Category Archives: Reviews

Review: Magic #20

Magic: The Gathering comes to comics courtesy of BOOM! Studios. Magic #20 wraps up the arc as the Planeswalkers attempt to free Ravnica.

Story: Jed MacKay
Art: Ig Guara, Jacques Salomon, Breno Tamura
Color: Arianna Consonni, Breno Tamura
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology/Kindle


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Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #48

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There are also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

The Walking Dead Deluxe #48 is full of shocks and surprises that still hit you with a punch all of these years later.

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW
comiXology/Kindle
Zeus Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Magic #19

Magic: The Gathering comes to comics courtesy of BOOM! Studios. Magic #19 ups the action as the battle really gets going.

Story: Jed MacKay
Art: Ig Guara, Jacques Salomon, Breno Tamura
Color: Arianna Consonni, Breno Tamura, Gloria Martinelli, Fernando Sifuentes
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW
comiXology/Kindle
Zeus Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Fear of a Red Planet #1

There’s been a murder on Mars. Unfortunately for the Sheriff, it’s the most hated person on the planet.

Story: Mark Sable
Art: Andrea Olimpieri
Color: Andrea Olimpieri
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle/comiXology
Zeus Comics


AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The 06 Protocol #2

After the patriarch of the family is killed, a mother finds out he’s part of a super secret government organization.

The second issue kicks up the action giving itself a very 80s action film vibe.

Story: Lee Turner
Art: Cliff Richards
Color: Matt Herms
Letterer: Cardinal Rae

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle/comiXology
Zeus Comics


AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Tater Tales: The Greatest in the World

Rot is a mutant potato who wakes up feeling great, maybe even…the greatest in the world! But that only makes Rot’s brother Snot the grumpiest in the world. The only solution? An epic contest to prove who is the greatest once and for all.

Story: Ben Clanton
Art: Ben Clanton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Bookshop
Amazon
Kindle


Simon & Schuster provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #300

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #300

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #300 is a comic that should be a celebration. It’s the final issue of the long running series being published by IDW Publishing with a future that’s still unknown. It’s also an amazing accomplishment for writer Larry Hama who has been the architect from the early days. The finale to a long running storyline, the issue should be fireworks and excitement to wrap things up. Unfortunately, like the C-130 within the pages, the result is a crash.

G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #300 is an oddity of an issue. Pure action and over the top moments, it encapsulates so much of what makes G.I. Joe fun. The concepts are out there mixing military action and sci-fi weirdness, mixing in a dash of laughs and humor. It’s classic Joe. But, the comic ends on a cliffhanger, an unfinished story that feels both fitting and frustrating. Like a good “to be continued”, the issue leaves you hanging right at a big moment of action waiting for the next episode (issue in this case). But, that may never come leaving it all a bit of a letdown. It’s not so much a celebration as an oddity of a “finale” that doesn’t quite satisy.

Featuring the art of S.L. Gallant with ink by Aria Keane, and color of J. Brown, the art is good. I’m not the biggest fan of Gallant’s style but there’s something for how much is packed into the issue. The action scenes are entertaining and there’s a lot to keep track of and change up. The team handles that well with all of the characters looking solid and each scene hitting its beat visually.

The comic features a PSA from writer Erik Burnham, art by Billy Penn, and color by Luis Antonio Delgado. Like the rest of the comic, it captures the feel of classic G.I. Joe PSAs but like the overall issue, something is slightly off. It’s a nice fun send off but again, doesn’t really feel like that special finale.

And that’s probably what bothers me most about G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #300. It doesn’t feel like a send off. It feels like an unfinished piece by a maestro who deserved a better ending. Still, there’s something interesting and gutsy about leaving things the way it is. This is an issue that’ll be debated for quite a while by Joe fans.

Story: Larry Hama, Erik Burnham Art: S.L. Gallant, Billy Penn
Ink: Aria Keane Color: J. Brown, Luis Antonio Delgado Letterer: Neil Uyetake
Story: 6.5 Art: 6.5 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Pass

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Amazing Spider-Man #14

Amazing Spider-Man #14

It’s been a bit since I’ve read Amazing Spider-Man, but with “Dark Web” approaching, I thought it might be a good time to swing on board. “Dark Web” is the upcoming crossover event between the X-Men and Spider-Man (and a few others) that has them taking on the Goblin Queen and Chasm. Amazing Spider-Man #14 begins to get things rolling in an issue that focuses on Chasm and his motivation behind what’s to come.

Written by Zeb Wells, Amazing Spider-Man #14 is a series of short stories by different teams of artists telling the story of Ben Reilly, aka Chasm. When we last saw him, Ben was vowing revenge against the Beyond Corporation and Peter Parker wanting his memories and life back. In his plot, Ben has found a perfect partner in Madelyne Pryor who is also a clone and having some issues with that. Granted dominion over Limbo she was looking to forgive and forget, but Ben has other plans. The two together making an interesting duo, as both have gone through similar situations a connection I hadn’t really made until this issue. Wells does a good job of giving us motivation and the anger that Chasm feels. But, while the issue does a decent job of catching up readers, there’s still a little bit of backstory missing for those coming into this new. There’s a lot to pack in though and the issue does an admirable job of fitting in so much. You get the basic overview, not the small details, enough to catch up and know what’s going on.

Where I think the issue falls a little short is the use of so many artists to tell the story. While the arc of it all works and makes sense, the art styles themselves vary so much. None of the art is bad at all, it’s good, but the styles are so different it’s jarring. Why this route was taken isn’t clear but it’s something that stands out to me in a negative way. There’s also some styles that work better than others as well, making the difference stand out a bit more.

Amazing Spider-Man #14 is an interesting issue. It feels like something that might normally be a “zero” issue or one-shot leading into an event. “Dark Web” kicking off in a regular issue that doesn’t feature Spider-Man or anyone else other than the villains is interesting in a lot of ways. Overall, it’s a nice issue that delivers motivation but doesn’t quite have that punch that really excites. Still, it’s more than enough to keep me interested in the event to come.

Story: Zeb Wells Art: Michael Dowling, Kyle Hotz, Terry Dodson, Ryan Stegman
Color: Richard Isanove, Dan Brown, Rachel Dodson, Matt Hollingsworth
Ink: Tim Townsend, JP Mayer Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.25 Overall: 7.35 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Zeus ComicscomiXology/Kindle

Review: Kamen Rider Zero-One #1

Kamen Rider Zero-One #1

I know nothing about Kamen Rider. I’ve seen the character but don’t know the story, powers, really anything. So, going into Kamen Rider Zero-One #1, I was hoping I’d find a comic that balances introducing the character and world to new readers while entertaining long time fans. What It felt like was being thrown into the deep end.

Written by Brandon Easton, Kamen Rider Zero-One #1 is an interesting debut in that it feels like you’ve missed a lot of the story. Arturo has inherited a company from his grandfather and with it some sort of supersuit. There’s others that have similar suits too. Then there’s some beam that downloads the suits powers but also disks to do that as well? It’s all there for these who want to parse the issue but as presented, this is a beginning that feels geared towards those that are familiar with the property.

Kamen Rider Zero-One #1 drops us into the story as Arturo is grilled for the damage that his battles have done, which we haven’t seen. But, he’s thrown into a mysterious conflict with a new villain Rangarok. What is Ragnarok? You can read the comic as Arturo’s assistant explains everything in detail, which feels rather odd since a lot of the characters and concept of the comic itself is not. Kamen Rider Zero-One #1 is plagued by over explanation in some aspects and not enough in other. The fact there’s too much at times highlights the need for more when it comes to the basics of the comic. The new villain is interesting enough and the designs stand out but overall, something doesn’t click here.

The art by Hendry Prasetya is nice. The page layouts really stand out bringing the kinetic feel that manga and anime is known for. The characters look solid, especially Rangarok, as they battle it out in a duel like feel. The comic looks good.

But, looks aren’t everything as Kamen Rider Zero-One #1 has a choppy feel overall like you’re constantly missing details. A mysterious person just stands and watches the battle and is given one thing to say, as if we’re supposed to know who they are. The backstory is explained multiple times but done so in a way that feels like a book report. There’s a stiffness to the narrative that could be part of the charm of the original releases but for a new comic, this is one those new to Kamen Rider might want to avoid.

Story: Brandon Easton Art: Hendry Prasetya
Story: 6.5 Art: 8.25 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Pass

Titan Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Once Upon a Time at the End of the World #1

Once Upon a Time at the End of the World #1

Let’s be honest, it feels like there’s a new comic set in an apocalyptical world every week. It’s a genre unto itself at this point. Each attempts to deliver their own spin on the concept or focuses on something to stand out. Once Upon a Time at the End of the World #1 is exactly that as we’re introduced to a world that looks like garbage has overrun everything and what exactly has happened is a mystery.

Written by Jason Aaron, Once Upon a Time at the End of the World #1 is an interesting start. Aaron leaves the world as a mystery with the art telling much of that story. Where it stands out is the characters. Aaron keeps things simple initially launching the series as a “buddy road trip” with two characters who don’t initially get along.

There’s a very cute aspect to what Aaron delivers and it’s enhanced by the fact that the world they’re set in is so trashy and depressing. Maceo and Mezzy, our duo, are exactly what you’d expect in this odd couple. One is very socially awkward having been stuck in a building by themself. The other is a hardened warrior who has spent their time surviving in the wasteland. Aaron keeps things pretty basic and expected when it comes to that. But, where Aaron’s writing stands out is the small details for the two. Each has their own quirks and personality that makes it an entertaining read. But more importantly, there’s some tragedy, especially with Maceo, that creates depth. One panel is all it takes for readers to understand Maceo’s quirky personality and feel sorry for the kid.

That panel is delivered by Alexandre Tefenkgi. With color by Lee Loughridge and lettering by Andworld Design, the debut issue is packed with detail. This is a world that looks “lived in”, really destroyed. Garbage is thrown everywhere. Strange creatures stalk our heroes. The technology looks slapped together. It’s visuals packed with detail that makes it all look real and worn down.

Where the comic dips a little is the end. That features art by Nick Dragotta and colorist Rico Renzi. The duo will take over in later issues. The segment gives us a glimpse of what the future holds, an ominous mix of visuals and dialogue that tells us where things are going. The mystery is revealed a bit too soon and this sort of ending feels a bit overused at this point. Still, the art again provides so much detail you want to see how we got to this point. The scars hint at a hell of a story.

Once Upon a Time at the End of the World #1 is an entertaining start. The characters are cute and quirky and the world is packed with detail. While overall it’s not the most original story, it’s a debut that feels like a fleshed out and thought out world. One, with a lot of thought put into it and that should make for an interesting journey to come.

Story: Jason Aaron Art: Alexandre Tefenkgi, Nick Dragotta
Color: Lee Loughridge, Rico Renzi Letterer: Andworld Design
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: TFAWZeus ComicscomiXology/Kindle

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