness of evil. (The opening comic could just as well take place in 2020 Louisville, Kentucky as fictional Hub City.) Basically, even if Donald Trump loses the election (Or suffers a similar fate as the antagonist of this miniseries.), white supremacism, racism, and oppression will continue to fester. Lemire and Cowan interrogate the futility of black and white thinking whether that’s big electoral politics, or on a genre-specific level, the slugfest that ends the majority of superhero comics. Big double page spreads filled with grids of ass-kicking or splashes of explosions come across as holding actions as Question’s mentor Tot acts as the voice of reason along the way. The Question #4 is a worthy conclusion for a series that had soul-searing visuals from Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor to go with dark night of the soul writing from Jeff Lemire. Overall: 10 Verdict: Buy

Fantastic Four: Antithesis #1 (Marvel)– When Mark Waid isn’t infusing his dialogue with pure boomer energy via his unfunny references to memes and transformation of Reed Richards into stretchy, technobabble spouting Homer Simpson, Fantastic Four: Antithesis #1 is a decent, throwback FF comic. Neal Adams and inker Mark Farmer draw crowd scenes and fight scenes with plenty of power and energy and vivid facial expressions. This book has a high concept hook and arrives at it in a visually memorable way. Waid and Adams are truly in summer blockbuster mode in FF: Antithesis with no fewer than three apocalypses being averted. The stakes are high, but have these two veteran creators blown their wad early? I guess we’ll find out down the road. Overall: 7.0 Verdict: Read

Mega Man: Fully Charged #1 (BOOM!)– I’m not super familiar with the Mega Man franchise beyond the music of the Protomen and Mega Man Battle Network for the Game Boy Advance. However, I quite liked this comic book continuation of a recent Mega Man anime. There’s a beauty, motion, and expressiveness in Stefano Simeone’s art where he makes characters like Dr. Light, Skull Man, and Mega Man, of course, his own and really drives home the father/son story that AJ Marchisello and Marcus Rinehart were trying to tell. Igor Monti’s colors had a bleak, dystopian feel to the comic except when Mega Man is doing his thing during one of the several exciting action sequences. For the most part, Mega Man #1 isn’t really lore-driven and centers around the relationship between Mega Man, Dr. Light, and his sister Suna as well as the human/robot war. It’s worth a look if you like sci-fi dystopia or robot stories. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 8/22

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

Captain Marvel #20 (Marvel) – An Empyre tie-in that really works. Carol resolves her first mission as the new Accuser and we now have her sister as part of the mix. With the introduction of the Carol Corps. and some solid writing and action, the comic is the rare tie-in regular series that doesn’t take away from what had been going on and opens up a lot of options for the future. Overall Rating: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Lords of Empyre: Swordsman #1 (Marvel) – These one-shots have been interesting giving us some motivation and background on the characters. This one obviously is about Swordsman and while generally good the shift to bad guy feels rather quick and not as fleshed out as it could be. It also shows what and interesting environmentalist bent Empyre could be taking, with an interesting message, that it doesn’t do well enough. So, it gives so needed motivation it also shows some of the flaws in the bigger event. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

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