Tag Archives: Comics

SDCC 2020: Oni and Lion Forge’s Comic-Con@Home Panels

Wednesday, July 22

New Kids Comics from Eisner Award Publishers

5:00 – 6:00 PM PST | LINK to Panel

Jerry Craft (Class Act, New Kid) and Faith Erin Hicks (One Year at Ellsmere) join exciting comics artists Robin Ha (Almost American Girl), Derick Brooks (Bright Family), and Jonathan Hill (Odessa) in a discussion about new kids graphic novels. Moderated by Candice Mack (YALSA) and sponsored by the CBC Graphic Novel Committee.

New Kids Comics from Eisner Award Publishers

Saturday, July 25

Inspired: Personal Stories in Graphic Novels

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM PST | LINK to Panel

Whether biography or memoir, the comics medium has proven to be one of the most compelling formats for personal stories of triumph and tragedy, with numerous books having shown up on the most prestigious of bestseller lists. However, personal triumphs don’t only have to find their way to the page through true life stories, and Oni Press hosts a conversation with creators whose work has both represented and been inspired by the lives behind them.
Join Oni Press creators Maia Kobabe (Gender Queer: A Memoir), Joel Christian Gill (Fights: One Boy’s Triumph Over Violence), and Katie Green (Lighter Than My Shadow) for an empowering discussion on therapeutic nature of the creative process. Moderated by Shawna Gore (Oni Press, editor).

Inspired: Personal Stories in Graphic Novels

Sunday, July 26th

Invader ZIM Conquers Everything!
with Oni Lion Forge Publishing Group and ABRAMS Books

2:00 – 3:00 PM PST | LINK to Panel

DOOOOOM! Celebrate Invader Zim with an exciting panel of authors and creators behind the most recent art books and comics from the hit series. Join author Chris McDonnell (The Art of Invader Zim, ABRAMS Books), Eric Trueheart (Invader Zim show and comics, Oni Press), Drew Rausch (Invader Zim #41, Oni Press), and Aaron Alexovich (Invader Zim show and comics, Oni Press) as they discuss the origins of the show, the creativity and originality that made it the cult classic it is today, and never-before-seen art from Invader Zim books and comics coming this summer, including the Invader Zim Quarterlies with Gir’s Big Day! Moderated by Jeff Spry (SYFY Wire).

Invader ZIM Conquers Everything!

Mini Reviews and Recommendations For The Week Ending 6/6

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for. Given the lack of new comics, expect this weekly update to begin featuring comics that we think you’ll enjoy while you can’t get anything new to read – only new to you.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews and Recommendations.


Logan

Aggretsuko #3 (Oni Press) – In Aggretsuko #3, a staff member (Fittingly named Karen.) from the company’s Canada office visits Retsuko’s job in Japan to see why their employees scored so low on a moral survey and to increase “workflow synergy”. Writer/artist Brenda Hickey expertly satirizes corporate speak, sticky notes, and outside consultants who babysit you all day so that you get no work done. However, as the story progresses, Hickey fleshes out the character of Karen and finds out that she and Retsuko have a lot in common, and she takes some of her feedback to not jump down everyone’s throats. This comic is cathartic for anyone who has had a terrible boss that has made them to do tasks unrelated to their job, and Hickey’s art has a great energy that fits into the show’s aesthetic. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Youth #4 (Comixology Originals) – Curt Pires, Alex Diotto, and Dee Cuniffe’s Youth wraps up with a bit of a bang and a bit of a whimper. Even though he’s a Nick Fury expy, Youth #4 shows how much a badass Thunder is as he survives being gutted by one of the posthumans and returns to wreak vengeance. This fits in with Diotto and Cunniffe’s visceral approach to superpowers with abilities having intense bodily effects on both their users and recipients. Probably, the best part of this comic is showing how River and Frank met and a conversation that shows that they really care about each other. There’s a bit of symbolism to one of the character’s names. The bad part of this comic is that the story and final battle feels rushed, and I feel like I don’t know the characters beyond River and Frank. Pires quickly adds powers to wrap up the story/set up the new one and superhero cliches like a secret hideout instead of subverting them. Frank does get some funny lines roasting his friends’ attempts at starting a super-team. It really seems like a story device to extend the run of the comic/upcoming Amazon Prime TV show instead of something organic and naturalistic. Overall: 6.8 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Review: Rogue Planet #1

Rogue Planet #1

Rogue Planet #1 kicks off an intriguing series blending science fiction and horror for a result that’ll leave you muttering “wtf.” The story follows a salvage crew who follow a signal to a “rogue planet,” one that doesn’t orbit a star but instead floats endlessly through space.

Written by Cullen Bunn, the comic feels rather familiar and for those into deep space science fiction, the comic is a bit been there. Bunn, though, delivers small details and that horror aspect that make this debut stand out. That’s part of the strength of the comic. What feels familiar eventually shifts and leaves you scratching your head. What the salvage crew runs across are the things of horror. While there’s hints as to what we’re looking at, and when you think about it, it all comes together, but each on their own is something new.

And that new really works. Bunn is a master of horror and its use in this sci-fi setting feels fresh. What is presented to feels like something new, at least to me. The visuals are unique.

That uniqueness comes through the art of Andy MacDonald with color by Nick Filardi and lettering by Crank!. It’s hard to describe what’s seen without spoiling the comic. There’s just a level of disgust within that you’ll love or hate. It’s not designs for the squeamish. There’s also lots of small details in the sci-fi aspects. The early part of the comic, some of this world is told through small details added. What we see the crew wearing, or have implanted, helps expand what we’re introduced to.

Rogue Planet #1 is a solid blend of sci-fi and horror and while many aspects are familiar, the overall package is a great read for fans of either genre.

Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Andy MacDonald
Color: Nick Filardi Letterer: Crank!
Story: 7.25 Art: 7.25 Overall: 7.25 Recommendation: Read

Oni Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleTFAWZeus Comics

Check Out Today’s New Digital Comics Releases

Rogue Planet #1

It’s Wednesday which means there’s lots of new comics coming to the shelves of comic shops and also lots of comics coming to digital shelves for you to buy! There are over 115 digital comics for you to check out today on comiXology. there’s something for everyone!

Check out below what’s available at your fingertips.

AAM-Markosia

Ablaze

AfterShock

Antarctic Press

Archie Comics

BOOM! Studios

comiXology Submit

Dark Horse Comics

DC Comics

DC Thomson

Drawn & Quarterly

Dynamite Entertainment

Harlequin

IDW Publishing

Image Comics

Kodansha

Marvel

Oni Press

Papercutz

Titan Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week. It’s the second week of new comics after the shutdown and that also means the return of Marvel!

Alienated #3 (BOOM! Studios) – The first two issues of this series has been amazing as three kids discover an alien and all the trouble the spins out from that.

Basquiat (Lawrence King Publishing) – Learn about this amazing artist. – Read our review.

Dead Day #1

Dead Day #1 (AfterShock) – The dead are able to come back for just one night. The idea of this “annual macabre holiday” is really interesting and unique and we want to see where this series goes.

Disaster, Inc. #1 (AfterShock) – A new series from writer Joe Harris and artist Sebastian Piriz takes us on a tour of some of the worst places on earth while digging up trouble. The concept of disaster tourism is a new one for comics and we’re excited to check this one out. – Check out our exclusive preview.

Fun Fun Fun World (Oni Press) – Creator Yehudi Mercado knocks it out of the park with his comics and we expect no less. The Devastorm 5 is an alien warship whose prime directive is to seek out planets to invade and conquer in tribute to the almighty Alien Queen. The only problem is that the crew of the Devastorm 5 is the worst in the fleet. It sounds like a really fun fun fun idea.

King of Nowhere #2 (BOOM! Studios) – Now an honorary citizen of Nowhere, Denis joins one of the locals on a doomed-to-fail money-making scheme at the outskirts of town, while John Doe’s mysterious killer continues to leave bodies in his wake… We’re excited to dive back into this intriguing series.

My Video Game Ate My Homework (DC Comics) – Part of DC’s line of graphic novels for young readers, this is also one of the few that are original properties. Every one of their “kids” graphic novels have been top notch so far and we’d expect nothing less of this one.

Rogue Planet #1 (Oni Press) – A new sci-fi series from writer Cullen Bunn and artist Andy MacDonald about a salvage vessel tracking a planet with no star system to call its own.

Star Wars: Doctor Aphra #1 (Marvel) – Doctor Aphra is the best addition to the Star Wars universe in quite a while. A mix of Indiana Jones and pure chaos we’re always excited for her adventures. – Read the review of this first issue.

Venom #25 (Marvel) – It’s the end of “Venom Island” but an over-sized issue has us expecting something big for this series which has become really tied into Marvel’s bigger picture.

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 3/14

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.

Shean

Star Wars Bounty Hunters #1 (Marvel)– In an in between story of the original trilogy, we find Boba on a protection job. As we find out that his personal history with the two other Bounty Hunters would conflict. As someone else from Bob’s past resurfaces, we find fan favorite Doctor Aphra looking for a high prized Bounty that puts her in a collision course with Boba. By issue’s end, Boba carrying some precious cargo himself decides to diverge his course, in hopes of meeting this person from his past. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Cable #1 (Marvel) Gerry Duggan and Phil Noto give Cable #1 a really fun, swashbuckling tone beginning with single arena combat between Cable and Wolverine. This young Cable really has a lust for life and marvels at his ability to use weapons, telekinesis, telepathy, and also dating Armor and Pixie at the same time. He’s a classic “superbrat” hero, but Duggan and Noto introduce responsibility into his life with a couple, basically teasers for this storyline and maybe even X of Swords. They’re cool, and Noto uses both a thinner and a more painterly style for the pair of teases. However, they feel a little disjointed to the main story like ending a movie with a trailer for the next one. All in all, Cable #1 has an enjoyable tone, fantastic art and colors from Phil Noto, and introduces a couple of big time threats for the old, grumpy time traveler turned douchey (with a heart of gold) whipper snapper. Overall: 8.2 Verdict: Buy

X-Men #8 (Marvel)– X-Men #8 feels like a continuation of Jonathan Hickman’s New Mutants in space arc with art from Mahmud Asrar and guest appearances from the Summers brothers and one of my all time favorite X-supporting characters, the lovable, loquacious Broo. Broo appears in this comic because the mythical Egg King has appeared in Krakoa courtesy of the New Mutants’ space jaunt and has attracted wave after wave of Brood hoard to find it. This leads to the egg getting thrown into space, but not after Asrar ably combines horror and action storytelling in big, damn fight scene as Cyclops and Magik fight off the Brood in Krakoa. Also, there’s a lot of intergalactic politics, but the thread is more difficult to follow compared to New Mutants, and I guess I need to read “War of Kings”. However, it’s nice to see a New Mutants story metastasize into an X-Men story, and Hickman flex those Avengers instead of X-Men muscles. Overall: 7.6 Verdict: Read

Adler #2 (Titan)– Lavie Tidhar’s plot starts to unfold in Adler #2 as Irene Adler and Jane Eyre begin their cat and mouse game against Ayesha (From H. Rider Haggard’s She) and Carmilla. Tidhar and Paul McCaffrey go beyond a drawing room and turn this into a sprawling Victorian crime saga, which is its strength as Ayesha takes over Professor Moriarty’s criminal empire while Adler and Eyre search for his murderer. This comic’s weakness is the MacGuffin of “papers”, which appear at the beginning and the end of the book without any real connective tissue to what’s going on in the middle. There’s no suspense because there’s no reason to care about them other than as an opportunity to trot out cameos from Little Orphan Annie (Captured in McCaffrey’s realist style.) and Madame Curie. Overall: 7.4 Verdict: Read

Aggretsuko #2 (Oni Press)– Jarrett Williams plays on one of the strengths of licensed comics and uses it to explore a character pairing that hasn’t showed up in the Aggretsuko TV show, Retsuko and her vapid deer co-worker, Tsunoda. Tsunoda is still a shallow character, but Williams teases out some of her backstory about how she always wanted to be fashionable, glamorous, and doesn’t mind maxing out credit cards to do so. Sarah Stern uses a pastel palette, including plenty of pinks, to make the flashback scenes pop. All in all, Aggretsuko #2 is a great satire of influencer and consumer culture where philanthropic events aren’t there to help people, but to gain followers and “clout”. Plus it has some high energy death metal growl scenes in the Aggretsuko tradition. Overall: 8.0 Verdict: Buy

Decorum #1 (Image)– The new creator-owned SF comic from Jonathan Hickman and Mike Huddleston has god-tier visuals from a painted, silent prologue basically doing conquistadors in space to a fight scene using a painted diamond as a projectile weapon. Huddleston can go from scratchy inks to full color painted visuals at the drop of the hat while Hickman’s data pages range from the macro (Factions, planets, all-important backstories) to the micro (The makeup of noodle dish the protagonist is consuming). Like most Hickman works, there’s a lot to process in Decorum #1, but he and Huddleston keep things entertaining by having plenty of cool assassins, gangsters, and space shit to go with the granular worldbuilding. Overall: 9.0 Verdict: Buy

SFSX #7 (Image)– SFSX’s first arc comes to a close with Tina Horn and Jen Hickman showing the surviving sex workers at Dirty Mind fighting the patriarchy and not winning any kind of permanent victory, but doing a kind of shot across the bow. Oppression and normalcy might still be the ruling party, but there is still room for kink and queerness out there. Hickman’s art and colors continue to match the high energy of Horn’s thriller plot, but there’s also a sadness to her work too. SFSX #7 is a strong end to the first storyline and leaves you wanting a little more. Overall: 8.3 Verdict: Buy

Hawkeye Freefall #4 (Marvel)– Matthew Rosenberg and Otto Schmidt’s Hawkeye Freefall #4 really has it all: dynamic cartooning (The Hawkeye/Spider-Man hand to hand fight is a highlight), body swap hijinks, vigilante action, and awkward interpersonal dynamics. Clint’s motivation to don the Ronin costume shines clearer in this issue as he knows that the Kingpin runs the city so instead of taking him out or the Hood, he’s going to funnel the Hood’s money into a drug treatment center. He’s trying to get to the heart of the problem instead of punching things. There is quite a lot of punching as Daredevil rustles up a task force featuring such varied characters as D-Man, US Agent, Mockingbird, Falcon, and Winter Soldier, but they mostly end up getting duped by an LMD and a Skrull that Hawkeye found breakdancing awkwardly on the subway. Hawkeye Freefall expertly juggles action, comedy, and social conscience, and is easily one of my favorite Marvel releases of 2020 so far. Overall: 9.2 Verdict: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Oni Press Launches an Online Pop Up Shop Due to Emerald City Comic Con Cancellation

Oni Press has launched an exclusive online pop up shop offering all planned exclusives for Emerald City Comic Con, and books from all creators previously scheduled to sign!

In the announcement, Oni Press publisher James Lucas Jones said:

While the decision not to attend was difficult for many reasons, one of our first considerations was supporting the creators and books we had planned to promote there. We realize many of our creators depend on convention income, and want to do our part to help where we can through sales of their books and merchandise. Additionally, we want to bring as much of the convention experience to fans as possible, despite our lack of a presence on the show floor.

Oni Press unveils multiple exclusive items available now in limited quantities, exclusively through the Oni Press #ECCC2020 Pop Up Store, including the first items in an all-new merchandise partnership with Achewood creator Chris Onstad.

Oni will ship all items at no charge, just as if you picked them up at the con, and is offering 10% off all items featured in this special storefront.

Oni Announces Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters from Chris Samnee, Laura Samnee, Matthew Wilson, and Crank!

Chris Samnee teams with co-writer Laura Samnee and colorist Matthew Wilson for an ongoing middle reader adventure series, Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters in June.

Exploring the drive and boundaries of rebuilding a family after disaster strikes, Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters follows a tag-team of brawn and brains as two sisters, Rainbow and Jonna, strike out into the unknown on a hunt for their missing father, who was taken a year before.

Battling treacherous territory as the planet around them mysteriously dries up, Rainbow and Jonna will have to combat monsters as they struggle to rediscover their trust and sisterly bond after a year of separation, they struggle to find people in this new world they can trust to help them along the way.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters is an ongoing series for ages 8 years and above, available in comic shops everywhere in June.

Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters
Jonna and the Unpossible Monsters

Aggretsuko #1 Sells Out and Goes Back to Print

Oni Press has found success with a day-one sellout of the debut issue of Sanrio’s Aggretsuko!

Aggretsuko #1 reunites Daniel Barnes and D.J. Kirkland, the team behind the widely acclaimed graphic novel, The Black Mage. bringing Kirkland’s colorful anime-influenced style to Aggretsuko, the hit Netflix show in production for season three. Aggretsuko stars Retsuko the Red Panda, a young office worker stuck in a thankless job, whose only stress release is singing heavy metal at the local karaoke joint. With the help of her friends, can she ever find the job satisfaction she craves – – not to mention adventure, the approval of her mother, and even… love?! These comics explore all these issues and more, with each issue brought to life by a revolving team of today’s top talent!

Oni Press is going back to print with a brand-new cover by D.J. Kirkland, available for order now to arrive in stores alongside the second issue on March 11. Orders are due from retailers on both the #1 reprint on Monday February 17.

Aggretsuko #1

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Dark Agnes #1

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Adler #1 (Titan Comics) – Sherlock’s love Irene Adler is on a mission to take down Moriarty!

Backtrack #1 (Oni Press) – A cross history car race allows the winner to erase one mistake from their life.

Conan: Battle for the Serpent Crown #1 (Marvel) – Conan’s in the modern world and heads to Vegas. The story itself is a typical fantasy adventure but the setting and characters makes it stand out.

Dark Agnes #1 (Marvel) – Robert E. Howard’s creation comes to comics and it’s a really fun debut with lots of action and great pacing and dialogue.

Doctor Doom #5 (Marvel) – One of Marvel’s best comics out right now. Each issue has been fantastic as conspiracy reigns.

Going to the Chapel #4 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – The off the rails wedding wraps up and how it ends, we have no idea! A fantastic comic series that we hope to see on the big screen.

The Man Who F’ed Up Time #1 (AfterShock) – A lab worked decides to take advantage of the prototype time machine at work. The title pretty much says how that goes.

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #3 (BOOM! Studios/IDW Publishing) – Just a fun series taking the two properties and bringing them together. If you’re a 90s kid, this is a must.

Star Wars: Darth Vader #1 (Marvel) – While the main Star Wars series shows the events post Empire Strikes Back from the Rebels’ perspective, this companion series shows it from Vader’s.

X-Men/Fantastic Four #1 (Marvel) – The clash between the teams has been foreshadowed for a while but what the ramifications will be is what the real draw here.

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