Category Archives: Mini Reviews

Mini Reviews: Kvlts, Barbarians, Savage Avengers, and more!

Barbaric: Axe to Grind #1

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling reviews of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full one for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.

Logan

Trve Kvlt #1 (IDW Publishing) – Scott Bryan Wilson, Liana Kangas, and Gab Contreras explore the fantasy of making some money via robbery to escape your dead end job in Trve Kvlt #1. The story is told from assistant manager Marty’s POV, who has been at Burger Lord for 15 years ever since he wanted to make some extra scratch to buy tapes as a teenager. The restaurant has supportive co-workers, but abusive management and customers so it’s no wonder he’s robs 8 strip mall stores on his lunch break. However, Wilson and Kangas show the foolishness of this plan almost immediately with the heat getting put on him before the first issue even wraps up. Contreras’ color palette is the unsung hero of the issue showing the stress of the crime to using a softer palette for a new, idealist co-worker and finally faded nostalgia for Marty’s youth. Trve Kvlt #1 is a greasy, engaging crime yarn with a side of “Hail Satan”. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Barbaric: Axe to Grind #1 (Vault) – Barbaric is back with vampires, giants, and sea monsters to boot as well as emotional damage. After rescuing his old barbarian buddy Steel from the thrall of giant vampires, Owen, Axe, and Soren begin an epic journey to defeat Gladius, a figure so evil that Owen refuses to talk about him. Michael Moreci’s script is humorous, especially when Axe interacts with different kinds of blood and gets drunk or “hungover”, but there’s a little heart too, especially in Owen and Steel’s interactions. They’ve been through some shit. Barbaric is an ultraviolent, darkly humorous take on the fantasy genre, and sticks the landing on its return issue, especially in its messy Nate Gooden drawn fight sequence. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Brett

Daredevil #2 (Marvel) – There’s some major changes and revelations in this issue that changes a lot of Daredevil’s history and what has driven him. There’s multiple forces that have been manipulating him apparently with a possibility of the divine. There’s a bit of a reminder of the Punisher being an avenging angel but the story just veers towards it and fortunately doesn’t quite cross it. It’s an interesting addition that could add a lot to religious themes of the character. The art is of course amazing. It’s a celebration issue and the backup stories are a fun read. Overall, an intriguing issue that celebrates a big number for the series but doesn’t overdo that aspect. The only knock is an art shift in the main story that feels like a bit of a jolt before it’s clear what’s going on. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Savage Avengers #4 (Marvel) – The heroes are still stuck on the past with Deathlok struggling with its reality. With the revelation this Deathlok is an aged Miles Morales we get the how of it all and witness the heroes final act. It’s a hell of an issue and possible future that should have folks talking about the series. Writer David Pepose is known for remixing concepts and he’s done it with this series and two well established characters and makes it look smooth. And is it the death of Conan the Barbarian!? Is this how he’s written out of Marvel comics!? Add in solid art and this has been a fun series that’s probably not on enough radars. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews: Harley Quinn and The Sandman!

The Sandman

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling reviews we just didn’t get a chance to write a full one for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.

Logan

Harley Quinn S3E4 “A Thief, A Mole, An Orgy”. In yet another hilarious installment of Harley Quinn, writer Tom Hyndman casts his satiric sights on The Court of Owls that has gone from being a legitimate threat to a place of awkward orgies and pinata sacrifices. (There’s a reason the lights stay off.) Harley and Poison Ivy are at the orgy because the sentient, asexual plant Frank has gone missing, and he’s integral to her plan to terraform all of Gotham. But this episode isn’t all Bane with a dildo gags, and Jim Gordon (Christopher Meloni continues to kill it.) failing at campaign fundraising, and it explores the bumpier side of Harley and Ivy’s relationship. Kaley Cuoco finds a softer, less hyper side of Harley Quinn in her voice performance, and Lake Bell shows more of Ivy’s vulnerable side as her avoiding conflict turns into lying. Four episodes in, the writing team of Harley Quinn shows that a committed relationship can be just as interesting as a romantic build-up or break-up. This episode wasn’t as good as last week’s villain award showcase, but there were still some good laughs from Harley Quinn’s take on the Court of Owls and the general existence of Bane plus Hyndman’s nuanced take on Harlivy. Overall: 8.0

Sandman S1E1 “Sleep of the Just”. The Sandman Netflix show kicks off with a very faithful retelling of the first issue of the comics series written by Neil Gaiman. (He co-writes this episode with David Goyer and Allan Heinberg.) Basically, Dream of the Endless (Tom Sturridge) is accidentally captured by a wannabe Aleister Crowley-type named Roderick Burgess (Charles Dance), who wanted his sister Death instead. Roderick’s motivation is sympathetic because he wants his son who died in World War I back from the dead, but ends up being consumed by his desire for power that leads him to abuse his son Alex (Laurie Kynaston) and his mistress Ethel (Joely Richardson). Director Mike Barker does a great job of showing how humans pale in the presence of Dream, who doesn’t speak for most of the episode, except in voiceovers. While looking like he’s made of alabaster, Sturridge exudes utter defeat with glimpses of hope (When his raven almost burns down the Burgess house) and anger. This culminates in an epic, fist pump worthy sequence to show just how powerful the Lord of Dreams is even with his possessions gone and realm in ruin. Along with focusing on the captivity of Dream, “Sleep of the Just” introduces the season’s antagonist, The Corinthian (Boyd Holbrook) showing him as a nightmare that strikes terror in a slow, creeping, yet polite way. Holbrook’s slight Kentucky drawl offsets Tom Sturridge’s more, let’s say, god-like voice. Basically, when Dream speaks, it’s just like the special word balloons Todd Klein made for him in the comic. Overall: 8.7

Mini Reviews: Four Debuts and more G.I. JOE!

Blood Syndicate #1

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling reviews of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full one for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.

Blood Syndicate #1 (DC Comics/Milestone) – The issue is an interesting one as Milestone expands a bit bringing back another classic series with a bit of an update. The update works pretty well but there’s a lot of things that just happen with little explanation making the comic a bit of a headscratcher at times. It’s a decent start that has me wanting to see more but this might be an overall package than individual issue when it comes to how good it is. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Avatar: Adapt or Die #1 (Dark Horse) – Time perfectly for the release of the first trailer for the upcoming sequel film, the comic takes us back to Pandora. The Na’vi are presented with an option to gain knowledge from the Sky People with schools but debate their contaminating their lives. There’s a lot to chew on but like the original film, it feels like it’s not original enough, especially when we get to the end and find the conflict to come in a mysterious disease. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Cold Iron #1 (comiXology Originals) – Me not knowing references probably hurt my enjoyment of the comic but it’s a horror comic that takes place on the Isle of Man. There’s some interesting stuff there but overall it didn’t quite hook me like I hoped. I want to see where it goes but the first issue is kind of meh. Overall Rating: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

Frank Frazetta’s Death Dealer #1 (Opus) – I don’t know much about Death Dealer beyond the classic Frank Frazetta art and the collectibles that spun out of it. So, this being my first introduction to the character and story I was really intrigued. Unfortunately, there’s a lot like it and a lot that’s so much better. This character tortured by a voice who’s a killing machine feels like it’s been done over and over. It didn’t help the comic slipped into some bad fantasy tropes that had me rolling my eyes. Unless you’re a hardcore Frazetta fan, this is a pass. Overall Rating: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero Saturday Morning Adventures #3 (IDW Publishing) – The comic perfectly captures the classic cartoon not just in the story but the art as well. There’s such an amazing attention to detail for both that it feels like I’m transported almost 4 decades back. If you’re a fan of the classic 80s cartoon, this is a must and feels like coming home for some afternoon cartoons. Overall Rating: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews: Go Starward, Deal with Zombies, Survive a Train Crash, and more!

Starward #1

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling reviews of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full one for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.

Task Force Z #7 (DC Comics) – A fun issue that’s a bit of a step back as the next arc begins. The rosin is running out which puts the team in a bind as they need to figure out what to do next. This is a concept which just shouldn’t work as good as it does but each month it delivers a hell of a lot of fun with it’s over the top concept of a zombie Suicide Squad. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Giant-Size X-Men Thunderbird #1 (Marvel) – I wish the comic worked better than it did. John Proudstar has been returned due to mutant resurrection and wants to see what he’s missed over the years so he heads home. It’s a comic that works better if you’re really invested in the character but the main series has done a lot to really get readers invested yet. There’s some solid concepts here that aren’t delved enough into and his history and why he’s important isn’t laid out as well as it should be. Overall, a missed opportunity. Overall Rating: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Starward #1 (Heavy Metal) – Stephanie Cohen’s birthday is today and as soon as she turns a year older, she discovers there’s much more to her life than she knew. An interesting concept of former warriors who protected the world from chaos mixed with fantastic art makes for a hell of a debut. This is a great comic so far and one to keep an eye on. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

The Panic #1 (comiXology Originals) – I really wanted to like this one and I did for the first 3/4 of it. A train derails underground and a group of survivors must figure out what to do… but one person there might not have been on the train. The setup and concept of strangers having to rely on each other to survive is good. But, there’s this mystery individual thrown in there that just feels like it’s out of left field. Maybe it comes together in the second issue but the first is a little bumpy. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews: Knights, Leagues, BRZRKRs, and Blood Stained Teeth

Knights of X #1

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling shorom the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.

Justice League #75 (DC Comics) – Setting up the next event Dark Crisis, the issue doesn’t feel all that exciting or epic. It’s just… off. Not sure why it doesn’t click but there’s something about it. It dives deep into DC history as one and the visuals, while good, don’t quite click like they should. Overall, this might be one to read as part of a trade when the event is over. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Blood Stained Teeth #1 (Image Comics) – A new twist on the vampire genre where this concept of familiars aren’t appreciated. The first issue is a little choppy with the narrative but overall it’s a good concept and start with some solid art. Overall Rating: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

The Last Mountain #1 (Comics Experience Publishing) – In this world fantasy creatures are real and lost a war. Now in camps, a few escape hoping to find freedom. With a lot of backup stories that deliver more depth of the world, it’s a hell of a start with some solid art and an amazing concept. Allegory in entertainment form. Overall Rating: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Punisher #2 (Marvel) – The second issue of the series dives into Frank’s past as we get a better idea of his motives. It feels like a bad retcon of the character’s past that kind of wrecks a lot of the tragedy. Overall, this might be a race as to which is the worst concept for the character but we’ll see where it goes. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Knights of X #1 (Marvel) – A solid mix of fantasy and what we enjoy about Marvel’s mutants. The art is fantastic, action solid, and overall a nice setup. It’s not necessarily anything new so far, but it’s executed really well blending two concepts for an exciting new direction. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

BRZRKR #8 (BOOM! Studios) – The series has veered in a very interesting way. It feels like it’s no longer focused on a man who can’t die and wants to find peace and straight into hardcore sci-fi territory. It’s all an interesting mix but a very interesting departure from the first half to the series. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 4/16/2022

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Brett

X-Men ’92: House of XCII #1 (Marvel) – The continuation of the X-Men animated series mixes things up with the modern Krakoa status quo for a result that doesn’t quite completely jive. The comic has fun with the fact the original material was in the 90s with some of the design and layouts but the rather complicated Krakoa story mixed with the original animated series feels like it’s two concepts that don’t quite come together. There’s no real setup in how it all came together and in the end the issue just generally feels like a condensed HOX/POX with a look from the animated series and a slight twist at the end. It does a good job of using the characters it had access to but overall it doesn’t feel like it captures the original animated series and misses the point of HOX/POX. Overall Rating: 7.0 Recommendation: Pass

The Wrong Earth: Fame & Fortune #1 (AHOY Comics) – Mark Russell dips his toes into the series about the same “hero” on different Earths. In this case, each version wants to build a stadium in their city and have it named after the real life name. Each takes their own path showing off their nature. Russell makes them really the same side of a coin just with one smiling while they screw you over and the other snearing. There’s some funny moments and Russell brings his usual interesting commentary. The art is pretty solid from Michael Montenat and Andy Troy and how the comic lays out bouncing between the two heroes is really interesting. The comic features the usual extras packed in that adds a little value to the overall package. The comic isn’t bad but also doesn’t quite nail down the usual inciteful commentary from Russell. There’s something there, it’s just pretty bleak and jaded. Overall Rating: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Batgirls #5 (DC Comics) – Another fun issue. The art, the story, the color, everything comes together with every issue. There’s such a kinetic energy about every release that puts a smile on my face. It’s always an entertaining read and one I regularly look forward to. If you haven’t read this series, dive into the pop entertainment. Overall Rating: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Joe Hill’s Rain #4 (Image)– Even with the world ending around them, homophobic bigotry is still alive in Joe Hill’s Rain #4. Honeysuckle’s finally reaches her girlfriend’s dad’s house in Denver and isn’t greeted by the prettiest sight. Hill, David Booher, and Zoe Thorogood slow down the pace to show how angry loss has made Honeysuckle as trauma has made her violent and vengeful. Thorogood continues to excel at show the gruesome imagery of people and animals while her close-ups show the aimlessness of Honeysuckle since her reason for traveling for to Denver is over. Although some familiar faces show up towards the end of Rain #4, the series continues to descend into total post-apocalyptic bleakness. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 4/10/2022

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Spider-Punk #1 (Marvel)– From the first Stooges quote to a Misfits-inspired take on a classic Marvel villain, Spider-Punk #1 is a love letter to classic punk and superhero comics from Cody Ziglar, Justin Mason, and Jim Charalampidis. Hobie Brown aka Spider-Punk, a queer Native Captain America, and Ironheart fight the forces of fascism, gentrification, and ultimately capitalism in a fast, frenetic style. Charalampidis’ palette explodes like street murals, and Mason adds a DIY vibe to the classic Marvel archetypes of Spider-Man, Captain America, and Iron Man while having them better reflect our current society. He also creates different fighting styles for the heroes, and the punches, shield swings, and blasts are easy to follow with Ziglar adding quips, song references, and political commentary on top. Like the game Tony Hawk Underground did back in the 2000s, Cody Ziglar and Justin Mason re-purpose classic punk songs and iconography for a new audience that is ready to rage at capitalism through the metaphors of superheroes and 3 minute, 3 chord tracks. Overall: 9.3 Verdict: Buy

One-Star Squadron #5 (DC)- This installment of the D-list superhero/capitalist/gig economy satire series One-Star Squadron is more tragedy than comedy with a little bit of mystery thrown in. Mark Russell, Steve Lieber, and Dave Stewart hone in on the key figures of the series (Red Tornado, Power Girl, Gangbuster, Minuteman) and show that doing the right thing can be a bit grey at times due to things like bills and needing a pill to maintain your sanity/have superpowers for a minute. There are still some humorous moments featuring a silly take on a A-list DC character, but Lieber’s talent with facial expressions is mostly used to show how dejected Red Tornado feels and whether he’s worthy to be a hero again. One-Star Squadron #5 has a real air of desperation to it, and I’m excited to see how the mini wraps up. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

Alex

Spider-Punk #1 (Marvel) I’m pretty far behind in my Spidey reading, but could resist picking this one up. Logan’s given a great little write up already, so suffice it to say that going in knowing very little about the character beyond what I’d seen in the PS4 game’s write up on the costume, I enjoyed the ever-loving hell out of this. Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 4/2/2022

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Immortal X-Men #1 (Marvel)– Kieron Gillen writing Sinister and Hope Summers again is a delight. He and Werneck show just how fragile and ego-driven the Krakoan experiment is and the jokes and the Utopia references are spot-on. Sinister’s ongoing sassy commentary sheds light on the different personalities of Krakoa and matches the chaos of the post-Inferno status quo. Immortal X-Men is soapy, messy, and intrigue-filled and is a true flagship for the line continuing the momentum after Hickman’s departure. Overall: 8.8 Verdict: Buy

Season of the Bruja #1 (Oni Press)– Aaron Duran and Sara Soler’s Season of the Bruja has a cool, compelling premise (A witch descended from the Aztecs is the last line of defense from an underworld god and his demons.), but is structured in an awkward way. It starts in the middle of an action scene with furries (?) that introduces the protagonist Althalia and her associates, but not really as we only really get to know Althalia by the time the issue wraps up. Soler’s art has energy and flashy colors, and the interactions between Althalia and her grandmother (Who is also a bruja) are heartwarming and the real heart of the comic. She and Duran explore themes of imperialism through a visit at a museum with Aztec artifacts and the appearance of a racist priest type that immediately escalates to cops and heart attacks and action. Season of the Bruja has lots of good ingredients, but is bad at transitioning from scenes, creating context, and introducing characters. But its art is damn good. Overall: 6.2 Verdict: Pass

Brett

Amazing Spider-Man #93 (Marvel) – The Beyond Era wraps up setting us up for what should be some solid Spider-Man adventures to come. Ben Reilly has always been a character that felt like there wasn’t a complete idea as to how he should be handled but here’s an interesting direction that feels like it makes sense and a nice organic direction. Overall Rating: 8.0


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 3/26/2022

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Saga #57 (Image)– Saga #57 is light on action, but Brian K Vaughan and Fiona Staples use this installment to have the pain of Marko’s really sink in and also get to know the pirates that Alana, Hazel, and Squire are running with. Plus there’s a full page splash of Ghus, who is still happy and innocent after going through so much trauma. The flashback also shows the extent that Alana has gone to survive in a world without her husband. Along with this, there’s also a B-plot featuring The Will building intrigue and conflict between the Robot Kingdom and Landfall. The war in Saga is pointless, but Vaughan and Staples continue to do an excellent job showing how it impacts the cast of the book. Overall : 7.8 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 3/19/2022

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Batman/Superman: World’s Finest #1 (DC)– Mark Waid, Dan Mora, and Tamra Bonvillain turn in a high energy, high emotion team-up book in World’s Finest #1. Set in the earlier days of Batman and Superman’s crime fighting career, the book has them working as a well-oiled machine until Metallo injects Red Kryptonite into Superman’s heart causing him to transform uncontrollably. Mora and Bonvillain go into almost body horror mode showing the effects of the injection on him, and they and Waid bring in the Doom Patrol to figure out to cure and counter it. But the greatest part about World’s Finest #1 is that Batman and Superman have a genuine friendship as Bruce Wayne and Clark Kent that’s established in a flashback sequence and echoes into the main plot with Batman trying to pry him loose mentally. World’s Finest #1 has an old school vibe with modern visual storytelling techniques, and honestly it’s just nice to see the Doom Patrol in something comics related again. Overall: 8.9 Verdict: Buy

Joe Hill’s Rain #3 (Image)– Joe Hill’s Rain continues to explore the dimensions of grief, loss, and the apocalypse while still having strong thriller elements. David Booher’s narration works well with Zoe Thorogood’s art and Chris O’Halloran’s flat state to get in the head of protagonist Honeysuckle as she, a new friend, and eccentric kid Templeton travel to Denver to tell her girlfriend’s father about his daughter’s death. The introduction of a cop character adds tension and some context about what’s going on in the world outside of Colorado while Thorogood probes at the depth of loss with wide panels of people being skewered by this deadly rain. The bond between the three travelers grows in Rain #3, but even in the face of tragedy and loss of life, some humans continue to be assholes adding another dimension of conflict beyond avoiding the rain. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Nightwing #90 (DC)– Tom Taylor continues to revisit the strong relationships that Dick Grayson has with the various denizens of the DC Universe in Nightwing while weaving into the larger plot of Blockbuster trying to take out Dick Grayson. Geraldo Borges is the artist on this issue, and he and regular colorist Adriano Lucas bring an action movie flair to Nightwing #90 with explosions, flying devris, and finally Wally West running into a hail of bullets. Taylor and Borges remember that Wally and Dick are best friends, and Wally helps save the residents of Dick’s apartment building while offering him a safe place to crash in Keystone City. There are a lot of down beats in Nightwing #90 (the kidnapping of Barbara Gordon, Dick’s apartment building’s destruction), but Tom Taylor finds a lot of humor and warmth in the bond between Wally West and Dick Grayson before springing them into action. Nightwing continues to have its cake and eat it too with strong guest stars that logically make sense in the story, showing Dick’s desire to improve Bludhaven no matter the cost, and exciting art especially in the action scenes. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Eternals: The Heretic #1 (Marvel)– In his last comics work before his passing, Ryan Bodenheim brings genocidal Eternal and patriarch Uranos to life with Kieron Gillen, Edgar Salazar, and Chris O’Halloran. This issue delves into such evil that the Machine takes a break from sassy narrator duties while Uranos and Thanos bond over efficient ways of committing genocide and contempt for their families. Uranos snarks at Thanos for only killing 50% of the universe in a full page spread that shows the sheer force of his power, but they end up being kind of buddies by the end of the one-shot. Bodenheim and Salazar give Uranos a cragginess in his appearance to go with Gillen writing him as utterly believing in his principles. He might be behind bars, but Eternals: The Heretic establishes as a true, very behind the scenes power player in the Marvel Universe. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

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