Category Archives: Movies

Graphic Policy Radio Goes to the Movies, and Wakanda, for Black Panther. Listen on Demand.

On demand: iTunes ¦ Sound Cloud ¦ Stitcher ¦ BlogTalkRadio ¦ Listed on podcastdirectory.com

Black Panther is dominating movie theaters with a record setting debut, the best for any movie released in February, and the second best opening for a film that’s a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The movie is receiving praise form critics, comic fans, and average viewers alike, combining action with deep themes that create a thought-provoking adventure.

Graphic Policy Radio is joined by two guests to discuss the film, Clarkisha Kent and returning guest Charles Pulliam Moore.

Clarkisha Kent is a Nigerian-American, bisexual blerd, a snark mage and a culture critic. She has written for The Root, The Establishment, BET, Into, and, based on her superhero persona, her nemeses include Lena Dunham, Frank Grillo, and Taylor Swift. https://twitter.com/IWriteAllDay_

Charles Pulliam Moore is a staff writer at io9 where he covers comics and genre culture with a focus on race, representation and queer identity. https://twitter.com/CharlesPulliam

Movie Review: Game Night

game-might-movie-2018-posterIt’s Horrible Bosses meets David Fincher’s The Game.

Max (Jason Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams) are a mostly happy married couple living in the suburbs whose highlight of their week is a game night with their friends. But when Max’s much more successful and wealthy brother Brooks (Kyle Chandler) comes to visit, awakening Max’s sibling rivalry and competitive streak to the next level, Brooks decides to take over their game night by replacing it with a kidnapping / murder mystery. The twist? Brooks is actually kidnapped, and our group thinks it’s just a game. And. . . hijinks ensue.

What could’ve been another mundane comedy actually has some good laughs, including when it’s using its R-rating to the fullest extent it can. But more than that, it relies on building its characters and a great supporting cast to keep it interesting. Normally this premise might have worn itself thin, but there are a couple of twists and turns that keep it enjoyable. However, it’s never too much and the script never takes itself too seriously or thinks it’s smarter than it is. Overall, it’s what we expect from the people who made Horrible Bosses. 

The real gem of the movie, though, is Jesse Plemons, who plays a creepy cop neighbor who really wants to get invited back to their game night. Plemons is one of the best actors working today, and he is perfect, even if a little over the top at times.

But his performance, like so many elements, actually make sense as things wrap up and you see the entire film for its totality. For instance? There are all these shots of various neighborhoods from above that somehow look like tiny scale models rather than real life. . . is it all part of a (gasp!) game? Make sure you stay through the first part of the credits for some specific payoff.

The other enjoyable part of this film is just how well it’s put together. An earlier comparison to Fincher is not just hyperbole– there is some artistry in the cinematography and directing here. For instance, a scene three-fourths of the way through the film during which a Fabrege egg (really it’s just a mcguffin– go with it) is used in a game of keep away in a gorgeous mansion as baddies chase our protagonists around– up and down staircases, in and out of rooms, swooping up and down giant open rooms with balconies above — all done to look like a single take.

It’s almost as much fun to watch as Plemons enjoy the heck out his character.

The biggest weakness of this film is it happens to be released amongst other films that will overshadow it at the box office. Can I recommend Game Night? Yes. Can I recommend you go see it instead of Black Panther or Annihilation? Well. . .

But if you are like our protagonists and are seeking some fun time with adult friends — and especially if you can go to a theater that will sell you adult beverages to go with it — and you just want to laugh and have a good time without thinking too much? This will scratch that particular itch. Otherwise, this is a definite recommend for watching at home with friends, with adult beverages, and perhaps with board games, especially if the game includes betrayal and murder. I highly recommend pairing this with a good game of Betrayal at House on the Hill or Werewolf.

(Rolls a d6 to determine overall score)
(Adds +2 Jesse Plemons)

3 out of 5 stars

Rob Liefeld Teases Youngblood is Coming to Film or Television… Maybe

Rob Liefeld is on a roll with Deadpool being a box office hit and its sequel coming to theaters this year. The prolific comic creator has a lot of properties with Youngblood being the one he helped launch Image Comics with.

Could that be coming to theaters or television? Looks like there’s some movement according to his Instagram account.

Reality or building hype? We’ll find out!

Graphic Policy Radio Goes to the Movies, and Wakanda, for Black Panther. Listen in LIVE this Wednesday at 10pm ET

Black Panther is dominating movie theaters with a record setting debut, the best for any movie released in February, and the second best opening for a film that’s a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The movie is receiving praise form critics, comic fans, and average viewers alike, combining action with deep themes that create a thought-provoking adventure.

Graphic Policy Radio is joined by two guests to discuss the film, Clarkisha Kent and returning guest Charles Pulliam Moore.

Listen in to the show when it airs LIVE this Wednesday at 10pm ET.

Clarkisha Kent is a Nigerian-American, bisexual blerd, a snark mage and a culture critic. She has written for The Root, The Establishment, BET, Into, and, based on her superhero persona, her nemeses include Lena Dunham, Frank Grillo, and Taylor Swift. https://twitter.com/IWriteAllDay_

Charles Pulliam Moore is a staff writer at io9 where he covers comics and genre culture with a focus on race, representation and queer identity. https://twitter.com/CharlesPulliam

Where the Data Ranks 2017’s (and 2018’s) Comic Book Films. Black Panther Dominates

As shouldn’t be a surprise Black Panther dominated the box office shattering expectations for a record setting weekend. The film has earned an estimated $201.7 million for the three-day weekend (beating our conservative prediction of $175 million). That’s the fight largest three-day domestic opening in history. The film will earn around $235 million over the four-day holiday weekend.

That’s the largest February opening of all-time, the largest President’s Day weekend opening of all-time, and the second largest opening for the Marvel Cinematic Universe behind The Avengers‘ $207.4 million.

Internationally, the film earned an estimated $169 million from 48 markets for a three day debut of $361 million, the fifteenth largest global opening of all-time. It doesn’t debut in China until March 9, Japan on March 1, and Russia, Vietnam, Trinidad, Peru, and Venezuela next weekend.

The film is #50 for lifetime earnings worldwide for a comic adaptation (bumping X-Men: First Class from the spot) and in its debut earned more than the entire run of last year’s The LEGO Batman Movie.

The film received an “A+” CinemaScore and played to a 55% male audience and 61% over the age of 25. Expect the film to have impressive legs and dominate the next month and with a reported $200 million budget, it should be doing fine and make a nice sum of money for Marvel.

We’ll have a deeper analysis of 2018’s releases as more are released (and two come out this March) but lets do the time warp to 2017…


Justice League continues to fight at the box office and stands at $657.4 million worldwide, an increase of $1,000,000 since last week a jump from the previous week’s $300,000. While the film is lagging other DC films, it’s also earning much more at the foreign box office than any other film beside Batman v Superman. The film is earning a little over 65.5% of its dollars from the foreign box office. The DCU on average has earned 58%. The higher percentage is partially due to lower domestic earnings, but the film is definitely not to be counted out at the worldwide box office. It’s now just $400,000 behind Big Hero 6‘s worldwide earnings and currently sits at #25 all time for comic adaptations.

Thor: Ragnarok added an estimated $400,000 worldwide to its total. Worldwide the film has earned $853.4 million. The film is about $10.3 million behind Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and it’s possible it might pass it, though not likely.

My Friend Dahmer continues to gain and now sits at $1,353,812 about a $1,200 increase from the previous week.

Kingsman: The Golden Circle has slowed down but has passed the $400 million mark. It stands at $410.3 million. That’s an increase of $700,000 over the week.

2017 has been a record year for comic adaptations. With over a month to go the films have earned $2.364 billion domestically beating the previous year’s $1.901 billion. Internationally, films have earned $3.752 billion beating the previous record of $3.215 billion set in 2014. Worldwide comic adaptations have earned $6.116 billion beating the 2016 record of $5.026 billion. “Profits” too have seen a record year with $4.438 billion versus 2016’s record of $3.812 billion.

We’ll continue to report on 2017’s statistics until all dollars are in, at least another month, if not more.

Lets compare how the big two comic companies compare for earnings. Black Panther is included, so Marvel’s totals will increase over time. On average DC films earn $317.5 million domestically while Marvel earns $306.8 million. Internationally, Marvel rules with $469 million and DC lags behind with $435.7 million.

Already, the year is an interesting one with five clear successes and a whole lot of mixed otherwise. Thor: RagnarokWonder Woman, Logan, Spider-Man: Homecoming, and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 have done well this year. My Friend DahmerJustice LeagueKingsman: The Golden Circle, The LEGO Batman Movie and Smurfs: The Lost Village, and Atomic Blonde are in that debatable area. ValerianWilson, Ghost in the Shell, and Blade of the Immortal are generally disappointments. Marvel’s Inhumans… got no clue and tough to debate since it’s a television show primarily with a limited film engagement.

Here’s where this year’s comic films stand as far as the actual numbers. With a new film opening the averages have dipped.

Total Domestic Gross: $2.364 billion
Total International Gross: $3.752 billion
Worldwide Gross: $6.114 billion
Total Reported Budgets: $1.667 million
Total “Profit”: $4.438 billion

Average Domestic Gross: $147.8 million
Average International Gross: $268 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $382.1 million
Average Budget: $128.2 million
Average Profit: $254 million

Below is where the films released stand when it comes to being compared to this year’s averages. Those in green are above average while those below are red.

Black Panther Delivers $201.7 million over 3 days, over $235 for 4 days, over $361 million Worldwide

As shouldn’t be a surprise Black Panther dominated the box office shattering expectations for a record setting weekend. The film has earned an estimated $201.7 million for the three-day weekend (beating our conservative prediction of $175 million). That’s the fight largest three-day domestic opening in history. The film will earn around $235 million over the four-day holiday weekend.

That’s the largest February opening of all-time, the largest President’s Day weekend opening of all-time, and the second largest opening for the Marvel Cinematic Universe behind The Avengers‘ $207.4 million.

Internationally, the film earned an estimated $169 million from 48 markets for a three day debut of $361 million, the fifteenth largest global opening of all-time. It doesn’t debut in China until March 9, Japan on March 1, and Russia, Vietnam, Trinidad, Peru, and Venezuela next weekend.

The film received an “A+” CinemaScore and played to a 55% male audience and 61% over the age of 25. Expect the film to have impressive legs and dominate the next month.

In second place was Peter Rabbit which earned an estimated $17.25 million for the three-day and is estimated to earn $22+ million after four days. The domestic total is $48 million after ten days.

In third place was Fifty Shades Freed, last weekend’s winner. The film earned an estimated $16.9 million for three days and around $19 million for four. The film also added $47.7 million internationally for a worldwide total of $268.9 million.

Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle added $7.9 million for the three days and an estimated $10 million for the four days. The film has earned $904 million worldwide and still has yet to open in Japan which happens on April 6.

Rounding off the top five was The 15:17 to Paris which brought in $7.7 million over the three days and an estimated $9 million for the four.

When it comes to other comic adaptations….

Thor: Ragnarok was in #29 earning an estimated $191,000 to bring its domestic total to $314.6 million worldwide.

We’ll be back in an hour for a further dive into 2017’s comic adaptation’s numbers and kick off 2018’s.

Voter Registration Taking Place at Black Panther Screenings

For a long time I’ve questioned why organizations haven’t held voter registration drives at geek events like conventions.

One organization seems to have heard my screams as Electoral Justice Project has launched #WakandaTheVote which is allowing those seeing Black Panther to register to vote.

Founded by Kayla Reed, Jessica Byrd and Rukia Lumumba, the organization’s goal is to register as many voters as they can at theaters.

Reed said:

This weekend we wanted to meet our people in Wakanda. We know that for some it’s a superhero world, but we know that the world we deserve is still waiting to be built — and we want to build it! This upcoming spring and November 2018 midterm elections are an important step in building that new world, and we want to take every opportunity to engage our communities in the conversation of electoral justice. We will be registering people to vote at movie theaters across the country so that we can #wakandathevote at the ballot box.

Over 1,000 individuals responded to the organizations call for help. The organization is focused on educating and motivating Black voters as well as launching an “intensive campaign manager institute” in the spring called Electoral Justice League.

Can’t make a screening and need to register to vote? Text WAKANDA to 91990. You can also register to vote with the handy widget on the right side of our site.

Movie Review: Black Panther

Lets get this out of the way, Marvel films are rather formulaic. We get the origin of the hero in the first third of the film, the second third is the set up where they are beaten down, then the last third turns into a fist fight. This is generally what we can expect and as more films are released, that formula grows a bit old. So, the question is, with each new release, can Marvel Studios deliver enough “new” to keep the audience engaged and interested. Black Panther delivers a lot new and then some, though suffers in that last third due to the formula.

The story is a bit James Bond as Black Panther must bring to justice a man who stole the country’s precious Vibranium decades earlier. Cool gadgets are plenty as illegal deals are attempted to be broken up all as we learn more about these cast of characters.

While we know some of Black Panther and the Dora Milaje (his elite bodyguards/warriors) from Captain America: Civil War where they debuted, the world of Wakanda is mainly unknown and this film is far more than the few that debuted in what seems forever ago. In a sense, this is an origin story like so many other Marvel Studios releases as T’Challa takes up the mantle of King as well as Black Panther. But, where Black Panther stands heads and above what’s come before is how it does that origin story and it’s focus on not just one man.

Played by Chadwick Boseman, T’Challa is conservative in many ways. There’s not as much ego or brashness, instead Boseman plays the character as the leader of a nation but also one who is clearly learning. He doesn’t go it alone or “have to learn,” he seeks council and relies on those around him. This is a very different superhero and the movie does an excellent job of recognizing that. Where it really stands out from those before is the supporting cast which is large and in charge. Lupita Nyong’o as Nakia, Danai Gurira as Okoye, Letitia Wright as Shuri, it’s the women (especially the Dora Milaje) who steal the show. Wonder Woman showed us kick-ass women, this film takes it to the next level in so many ways. And, while they definitely kicked ass, their presences was a statement too. The Dora Milaje are not one size fits all. While all members are athletic, the heights, build, and skin tone differ for each. While I expected a general uniform look (something more like the Amazons in Wonder Woman), I was surprised at the vast differences. In one scene in particular one rather tall member is next to a shorter member and I can only think this was done on purpose to emphasize this. Wright especially stands out for her enthusiasm and Q like character. She delivers the tech that makes Black Panther (and Wakanda) function. As T’Challa’s sister, there’s also a healthy relationship that feels fresh and like it’s been missing from movie screens.

But, it’s not just the young brilliant and kick-ass women who add to the film. Angela Bassett as Ramonda and Forest Whitaker as Zuri add a gravitas in a way and feel like they’re passing the baton to a new generation of Black actors.

But, what is a Marvel film without its villains? Andy Serkis as Ulysses Klaue and Michael B. Jordan as Erik Killmonger step into those roles in what may be the best Marvel villains to date. We’ve seen Serkis’ briefly in a previous Marvel film, but here he’s able to amp up the sleaze to the next level both having fun with it all and making the audience feel dirty. But, it’s Jordan’s Killmonger that delivers a character that’s complicated at at times sympathetic. It’s difficult to truly dissect everything without spoilers but he’s an American whose goal is to take over the throne of Wakanda. His Western Imperialism embodied but one whose past and history makes him sympathetic.

And that complicated nature is what also makes Black Panther stand out as one of Marvel’s best films. This is a film, that in numerous scenes, debates the isolationist policy of Wakanda. It debates how this wealthy African nation leaves other nations and specifically Black individuals to suffer. While it prospers it does not provide aid, instead pretending it too is a Third World Nation. It directly addresses the concept of Black individuals “making it” then leaving others, the debate about supporting one’s own community. While the film takes place in Wakanda, it’s a debate that’s had right here in American communities, about supporting Black owned businesses or creators. It’s that sort of layering and detail that again makes the film stand out and the films’ writers Ryan Coogler (who also directed) and Joe Robert Cole deserve accolades for that.

Coogler’s direction, while good, falls a bit short of my expectations. Coogler is known for Fruitvale Station and Creed (both starring Michael B. Jordan). When it comes to direction, both of those films surpass Black Panther. But, visually, the film is amazing delivering us something that would make Jack Kirby cry. This is Afrofuturism on screen and through all the wonders of the city, when we get to the streets it feels lived in and real. Visually the film is stunning and you do see Coogler’s touches with small looks and moments that create a story that feels natural and how individuals actually interact.

As I said, the film does stumble a bit towards the end with a typical battle that has become standard in Marvel Studio films. This one feels like a bit of escalation with the amount of individuals involved so it does shake things up in some ways. It’s not just the usual hero fighting bad guy. But, the film does stumble in typical Marvel fashion. If it had come out earlier, before the pattern of stories was clear, this wouldn’t have been as much of an issue. But, the pattern and formula is pretty clear now.

Black Panther feels fresh though. The women steal the show. The first 2/3s feels more like a James Bond film than typical superhero movie, and there’s a healthy dose of exploring real world issues. There’s an enthusiasm and enough freshness about the film to make it stand out from the pack as one of Marvel’s best. The fact that everyone on screen doesn’t look like me is a large portion of that. Hopefully the film is as much of a success as I expect it to be and we see much more of this to come.

Overall Rating: 8.75

11 Things to Check Out Before Black Panther

The hype is strong out of the Marvel Cinematic Universe‘s newest addition — and not without reason. While I am prohibited from revealing major plot points or spoilers from Black Pantherwhat I would like to provide is a sort of guide to what you’re getting into. Think of it like a wine and cheese pairing list to prepare your appetite before you go into see this next film.

1. Avengers: Age of Ultron / Captain America: Civil War.

The second one may seem obvious — it was the first time we saw Chadwick Boseman as T’Challa on screen, and it tells us at least a little bit about his home country of Wakanda. But we’re also introduced for the first time to Martin Freeman as Everett Ross, who shows up a lot in Black Panther. 

But many of us will have forgotten (or tried to forget?) that Andy Serkis showed up for about 10 minutes in Age of Ultron as Ullyses Klaue, a South African arms dealer who stole vibranium from Wakanda, which Ultron then took from Klaue, along with a sizeable portion of his arm. This becomes important, so it’s worth revisiting at least that scene from Age of Ultron, and then watching Civil War, because Civil War is just so. dang. good.

It’s also worth noting T’Challa’s character arc in the film, especially as it relates to him being on Team Iron Man. In Black Panther, we’re treated to seeing just how much he respects international law and being subject to the Sokovia Accords. . . which is not at all, as we first see him in the film running an operation outside of Wakanda’s borders to rescue a colleague.

Also, note the final scenes he’s in with Zemo, and with Cap and Bucky in Wakanda. Boseman’s character work and scripting is excellent here, and this carries over into our film here.

Oh, and anyone who felt teased by this scene where a Dora Milaje is about to throw down with Black Widow?

“As entertaining as that would be. . .” Well, we get that entertainment in Black Panther. And the wait is worth it.

2. An Encomium To The Black Experience: Why I Am Excited To See Black Panther

This article by our own Troy Powell is a must-read. This is an incredibly thoughtful take on why Black Panther’s vision of afro-futurism is refreshing and exciting. Just go read it. I’ll wait.

3. Fruitvale Station and Creed

Director Ryan Coogler‘s career so far has been pretty well entangled with that of actor Michael B. Jordan and it’s great to see Jordan stretch his wings as the villain of Black Panther, Eric Killmonger. The MCU has often been faulted for relatively weak on-screen villains, but Killmonger is a rare exception.

To see their first collaboration, go back to Coogler’s first film, Fruitvale Station, which he both wrote and directed. It tells the true story of Oscar Grant who was shot by a San Francisco Transit Officer on New Year’s Day in 2009. It’s a heartbreaking story of hope and tragedy, and a film which I first reviewed as being “the best and most important film of 2013 that everyone who truly needs to see it never will.”

Coogler followed this up with the most unlikely of films– the Rocky franchise reboot/sequel Creed, also starring Jordan as the son of Apollo Creed who seeks out the aging champ Balboa to train him. The single shot of the young Creed’s first fight is such a masterwork of filmmaking it’s worth the price of admission alone.

You add onto that really brilliant character work and an intense understanding of the franchise, and you can understand why Coogler was a great choice to take on the MCU. Coogler grows as a visual director, and it’s great to see his growth from a low budget film to a medium budget studio film to using Disney/Marvel money.

4. That Kendrick Lamar soundtrack

black panther soundtrackAnother common complaint about the MCU is lack of memorable music. And especially where the films have tried to pair up with popular music, results have been. . .  mixed. Yes, I love hearing Foo Fighters play Walk in the bar in Thor (and over the credits), but it doesn’t quite mesh with the film overall. And then you have Soundgarden playing some nonsense over the credits to The Avengers — in my mind, the only problem with that film at all. They should’ve just licensed a good Soundgarden song and called it good. (How much better — and more fitting — would “Rusty Cage” have been there?)

But from the moment we heard a hip hop sample of “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” in the first trailer for Black Panther, we knew we were getting something different.

You can listen to the album streaming on Spotify here and now.

5. A Nation Under Our Feet by Ta-Nehisi Coates

a nation under our feet 1

While this current run on Black Panther may not have a lot to do with the movie from a narrative or character standpoint, it shares something incredibly important which is a social commentary. Coates’ opening run on Black Panther may have been set in Wakanda and been about the politics of Wakanda, but it wasn’t hard to see parallels to our current political situation in the US.

This is completely true of the film as well. It’s also clear that Coogler and Coates are of similar minds about presenting a critique of colonialism (and our current neo-colonialist attitudes towards Africa). Our film also hits hard on the oppression faced by black Americans, a struggle Coates has written on extensively and which finds itself woven into the philosophical discussions of A Nation Under Our Feet.

Beyond that, the basic premise of this run is whether T’Challa and Wakanda have some duty to the larger world or only to their country and their throne. That resonates thematically with T’Challa’s growth in the film. It’s also paced similarly– with lots of dialogue and character and less action.

Please also check out our video review of this on Facebook.

On a side note, a quick shout out to one of my favorite podcasts, Funnybooks and Firewater, which covers comics and offers drinking games and custom cocktails to go with your reading. They covered this a few weeks ago, and if you ever wanted to hear four white guys from Utah and California struggle with their privilege and talk about why they love this book so much, this is worth a listen. Also, they’re currently halfway through Watchmen and inching up on their 100th episode, so check them out.

6. Black Panther by Christopher Priest

h/t to my colleague Jon Carroll, who recommended this to me. Starting in his 1998 run on Black Panther, Christopher Priest introduced the Dora Milaje and the character of Everett Ross, whom we see a lot of in this film.

7. Static Shock

Speaking of Christopher Priest, it’s worth mentioning and recommending Static Shock, which he co-created with Dwayne McDuffie (Rest in Power– we miss you still), Denys Cowan, Derek Dingle, and Michael Davis.

For kids of a certain age who will remember this fondly from the Kids WB lineup of cartoons, this was simply the height of early 00’s superhero awesomeness. It was also important to remember how groundbreaking this was at the time to have a superhero show led by a young black hero. Sure, Storm had been on the X-Men cartoon, but only as a part of a team that also included a fuzzy purple demon.

But this was the impetus for creating the character in the first place– greater representation and diversity in the world of comics and tv. Here’s hoping we also see more of him with the upcoming Young Justice continuation on Netflix as his inclusion was a highlight of Season 2.

8. Blade II 

Yes, for all the hype about this being the first time we’ve had a black comic book superhero in a big budget Hollywood movie, we’ve forgotten that Blade was a Marvel comics character before Wesley Snipes took on the role. However, in my opinion, the first film was good, not great. But Blade II is the far superior film.

Directed by Guillermo del Toro, contender for Best Director this year for The Shape of Water, we get Blade teaming up with a vampire clan to take out the Reapers, new creatures that feed on vampires. This also reunites Del Toro with Ron Perlman from their previous work on Cronos, but perhaps more importantly, set up Del Toro and Perlman to make Hellboy. 

The major difference between the Blade movies and Black Panther? It’s missing a broader social conscience. This is something the Blade franchise always seemed to approach but never quite executed on, using vampires as stand-ins for parasitic and oppressive capitalism and the resulting income inequality. You can read that into the first two Blade movies (we dare not speak about the third one), but it isn’t quite there in the same way Black Panther wears its social commentary on its sleeve.

Some have suggested along with Blade, I should also recommend Spawn, which also starred a black superhero. But then I would be recommending Spawn. And I just can’t bring myself to do that. The Summer of 1997 was very cruel to comic books at the movies. I’m still not sure what is the bigger ignominy– nipples on the batsuit or the entirety of Spawn. 

9. Ultimates II

A Marvel animated film based off the second arc of The Ultimates, or the comics themselves, in which the Ultimate Universe versions of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes (which became a sort of meta-blueprint for a lot of the MCU) enter Wakanda and meet Black Panther.

10. Avengers: Earth’s Mightiest Heroes

Because one good cartoon deserves another, this cartoon series for some reason met an early death after only two seasons despite some amazing work. Klaue shows up fairly early, and T’Challa shows himself the equal or superior of all of our Avengers.

11. Luke Cage and Black Lightning

Last but certainly not least, these are great tv shows, and certainly Luke Cage is set in the same universe. But I didn’t want to just fall into a trap of just listing every superhero adaptation with a black protagonist. What sets these apart is a clear connection with a strong social commentary on what it is to be black in America right now. It should go without saying that if you aren’t watching Black Lightning every week on the CW, you should be. And if you somehow skipped Luke Cage on Netflix, it’s a good time to catch up, especially before the next season of Jessica Jones comes out in a few weeks.

 

Well, there we go. While certainly not an exhaustive list, this should help you as you wait patiently to see this film later this week.

Did I miss anything? Have a favorite Black Panther tie-in? Leave it in the comments section. Wakanda Forever.

« Older Entries