Category Archives: Random

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Underrated: Eternal Warrior: Sword of the Wild

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Eternal Warrior: Sword of the Wild



eternal warrior sword of the wild.jpgIt should be no secret to you that I am a huge fan of Valiant comics. I’ve also made no secret of my love for the Eternal Warrior. But a lot of that love stems from Book Of Death and Wrath of the Eternal Warrior, and not his first solo series offered since Valiant’s 2012 relaunch, the eponymously titled Eternal Warrior. I first read that series shortly after Book Of Death and didn’t enjoy it as much as I wanted to, and although I’ve heard mixed opinions on it since, I wanted to give the first four issues in the series another chance (you can find them collected as Sword Of The Wild, hence the full title of this week’s column, and what I’ll be referring to them as going forward).

The back of the trade dressing (apparently) reads;

Soldier. Guardian. Warrior. Legend. Across ten millennia and a thousand battlefields, Gilad Anni-Padda has traversed the darkest, most mysterious corners of history. But the horror and bloodshed of constant warfare has finally taken its toll on the man myth calls the Eternal Warrior…and he has abdicated his duties as the Fist and the Steel of Earth for a quiet life of seclusion. But when a blood vendetta from the distant past suddenly reappears in the modern day, he must decide if he will return to the ways of war…for the child who betrayed him thousands of years ago…

Before rereading Sword of the Wild I realised that I had to look at the book as its own entity, removed from the larger continuity of the Valiant universe as a whole. This realisation came because for me Sword of the Wild doesn’t tie in to the portrayal of the Eternal Warrior we were given in Unity, and subsequently Book Of Death and Wrath of the Eternal Warrior (although the latter two came after Sword of the Wild) nor the general continuity Valiant had built at the time. Once I had taken that mentality with the book,  I sat down, opened the front cover and got started… and was immediately transported to what felt like a reimagination of the 90’s era Eternal Warrior.

I say this because although the book doesn’t lot in as well with the Valiant continuity as other books and series have done, it’s still a really enjoyable read. More so than I initially expected. When you look at this book as a standlone story about an immortal warrior finally having enough of the world’s shit and just wants to live the rest of his long days in peace (or at least a portion of them), and remove any preconcieved notions of how it could or should fit into the other stories featuring Gilad Anni-Padda, then you’ll find that there’s a really compelling four issue arc here.

Just on that maybe lines up better with the pre-relaunch Valiant comics than the Valiant Entertainment era.

I really enjoyed this book – far more than I expected to. So why is it today’s subject? Because I hear very few people talk about this volume with the enthusiasm the character deserves because it doesn’t fit the larger Valiant continuity as well as it could. But as a standalone story? It’s pretty good – that’s why the book is Underrated.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Charles Soule Wraps Up His Run on Daredevil with “The Death of Daredevil”

Marvel has been teasing something big for Daredevil with “The End” but now it’s official that writer Charles Soule will be wrapping up his run with a four issue story arc called “The Death of Daredevil.” With artist Phil Noto, Matt Murdock’s darkest chapter yet end in Daredevil #612 and kicks off in Daredevil #609.

In over fifty issues, Soule has added a lot to the character with these moments sticking out to him.

Blindspot
Mayor Fisk
Muse
Matt Murdock arguing before the Supreme Court
Brother Jordan and Ordo Draconum
Bringing Mike Murdock “back to life”

His finale continues the “long tradition of Daredevil writers doing everything they can to screw with the next writer.” Yes, he decided to kill Matt Murdock.

Is this THE END for Daredevil?

Where We Live Raises Over $100,000 for Route91Strong

Image Comics has announced that artist J.H. Williams, will grant the proceeds raised by the Where We Live anthology book published by Image Comics this Friday, September 21 at 12 PM to Lisa Fine Survivor, Co-Founder & President of the non-profit, Route91Strong. The event will be held at Red Rock Resort & Spa11011 W Charleston Blvd, Las Vegas, NV 89135.

J.H. and Wendy Williams along with survivors Lisa Fine and Christina Caria will be joined by special guests and survivors of the Vegas Shooting that occurred a year ago on October 1st.

Where We Live anthology (ISBN: 9781534308220) is available now and can be purchased at your local comic shopAmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-a-MillionIndieBound, and Indigo.

Review: Petals

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the beautiful graphic novel Petals.

Petals is by Gustavo Borges and Cris Peter and published through BOOM! StudiosKaBOOM! imprint.

Get your copy in comic shops today and in book stores September 25th. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Comic creator Tim Yates Pleads Guilty to Child Porn Distribution

Comic artist Timothy Yates has plead guilty to distributing child porn. Yates was arrested in April and officers found “thousands of images and videos of child sexual abuse.”

Yates studied at the Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art and was the creator of Anne Bonnie which was published through Blue Juice Comics. That comic and his bio have been removed from the publisher’s site but his name remains on comics where he is credited as the colorist. The comics are still listed on digital comic services as of this post.

Yates was charged with one count child pornography. On several occasions, undercover officers accessed a peer-to-peer network and came across an IP address sharing images and videos. That IP address was tied to Yates. Yates was arrested on April 4.

Yates faces a minimum of five years in prison and a maximum sentence of 20 years and a $250,000 fine. He’ll be sentenced January 14, 2019.

Aquicorn Cove by Katie O’Neill is Coming This October!

Eisner Award-winning author Katie O’Neill, creator of Princess Princess Ever After and The Tea Dragon Society, has a new all-ages original graphic novel, Aquicorn Cove, to be released by Oni Press on October 17, 2018.

When Lana and her father return to their seaside hometown to help clear the debris of a storm, the last thing she expects is to discover a colony of Aquicorns—magical seahorse-like residents of the coral reef. As she explores the damaged town and the fabled undersea palace, Lana learns that while she cannot always count on adults to be the guardians she needs, she herself is capable of finding the strength to protect both the ocean, and her own happiness.

Aquicorn Cove, a full color hardcover book, is written, illustrated, and colored by Katie O’Neill, with lettering by Crank!.  Oni Press previously donated money to the CORAL fund last month in support of the release of this title.

Join Our Team!

Graphic Policy is always on the hunt for talented contributors. If you’re interested in becoming involved with one of the internet’s most unique, fastest-growing entertainment and pop culture websites, now’s your chance!

Please note that all of the positions offered by Graphic Policy are volunteer positions. Our staff runs this site because we love comics, politics, pop culture, games, movies, television, and geekdom.

We can not guarantee anything but your name in the writing credits (perfect for someone building a portfolio), but we will work with you to help you cover and write about the things you’re interested in.

Graphic Policy will open up its ability to obtain review copies, press passes and more for those who regularly post to the site. Your posts belong to you and you are free to post them here and other sites as well!

All applicants must be over the age of 18 years old and have excellent writing skills.

Please fill out the form below and let us know more about you, and what you’d like to write about and cover.






Underrated: Thundercats (Wildstorm’s 2002 Series)

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Thundercats



thundercats cover.jpgIn another case of “Alex brought something to read just for this column” we have the Thunder Cats miniseries from Wildstorm that I found in the dollar bin at my LCS. Previous iterations of this theme in Underrated have often been a success (aside from Holy Terror which was a terrible comic, but a great column if I do say so myself), but will this one?

Well… kinda. I read the five issues of the miniseries with no context whatsoever which is par for the course when you find something in a dollar bin with no real idea when it was released (2002 is the answer to that). Assuming that you, dear reader, are like me and have some basic familiarity with the 1980’s cartoon, or one of the later iterations.

The thing is with this miniseries is that there is almost no hint given toprevious events, so if you pick this up hoping for a gentle introduction into the world of the Thundercats then you’ll be a touch disappointed. However, the story is still remarkably easy to follow because although Thundercats is a five issue miniseries it feels more like five episodes of a cartoon show with at best a slim plot that leads from the first to last issue. While this may lead some to claim that is leaves the series feeling like a vapid and disjointed mess, I’ll make the case that it invokes a powerful sense of nostalgia that allows children of the 80’s or 90’s the opportunity to easily reconnect with a treasured piece of your childhood.

I would give you a plot summary, but it basically boils down to “the Thundercats are trying to make a new home and are being opposed by villains.” Which is fine. I enjoyed the overly implistic nature of the main plot almost as much as I enjoyed the feeling that each comic was an episode of the show.

Why, then, does this make an appearance in this week’s Underrated? Because I had never heard of the series before, and made an assumption that if you found this in a dollar bin then you’dlikely pass it over as licensed tat. It isn’t tat at all, and was certainly enjoyable enough to spend a half hour or so with for a column that’s supposed to highlight unsung gems, and at best this is a moderately shiny dollar bin gem (unfortunately I had left it too late to read something else for the column so here we are).

Maybe next week I’ll find an actual gem?


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

The PS4’s Swings on to a Spider-Geddon #1 Variant Cover from David Nakayama

REVENGE OF THE SPIDER-VERSE! Marvel is excited to celebrate Spider-Geddon #1 from Christos Gage and Jorge Molina with a new PS4 Spider-Man variant cover, drawn and colored by superstar artist David Nakayama!

Featuring new villains and old villains, shocking deaths and shocking returns, and all the Spider characters you can fit into one larger-than-life tale, this is a Marvel Spider-Event not to be missed! Don’t miss the opportunity to dive into this fresh new adventure October 10th, when Spider-Geddon #1 hits comic shops!

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