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Where the Data Ranks 2018’s Comic Book Films. Aquaman Nabs Over $93 Million in China

Comic film adaptations are big dollars and we track how they do each week to see trends and what’s working and what’s not.

2018 is shaping up to be a record setting year for comic film adaptations. It looks like it’ll top 2017’s record year and then some. Currently, comic adaptations have earned $2.165 billion domestically, $3.609 billion internationally, $5.773 billion worldwide, with a “profit” of $4.758 billion. That’s off of 5 films. 2017, with 16 films, saw domestic earnings of $2.365 billion, international earnings of $3.755 billion, worldwide earnings of $6.120 billion, and “profits” of $4.442 billion. 2018 still has Aquaman opening domestically and expanding internationally, and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse yet to open, as well as the PG-13 recut of Deadpool 2, Once Upon a Deadpool. Those three should easily add another billion to this year’s total.

This past weekend Venom came in at #17 improving one spot from the previous weekend with an estimated $305,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.7 million. Internationally, the film added $7 million over the past week to bring that total to $638.6 million. There’s a chance the film will become the highest grossing “Spider-Man” film before its run is done and make it into the top ten superhero films of all time. The film also shows that budget isn’t everything. It has the best return in multiplier when it comes to budget for a comic film of 2018, so far. With 8.51x it beats Avengers: Infinity War‘s 6.83x and 6.73x for Black Panther.

With a budget of just $100 million, the film is quite profitable and another success for Sony’s Spider-Man franchise which previously earned on average $318.8 million domestically, $488.4 million internationally, and $807.2 million worldwide. The film is likely to be the second worst performing Spider-Man related film domestically for Sony but first currently internationally. The difference is the budget is almost half the other films allowing for a healthy profit. The film is leaning heavily on the international market where it has earned 75.01% of its earnings compared to 62.65% for other Spider-Man films.

Aquaman debuted in China two weeks ahead of the domestic release where it earning an impressive $93.6 million. That’s 85% of the total market share for the weekend in China and is the the studio’s largest opening weekend ever in China and the largest industry opening in the market in December. It expands internationally next weekend with 40+ more overseas market including the UK, Russia, Mexico, and Brazil.

Ant-Man and the Wasp didn’t chart for the weekend but still earned about $42,000 internationally over the past week. It now stands at $216.6 million domestically, $406 million internationally, and $622.6 million worldwide.

The film has not only passed the original domestically (both adjusted and not-adjusted for inflation) but it also has passed it internationally. The film should keeping adding dollars to its total for the next month and is above $100 million over the original. The sequel has a budget of about $32 million more than the original so it’ll need to that to even out profitability.

Avengers: Infinity War gained some dollars. Avengers: Infinity War added about $760,000 to its international earnings.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.165 billion
Total International Gross: $3.609 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.773 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.097 billion
Total “Profit”: $4.652 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $270.6 million
Average International Gross: $401 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $641.5 million
Average Budget: $137.1 million
Average Profit: $504.3 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Ralph Rules for a Third Weekend While Aquaman Rocks China

Ralph Breaks the Internet ruled the weekend again for the third weekend in a row bringing in an estimated $16.1 million that brings its domestic total to $140.9 million. Internationally the film earned $18 million to bring that total to $258.2 million after it debuted in Spain.

In second place was Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch repeating in that spot. It earned an estimated $15.2 million to bring its domestic total to $223.5 million. Overseas the film added $25.9 million to bring its international total to $98.9 million and global earnings to $322.4 million.

Repeating in third was Creed II which added an estimated $10.3 million to its domestic total to bring that to $96.5 million. It also brought in $5.2 million from overseas bringing that total to $23.2 million.

Fourth place was also a repeat with Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald adding an estimated $6.8 million to its domestic total to bring that to $145.2 million. It added $22 million to its international box office to bring its global total to $568.5 million.

Rounding out the top five was another repeat, Bohemian Rhapsody which earned an estimated $6 million to lift its domestic total to $173.6 million. Overseas it earned an estimated $29.2 million to bring that total to $423 million and a worldwide total nearing $600 million.

Aquaman debuted in China two weeks ahead of the domestic release where it earning an impressive $93.6 million. That’s 85% of the total market share for the weekend in China and is the the studio’s largest opening weekend ever in China and the largest industry opening in the market in December. It expands internationally next weekend with 40+ more overseas market including the UK, Russia, Mexico, and Brazil.

This weekend also early screenings of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse and Bumblebee though neither has seen numbers released. This coming week sees Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse open in 3400+ locations, likely taking first place, as well as Once Upon a Deadpool, the PG-13 version of Deadpool 2, which opens in around 500 locations beginning Wednesday.

In othe comic adaptation news…

Venom came in at #17 improving one spot from the previous weekend with an estimated $305,000 to bring its domestic total to $212.7 million.

We’ll be back in an hour for a deeper dive into this year’s comic film adaptations.

Movie Review: Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Image result for into the spider verse

Directors Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, and Rodney Rothman  serve up one of the more unique visual feasts of the holiday film season with Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, which is the first big animated superhero theatrical film since 1993’s Batman: Mask of the Phantasm. More importantly, it is the big screen debut of Miles Morales, the Afro-Latino teenager who succeeded Peter Parker as Spider-Man in Brian Michael Bendis and Sara Pichelli’s (Who is credited as an animator on the film.) 2011 Ultimate Comics Spider-Man series and is still Spider-Man in the mainstream Marvel Universe. The film chronicles Miles’ (voiced by Shameik Moore) origin story as Spider-Man as he teams up with Spider-People from other dimensions, including Peter Parker (Jake Johnson), Spider-Gwen (Hailee Steinfeld), and Spider-Ham (John Mulaney) to fight crime lord the Kingpin (Liev Schreiber), who has gone from threatening just Hell’s Kitchen to all of the multiverse.

Beginning with a flashing Ben-Day dot take on the traditional Sony/Columbia/Marvel opening credit sequences, Into the Spider-Verse‘s animation style and color palette take center stage. The film’s presentation is an intoxicating blend of 3D animation, pop art, some photorealism (Like in the classroom scenes.), traditional animation, and of course, classic comic book storytelling motifs like sound effects and text boxes. The animators make what would be rote sequences in other films, like interdimensional portals or web slinging, imaginative like using stop motion animation to show when another dimension has crossed over into the main one. In a way, Into the Spider-Verse does remind me of  the great stop motion animation work done by Aardman (Wallace and Gromit) or Laika (Coraline), but with a slick big city sheen that matches the glossy sound quality of the music in Miles’ headphones in the first scene of the movie.

However, writers Rothman and Phil Lord (Co-director of The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street) don’t just rest on the laurels of the engrossing animation style, kick-ass action sequences featuring an inventive riff on a classic Spider-Man villain, and scene stealing voice work from Nicolas Cage’s Spider-Man Noir and Mulaney’s Spider-Ham. They take their time establishing a world where the tropes of Spider-Man and superheroes are well-understood and give Miles himself a compelling heroic journey. 

But it’s not all superhero stuff for Miles. Rothman and Lord spend some time in the film exploring his other interests, like street art and music, and his complicated relationship with his school, Brooklyn Visions and family. Miles would rather stay with his friends and community at Brooklyn Middle instead of going to a charter school, and so he sneaks out and fails quizzes on purpose. He feels a bit awkward at Visions, and this connects with his growing pains as Spider-Man.

And every scene he spends with his dad NYPD officer Jefferson Davis (Brian Tyree Henry), mother Rio (Luna Lauren Velez), and uncle Aaron Davis (Mahershala Ali) is to be cherished. Ali and Shameik Moore have an easy chemistry in a pivotal early scene where Uncle Aaron shows Miles the ropes of transforming his emotions into street art. He is a real rock for Miles as he struggles with school, his new powers, and growing up, and Miles is truly at ease around him.

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is a lot of things. A superhero origin story, a coming of age tale with an unlikely mentor figure, a crazy crossover, and a rare case of visual experimentation in a big studio animated film. (Those Rico Renzi pinks when Spider-Gwen first showed up rocked my world.) Persichetti, Ramsey, Rothman, and Lord also use the film to show the universality of Spider-Man, and that anyone of any race or gender could be under the mask as long as they help the helpless, take responsibility for their actions, persevere in the toughest situations, and maybe make a joke or two.

Overall Rating: 9 out of 10

Warner Bros. Has a Plastic Man Movie in the Works

Plastic Man

The Hollywood Reporter has the scoop that Warner Bros. is working on a Plastic Man movie with Amanda Idoko as the screenwriter. Bob Shaye will executive produce.

The character was created by Jack Cole for Quality Comics in 1941 and DC Comics picked him up when the publisher went under.

Plastic Man is Patrick “Eel” O’Brian, a crook who goes good. A chemical liquid splashes him during a botched heist allowing him to shape-shift and stretch his body.

After years out of the spotlight, the character has come back within the past year as a key character in the recent event Dark Knights: Metal and two series. Currently, he’s starring in a comic miniseries written by Gail Simone as well as The Terrifics written by Jeff Lemire.

Brian K. Vaughan Signs a Deal with Legendary Entertainment

Comic book, television, and film writer Brian K. Vaughan has signed a three year overall deal with Legendary Entertainment. This is the first of this sort of deal for Vaughan and plays to Legendary’s finders in television, movies, as well as comics.

Legendary will adapt some of Vaughan’s creator-owned comics as well as exclusive original projects developed by Vaughan.

Vaughan is a celebrated comic creator and created or co-created such series as Saga, Paper Girls, Ex Machina, Barrier, and We Stand on Guard.

Currently, his classic Y: The Last Man is being adapted by FX and Marvel’s Runaways, which he created, will see its second season soon debut on Hulu. Vaughan also was one of the writers for Lost and developed Stephen King’s Under the Dome for CBS.

The Black Panther Scholarship Continues the Wonder

The cast of Black Panther continue to create magic surprising a student with a full-ride scholarship courtesy of The Black Panther Scholarship. That reveal was made during The Hollywood Reporter‘s 2018 Women in Entertainment event. The event took place this past week at Milk Studios in Los Angeles.

Chadwick Boseman, Lupita Nyong’o, and Danai Gurira presented thew new scholarship created by Walt Disney Studios. It was presented to one girl from THR‘s Women in Entertainment Mentorship Program and is worth $250,000 to Loyola Marymount University. The program is in its ninth year and a partnership with Big Brother Big Sisters of Greater Los Angeles.

The recipient, Kalis Coleman, plans on becoming a pediatric dermatologist and attends high school in Inglewood.

During the event more than $1.8 million scholarships were unveiled by Kesha.

The scholarship feels appropriate as the end of the film saw Wakanda opening an institute to educate and share information between them and the world.

Black Panther Earns Three Golden Globe Nominations. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse Gets Animated Nod

The 2019 Golden Globe nominations are out and Black Panther has been nominated three times for best original score by Ludwig Goransson; best original song by Kendrick Lamar, Anthony Tiffith, Mark Spears, Solana Rowe, Al Shuckburgh; and most notably, best motion picture — drama. It will go up against BlacKkKlansman, Bohemian Rhapsody, If Beale Street Could Talk and A Star Is Born in the “best motion picture -drama” category at the awards show.

Deadpool was the first live-action superhero film to be nominated in either of the best motion picture categories with its musical or comedy nomination two years ago. Pixar’s animated The Incredibles was nominated in the best motion picture — musical or comedy in 2004. Neither movie won. Disney and Marvel have been pushing hard for Black Panther with their sights set upon Oscar.

Check out the full list of nominations below:

Best Motion Picture – Drama

BlacKkKlansman
Black Panther
Bohemian Rhapsody
If Beale Street Could Talk
A Star Is Born

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Crazy Rich Asians
The Favourite
Green Book
Mary Poppins Returns
Vice

Best Television Series – Drama

The Americans
Bodyguard
Homecoming
Killing Eve
Pose

Best Television Series – Comedy or Musical

Barry
The Good Place
Kidding
The Kominsky Method
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

The Alienist
The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
Escape at Dannemora
Sharp Objects
A Very Englisch Scandal

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Glenn Close, The Wife
Lady Gaga, A Star Is Born
Nicole Kidman, Destroyer
Melissa McCarthy, Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Rosamund Pike, A Private War

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

Bradley Cooper, A Star Is Born
Willem Dafoe, At Eternity’s Gate
Lucas Hedges, Boy Erased
Rami Malek, Bohemian Rhapsody
John David Washington, BlacKkKlansman

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt, Mary Poppins Returns
Olivia Colman, The Favourite
Elsie Fisher, Eighth Grade
Charlize Theron, Tully
Constance Wu, Crazy Rich Asians

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Christian Bale, Vice
Lin-Manuel Miranda, Mary Poppins Returns
Viggo Mortensen, Green Book
Robert Redford, The Old Man and the Gun
John C. Reilly, Stan & Ollie

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

Caitriona Balfe, Outlander
Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’s Tale
Sandra Oh, Killing Eve
Julia Roberts, Homecoming
Keri Russell, The Americans

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Jason Bateman, Ozark
Stephan James, Homecoming
Billy Porter, Pose
Richard Madden, Bodyguard
Matthew Rhys, The Americans

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Comedy or Musical

Kristen Bell, The Good Place
Candice Bergen, Murphy Brown
Alison Brie, GLOW
Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Debra Messing, Will & Grace

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Comedy or Musical

Sacha Baron Cohen, Who Is America?
Jim Carrey, Kidding
Michael Douglas, The Kominsky Method
Donald Glover, Atlanta
Bill Hader, Barry

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Amy Adams, Sharp Objects
Patricia Arquette, Escape at Dannemora
Connie Britton, Dirty John
Laura Dern, The Tale
Regina King, Seven Seconds

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Antonio Banderas, Genius: Picasso
Daniel Bruhl, The Alienist
Darren Criss, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
Benedict Cumberbatch, Patrick Melrose
Hugh Grant, A Very English Scandal

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

Amy Adams, Vice
Claire Foy, First Man
Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk
Emma Stone, The Favourite
Rachel Weisz, The Favourite

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

Mahershala Ali, Green Book
Timothee Chalamet, Beautiful Boy
Adam Driver, BlacKkKlansman
Richard E. Grant, Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Sam Rockwell, Vice

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Alex Borstein, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Patricia Clarkson, Sharp Objects
Penelope Cruz, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
Thandie Newton, Westworld
Yvonne Strahovski, The Handmaid’s Tale

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Alan Arkin, Kominsky Method
Kieran Culkin, Succession
Edgar Ramirez, The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story
Ben Whishaw, A Very English Scandal
Henry Winkler, Barry

Best Director – Motion Picture

Bradley Cooper, A Star Is Born
Alfonso Cuaron, Roma
Peter Farrelly, Green Book
Spike Lee, BlacKkKlansman
Adam McKay, Vice

Best Animated Feature Film

Incredibles 2
Isle of Dogs
Mirai
Ralph Breaks the Internet
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

Marco Beltrami, A Quiet Place
Alexandre Desplat, Isle of Dogs
Ludwig Göransson, Black Panther
Justin Hurwitz, First Man
Marc Shaiman, Mary Poppins Returns

Best Foreign-Language Film

Capernaum
Girl
Never Look Away
Roma
Shoplifters

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

“All the Stars,” Black Panther
Music by: Kendrick Lamar, Anthony Tiffith, Mark Spears, Solana Rowe, Al Shuckburgh
Lyrics by: Kendrick Lamar, Anthony Tiffith, Mark Spears, Solana Rowe, Al Shuckburgh
“Girl in the Movies,” Dumplin’
Music by: Dolly Parton, Linda Perry
Lyrics by: Dolly Parton, Linda Perry
“Requiem for a Private War,” A Private War
Music by: Annie Lennox
Lyrics by: Annie Lennox
“Revelation,” Boy Erased
Music by: Troye Sivan, Jónsi
Lyrics by: Jon Thor Birgisson, Troye Sivan, Brett McLaughlin
“Shallow,” A Star Is Born
Music by: Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando, Andrew Wyatt
Lyrics by: Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando, Andrew Wyatt

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

Alfonso Cuaron, Roma
Deborah Davis & Tony McNamara, The Favourite
Barry Jenkins, If Beale Street Could Talk
Adam McKay, Vice
Brian Hayes Currie, Peter Farrelly & Nick Vallelonga, Green Book

Preview: Marvel Studios’ Avengers Prelude #1 (of 3)

Marvel Studios’ Avengers Prelude #1

(W) Will Pilgrim (A) Paco Diaz
Rated T+
In Shops: Dec 05, 2018
SRP: $3.99

A COSMIC CALAMITY!
From the dawn of the universe came six INFINITY STONES, each in control of an essential aspect of existence: space, reality, power, soul, mind and time. Now, THANOS strives to collect them all to further his mad plan of wiping out half the universe’s population. Standing between him and his goal: the AVENGERS, the GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, SPIDER-MAN, and more! But with one Infinity Stone already in Thanos’ possession, will even the combined might of the Marvel Universe be enough to stop him?

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