Tag Archives: fandom

It’s Superman vs. the KKK in a New Serial Podcast and Upcoming Film

Superman ant-racist

Dillon D Jordan’s PaperChase Films and FANDOM have announced the launch of a serial podcast based on the original broadcasts of the iconic “Superman Radio Show”.

The podcast will be hosted and Executive Produced by Roth Cornet, Head of Development for FANDOM along with Max Dionne, supervising producer and Michael Chiang, senior vice president of programming. Comedian Ed Greer will co-host the podcast.

Superman vs. the KKK recalls the day of radio-drama as an incredible story that mixes undercover journalism, brand activism, and the power of pop culture.

Along with the podcast release, PaperChase is working on the highly anticipated feature film, Superman vs the Ku Klux Klan, produced by Adi Shankar, Dillon D Jordan’s PaperChase Films, and Marc Rosen. Executive producing will be Vikram Salgaocar. Superman vs the Ku Klux Klan is based on the book of the same name by Rick Bowers.

This true-to-life story follows Stetson Kennedy, a man who courageously went undercover to infiltrate the KKK in 1946. In a remarkable alliance, Mr. Kennedy, the Anti-Defamation League and the Producers of the Superman Radio Show, joined forces to expose the cultish insanity of the KKK, severely damaging their influence.

Review: The Wicked + The Divine #40

It’s crazy to think that we’ve almost reached the end of the saga of the ascended, then descended  and part of a millennia cycle of goddesses killing each other fangirl, but it’s true. And Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson are in beautiful form in The Wicked + the Divine #40 that centers around Baal’s final gig at the O2 Arena where he hopes to summon and defeat the Great Darkness with the help of some Dio-esque (RIP) hive mind shenanigans and human sacrifice. It’s a little complicated.

But WicDiv #40’s strength is that Gillen and McKelvie don’t get caught up in plot mechanics and use both the in-story and real world time gap between the rise of the Pantheon and their swan song to brilliant effect. With the exception of some diagram/specs pages, until the literally explosive end of issue climax, McKelvie and Wilson keep the visuals dialed down. The comic is presented like a handheld documentary film or more appropriately a YouTube vlog with close-up’s and awkward angles intermingled with moments of truth and self-awareness. The comic opens with fanboys, Tom and Nathan, doing an “unboxing video” for their Baal gig tickets, and you can almost hear the obnoxious tones of their voices in McKelvie’s loud facial expressions.

But the over-the-top Gen Z parody gets replaced with real emotion as the comic progresses, and you get to know them, especially Tom. He gets more self-aware and successfully reads a situation where his former crush is getting hit on by some strangers and also has a profound understanding on who Persephone/Laura is. Not a destroyer, but a human being. (And so are you.) This empathetic tone flows throughout WicDiv #40 (Except when scheming Minerva has her little long con asides while still playing the child victim.) from Baal struggling to balance the deaths of 20,000 people with the destruction of the entire universe, including his family, and inspiration in general to little fan vignettes of worshipers at Baal’s gig before they “go under”. These scenes return to WicDiv ‘s initial exploration of the relationship between fan and artist/performer although the critic (i.e. Urdr) is not present. The comic begins with the more materialistic side of fandom (expensive tickets, waiting in line) before turning to its inspirational side right before Gillen’s plot hits the big moments.

WicDiv #40 is also yet another opportunity for formal experimentation as Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson lay out the issue in the style of a confessional running the gamut from Shakespearean soliloquy (Baal before his performance) to vlog (The aforementioned Tom and Nathan show.) with reality show and person on the street thrown in for good measure. Even if all the gods, except for Baal and Minerva, are dead or appear on the margins of the story until the very end, McKelvie and Wilson’s visual adaptation of the confessional to the comic book medium allows for quick identification with characters and their emotions plus some honest and soul searching dialogue from Gillen, including a rare look at the interaction between male bisexuality and toxic masculinity. Ultra bi fanboy Tom has conversations about this topic and identity that I had five years ago, and it’s cool to see that reflected in fiction when male bisexual characters are either coded gay or straight except for a bit of innuendo, winking at another man, or a stray line of dialogue. (See most representations of John Constantine.)

Talking heads are usually the kiss of death in comics and are either a chance for the writer to go overboard with their dialogue skills or give an artist on a tight monthly schedule a breather. However, with Jamie McKelvie’s well-documented knack for facial acting and eye for interesting details like the ever shifting, cheap blue blanket that drapes Tom while he waits for the Baal show, they’re never dull. And as the story progresses to the actual Baal gig, Matthew Wilson plays with color strength and situation going from a complex palette when fans talk about their connection to members of the Pantheon to a flat one when the mind control takes hold. The light effect he gives the worshipers is quite “eerie” and spirals the narrative into hopelessness before it takes a turn for the unexpected. And Wilson also gets to play with bold, brash colors thanks to the central role that Baal takes in the narrative.

WicDiv #40 is part jaw dropping arena show and vulnerable singer song writer gig with Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson spending plenty of time developing and exploring the personalities of the fans of the Pantheon, and how the gods have an effect on their lives. With Minerva’s master plan subbing in for the murder mystery, it’s a throwback to the original arc where Gillen, McKelvie, and Wilson slowly revealed the gods’ personalities and action through the POV of ultimate fangirl, Laura. There are murderous Minerva asides and heartfelt Baal self and family confessions, but WicDiv #40 gives a fresh non-insider perspective on the Pantheon before things get all opening sequence of recent Zack Snyder films. (This is not a complaint.)

Story: Kieron Gillen Art: Jamie McKelvie
Colors: Matthew Wilson Letters: Clayton Cowles 

Story: 9.0 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

What is it to be a Fan in the 21st Century? Examining Fandom in Entertainment.

What is it to be a fan in the 21st century? That’s what a lot of people are asking not just of themselves but of their peers and the general culture at large. Right now our society is dominated on all sides by franchises of one stripe or another. Be they books, movies, TV shows, comics, etc…and all of those have thousands of permutations and subgroups within them. Take superheroes which are, for brevity, divided between Marvel and DC Comics which then divides again into the structures based around their universes that then divides all the way down to individual characters. The birth of “modern fandom” is usually given credit to George Lucas’ 1977 opus Star Wars. That was the birth of the block buster and merchandise driven marketing and franchising that has shaped the world in ways we are still comprehending today. The Marvel Cinematic Universe, begun in 2008 with the release of Iron Man, saw Marvel Comics become a global brand the world over in the last decade. Over these decades long franchises, several generations across numerous backgrounds have grown attached to these characters and stories. As a result, fandom has grown to be both a toxic force and a positive one. The question then becomes what do things that we love have to say on the subject of fandom and this push and pull between the toxic gate keeper side and the positive and sincere earnest side?

Stories about fandom are not all created equal. With the rise of social media, the creator and fan dynamic has changed drastically, especially in the world of comics. Fans can interact with the creators of their favorite stories in a way they never could previously. This has obviously led to positive feedback on both the fan side and creative side but it’s also become a doorway for the most toxic fans to vent their frustrations directly to the creative team. As a result, some stories have taken approaches to address or shoot down these fans directly. With targeted social media campaigns and general trouble makers on the web its left creators in a spot where they might not be able to tell the well-intentioned fan who has legitimate concerns about representation from the entitled fan who rages at them for changing the color of a mask or giving a character pants for their costume.

The stories discussed in this piece are meant as none of that. Both are very broad metaphors about actual positive fandom vs. different breeds of toxic fandom to the discussion of creators conflating well-meaning fans with legitimate concerns and toxic bigoted fans who feel entitled is a discussion worth having but it’s also a separate one. This is meant as an examination of two stories with similar metaphorical themes and not meant as a condemnation of people who raise legitimate concerns with creators or a discussion of how said creators respond to the concerns.

With that aside let’s talk about what is often cited as the birth of the modern pop culture fan, Star Wars.

When it exploded onto the scene in 1977 Star Wars left an immediate impact. An impact that was so big it reshaped the Hollywood business model practically overnight and left a permanent imprint on the psyche of generations of young kids. In 2015 after six movies and ten years out of the cinematic spotlight, Star Wars returned with Episode VII: The Force Awakens. Its reception was overwhelmingly positive and had everyone looking forward to more. However, one of its biggest criticisms was that the film was a modern remake of the original film. Despite this, people couldn’t wait to see more of the new characters Rey, Finn, Poe, and Kylo Ren. With the film being an homage to the original the big thematic hook for the new hero and villain is that of two separate stripes of fans.

The first is that of a star struck and super earnest fan. Rey is enamored by the exploits of Luke and the Rebels having a discarded rebel pilot helmet she wears for no other reason than to just wear it, a handmade doll that looks like a rebel pilot, reacting with shock and joy at meeting Han Solo and learning the ship she’s stolen is the Millennium Falcon, as well as referring to him as a smuggler when Finn calls him a general. She is symbolically the audience in this movie in this regard. A super eager fan finally living the dream and super excited about everything happening to her. On the other end of the spectrum though we have Kylo Ren.

While both storylines are incomplete since only one movie has been released with them we can glean enough information about Rey and Kylo to see what they are meant to be symbolically. In this respect Kylo Ren is set up as fan culture gone wrong. Someone who is unhealthily obsessed with the worse parts of what’s come before. He’s seen talking to Darth Vader’s helmet throughout the film and asking for strength to ignore the call to the light. He heads up a planet sized battle station similar to, though much larger, than the Death Star and vows to finish what Vader started. To top it off when things don’t go his way, instead of processing it like an adult, he lashes out with his lightsaber almost like a child throwing a tantrum for not getting his way. Kylo Ren is representative of a toxic side of fan culture that only looks back and has latched onto the unhealthier aspects. Now most people like Darth Vader because of the tragedy that is his story and we even dress up as him but we also keenly aware he is the bad guy and one that should not be emulated, either in ideology or action.

So then how does Marvel fit into this then? Starting in April of 2016 Marvel began publishing a comic titled “The Unbelievable Gwenpool.” Due to the popularity of a variant cover of the Deadpool comic and cosplay of the character, Gwenpool was given an ongoing series with the novel gimmick of her being from our real world. In the comics Gwendolyn “Gwen” Poole is a high school student transported to the Marvel universe via unknown means. Realizing this she dons a costume to avoid being an “extra” and becomes the superhero “Gwenpool,” the star of her own comic book. Gwen herself is a fan of comics and has read a vast collection of them, writes fan fiction, and has a sketchbook that she draws superheroes in. She even is knowledgeable of established tropes and rules of books such as knowing the hero won’t die and that she can’t reveal secret identities publicly because it’s her book and “they” wouldn’t allow that. Gwen, like Rey, is a positive representation of a fan. She reacts with various combinations of excitement, nervousness, awkwardness, and joy at the various superheroes she meets on her adventures. However, she is also her own worst enemy.

Gwen herself is caught in the middle of earnest fan culture and toxic fan culture. While she reacts with enthusiasm and excitement at the prospect of meeting the heroes she’s read so much about she also treats them with casual disregard. Namely, she knows she won’t die because it’s her book and she’s the star and that the people she’s meeting are indeed fictional and thus immune to being killed or hurt in any devastating way for very long. This gives rise to a future version of herself that has become a reality bending supervillain that messes around with the comics simply because she can. This is because Gwen discovers that being from our real world has granted her the ability to not just break the 4th wall but to literally escape between the pages of the books and interact with them as she sees fit.

Her future self had made life difficult in the Marvel Universe in the future because she would reveal secret identities and use her knowledge to essentially toy with the lives of the heroes. At one point she even reveals the secret identity of Miles Morales as Spider-man and results in his family being killed. Future Gwenpool is herself a commentary on the toxic route fan culture can go. Gwen treats the universe with casual disregard because she has power over it now instead of the starry-eyed admiration her younger self once had.

With the characters of Rey, Gwenpool, Kylo Ren, and future Gwenpool what you have is a push and pull of what fandom is and can become.

Future Gwen and Kylo Ren represent the toxic notions of fandom and how these toxic aspects can even dominate and overwhelm the good parts. Kylo Ren is in command of a legion dedicated to tearing down the world the heroes of the original trilogy created and rebuilding it in the image of Darth Vader to the point his only challengers seem to be a small group which are in part run by those old heroes. Future Gwenpool overwhelms the heroes of her time who are powerless to stop her. In the age of social media, toxic fandom can drown out and even overwhelm the positive aspects and these two characters are personifications of that very idea.

Gwenpool of the present and Rey on the other hand represent positive fandom and how those positive aspects can overcome the more toxic aspects. They are the uncorrupted fan. The dreamers that want to explore the universe before them and add their own names to it. Gwen is the pure enthusiasm of fan culture. As she often gets in over her head and on multiple occasions makes people’s lives harder but it is never done out of intentional malice. Rey is the more mature side of that coin having respect for the things around her. This love that is deep and sincere is also the reason that Rey and Gwen can overcome their counterparts in the end.

Both Rey and young Gwen are presented with a moment of temptation from their counterparts. Offers to either make them stronger and give them a life they could never imagine. Kylo offers to be Rey’s teacher and show her the power of the force. Future Gwen show’s her past self all the bad stuff she does with her powers has no real consequences so they should have fun while they can. In these moments, toxic fan culture is literally trying to corrupt earnest and sincere fans by saying the way they behave is the proper and better way to be a fan. In turn Rey’s respect and reverence and young Gwen’s sincere love and passion allow them to win the day. With Rey tapping into the Force herself and overcoming Kylo Ren, symbolically defeating toxic legacy obsessed fan culture. Young Gwen on the other hand is shown how she’s acting and how her earnestness has brought some real harm to people. Young Gwen in this moment literally self-examining her behavior, seeing what it leads too, and outright rejecting it because she deeply loves the world she’s gotten to know and has seen that her future self no longer loves it the way she does. Thus, Future Gwen is literally erased from existence, thereby erasing toxic dismissive fan culture.

With more fans becoming creators and getting to add their own spins and interpretations on beloved universes and characters. As such we must constantly be aware of ourselves and our behavior as fans. Looking at only the past and wanting the darker or more disturbing stuff to return will result in a culture mirrored in Kylo Ren while obsessing over fandom but treating it indifferently and with callous disregard will make us like Gwen’s future self. Rey and Gwenpool show us that fan culture can be a positive even life changing experience for us and that its ok to dream and like what we like. That these aren’t merely distractions or something we should discard. Rey and Gwen show that this can have a real positive impact on our lives. We must be aware and let it in. After all you might be the next one to add to the story.


Ryan Whorton is part of the UTD Graduating class of 2015. He has worked in the service industry for 6 while pursuing education. He writes about video games, comics, and movies in his spare time.

Demo-Graphics: The State of Indie/Small Press Comics

Earlier this week I brought you demographic reports based off of Facebook data for Marvel, and DC. Up next is independent/small press comics! Basically, everyone not the “big two.”

For this report I looked at comic book publisher likes that are not the big two or part of the big two. For this report, Vertigo, Zuda, Icon, are not included though they share similar comics as to other in this report. For this report, terms like IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, Fantagraphics were included. Manga was left out of this as well.

You can check out the stats for 2014 as well as those for 2015, and 2016.

Facebook Population: Over 4,200,000 in the United States

The indie/small press population has dropped about 2.6 million individuals. The previous year gained 2.4 million. With explosive growth for both DC and Marvel it’s interesting to see this drop and especially drop that much.

In 2014 and 2015 Spanish speakers accounted for 12.50%. In 2016 the percentage increased to 16.18%. 2017 sees the percent drop to 14.76%.

Gender and Age

In 2014 men accounted for 57.50% of the population and women 40.63%. A year later, that shifted with men accounting for 59.09% and women 40.91%. 2016 saw women account for 51.47% and men 48.53%.

It looks like women have mainly dropped interest accounting for 40.48% in 2017 while men increased to 59.52%. Men decreased about 800,000 while women decreased 1.8 million.

With men being a majority again things have shifted once again. Women are a majority age 17 and under but it looks like the 20s and 30s is where there’s the greatest loss in women.

Relationship Status

With a smaller populate, every demographic took a dive, though there’s a larger percentage that are “unspecified,” a trend we’ve seen elsewhere. “Single” also saw an increase in percentage.

Education

With such a change in gender breakdowns, there’s absolutely shifts here.

Gender Interest

“Men interested in men” and “men interested in men and women” both remained steady since last year as far as percentage. Women is where things dropped but that’s expected due to the overall population decrease.

Ethnicity

Compared to last year all ethnicities decreased in overall population but precentage is mixed. African Americans and Asian Americans both increased as a percentage while Hispanics dropped. Interestingly, English-dominant Hispanics increased slightly in percentage.

Generation

And not shockingly populations dropped here too. Generation X and Millennials saw a slight increase in percentage while Baby Boomers saw a loss.

Join us tomorrow when we look at comicdom as a whole!

Listen to Fandom Uniting Against Trump on Graphic Policy Radio on Demand

On demand: iTunes ¦ Sound Cloud ¦ Stitcher ¦ Listed on podcastdirectory.com

Since the election of Donald Trump as President many have been wondering what they can do to make their voice heard, get involved to fight what may be coming, and fight against the hate that’s been unleashed. Many in entertainment and fandom have been voicing their displeasure with the election and are working to add not just their voices but also their talent to the mix. Joining this politically focused episode of Graphic Policy Radio is Andrew Slack, co-founder of the Harry Potter Alliance, and Rafael Shimunov, the Creative Director at Working Families Party. Both will talk about some of their plans and give ideas on how you can get involved.

Andrew Slack is the creator and co-founder of the Harry Potter Alliance, Odds In Our Favor, Superman Is An Immigrant, The Rebel Alliance, and now the Hamilton Alliance as he builds a network called imagine Better. He’s the Civic Imagination Fellow at Civic Hall. His work is focused on using the power of stories to unleash the civic imagination through a methodology he calls “cultural acupuncture.” Follow him on Twitter @andrewslack.

Rafael Shimunov is the Creative Director at Working Families Party, a growing progressive party that works inside and outside of the Democratic Party by challenging corporate Democrats with progressive Democrats. Follow him on Twitter @rafaelshimunov.

Fandom Uniting Against Donald Trump, LIVE Tonight on Graphic Policy Radio

GP Radio pic MondaySince the election of Donald Trump as President many have been wondering what they can do to make their voice heard, get involved to fight what may be coming, and fight against the hate that’s been unleashed. Many in entertainment and fandom have been voicing their displeasure with the election and are working to add not just their voices but also their talent to the mix. Joining this politically focused episode of Graphic Policy Radio is Andrew Slack, co-founder of the Harry Potter Alliance, and Rafael Shimunov, the Creative Director at Working Families Party. Both will talk about some of their plans and give ideas on how you can get involved.

The show airs LIVE tonight at 10pm ET.

Andrew Slack is the creator and co-founder of the Harry Potter Alliance, Odds In Our Favor, Superman Is An Immigrant, The Rebel Alliance, and now the Hamilton Alliance as he builds a network called imagine Better. He’s the Civic Imagination Fellow at Civic Hall. His work is focused on using the power of stories to unleash the civic imagination through a methodology he calls “cultural acupuncture.” Follow him on Twitter @andrewslack.

Rafael Shimunov is the Creative Director at Working Families Party, a growing progressive party that works inside and outside of the Democratic Party by challenging corporate Democrats with progressive Democrats. Follow him on Twitter @rafaelshimunov.

We want to hear from you. Tweet us your thoughts @graphicpolicy.

Listen in LIVE tonight at 10pm ET.

eBay data reveals decade’s most popular fandoms

A set of data released by eBay today has revealed a quantifiable list of the fifteen most popular fandoms over the last decade. The data was calculated based on the number of worldwide eBay sales per franchise from the years 2006 to 2015. Also included was a list of 2015’s most popular franchises, based on growth in sales.

The results may (or may not) surprise you.

Biggest Franchises of All Time eBay Data

Star Wars sits comfortably at #1, with a nearly $380m lead over Batman, which holds the #2 position. Transformers rounds out the top three most popular franchises over the last decade, followed by Pokémon and Star Trek sliding into the top five. Superman, Harry Potter, The Legend of Zelda, The Walking Dead, and Lord of the Rings make it into the top ten franchises, and Naruto, Game of Thrones, Doctor Who, X-Men, and South Park finish out the list.

In terms of sales velocity,

  • One Star Wars item is sold every 14 seconds
  • One Pokémon item is sold every 28 seconds
  • One Batman item is sold every 37 seconds
  • One Transformers item is sold every 60 seconds
  • One Superman item is sold every 72 seconds
  • One Harry Potter item is sold every 75 seconds

Since the launch of Pokémon Go, the franchise’s average sales over the last decade have increased by 57 percent. One Pokémon-related item is now sold every 12 seconds.

Highest Growth Franchises in Last Year eBay Data

This year’s most popular franchises are Mr. Robot, with a growth that’s up 414 percent from last year. Preacher is up 288 percent and Suicide Squad follows with 160 percent growth. Deadpool gained another 155 percent in terms of fan growth, and Game of Thrones nearly doubled its buying on eBay. The rest of the top ten includes Captain America, Superman, X-Men, Transformers, and Batman, and Star Wars, Pokémon, Star Trek, Dr. Strange, and Harry Potter all fall in the top fifteen.

Demo-Graphics: The State of Indie/Small Press Comics

Earlier this week I brought you demographic reports based off of Facebook data for Marvel, and DC. Up next is independent/small press comics! Basically, everyone not the “big two.”

For this report I looked at comic book publisher likes that are not the big two or part of the big two. For this report, Vertigo, Zuda, Icon, are not included though they share similar comics as to other in this report. For this report, terms like IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, Fantagraphics were included. Manga was left out of this as well.

You can check out the stats for 2014 as well as those for 2015.

Facebook Population: Over 6,800,000 in the United States

The indie/small press population has grown since last year by about 2.4 million individuals. That’s double the amount as last year and the year before which each grew 1.2 million.

In 2014 and 2015 Spanish speakers accounted for 12.50%. In 2016 the percentage increased to 16.18%.

Gender and Age

In 2014 men accounted for 57.50% of the population and women 40.63%. A year later, that shifted with men accounting for 59.09% and women 40.91%. The past year has brought some impressive changes as women now are a majority with 51.47% and men account for 48.53%.

indie facebook gender 7.19.16This is how gender changes as far as percent over age. With women being a majority things are clearly different, but interestingly men overtake the majority around age 22 and lose it at about 33.

indie facebook gender age 7.19.16And the raw data.

indie facebook gender age raw 7.19.16Relationship Status

Compared to last year those engaged took a serious drop, decreasing about 12 percentage points. Those Married double in percentage and over tripled in raw number. Those that are Single dipped slightly too, dropping about 4 percentage points.

indie facebook relationship status 7.19.16Education

With such a change in gender breakdowns, there’s absolutely shifts here.

indie facebook education 7.19.16Gender Interest

With less Men, those all saw dips as far as how much they make up in percentage. Women interested in Women almost doubled while Women interested in both Men and Women increased about 0.7 percentage points.

indie facebook gender interest 7.19.16Ethnicity

Compared to last year all ethnicities increased a few percentage points.

indie facebook ethnicity 7.19.16Generation

The gains here all all in Generation X and Millennials, but what’s striking is again Generation X is majority women while Millennials are now about 50/50 parity.

indie facebook generation 7.19.16Join us tomorrow when we look at comicdom as a whole!

Demo-Graphics: The State of Indie/Small Press Comics

Earlier this week I brought you demographic reports based off of Facebook data for Marvel, and DC. Up next is independent/small press comics! Basically, everyone not the “big two.”

For this report I looked at comic book publisher likes that are not the big two or part of the big two. For this report, Vertigo, Zuda, Icon, are not included though they share similar comics as to other in this report. For this report, terms like IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, Fantagraphics were included. Manga was left out of this as well. In 2014 49 terms were used to generate these stats. In 2015 that number has remained the same.

Facebook Population: Over 4,400,000 in the United States

The indie/small press population has grown since last year by about 1.2 million individuals. That’s the same amount it grew in the previous year.

In 2014 Spanish speakers accounted for 12.50%. In 2015, that percentage dipped a bit, and is also 12.5%.

Gender and Age

In 2014 men accounted for 57.50% of the population and women 40.63%. A year later, that has shifted a bit with men now accounting for 59.09% and women 40.91%.

Here’s the stats for gender.

Indie Facebook 7.8.15

This is how gender changes as far as percent over age.

Indie Facebook age gender 7.8.15

And the raw data. Unlike Marvel and DC, Indie/Small press has lost young women as far as percentage of the population.

Indie Facebook age gender raw 7.8.15

Relationship Status

A lot more people are engaged, compared to last year. Congrats everyone!

Indie Facebook relationship 7.8.15

And for those that like pie charts.

Indie facebook relationship pie chart 7.8.15

Education

There’s so slight shifts since last year.

Indie Facebook education 7.8.15

Gender Interest

These stats are similar to last year, unlike Marvel and DC which saw the percentage of those interested in the same sex decrease.

Indie Facebook gender interest 7.8.15

Ethnicity

For the first time we have these stats, so they’re presented here without comment.

Indie Facebook ethnicity 7.8.15

Generation

For the first time we have these stats, so they’re presented here without comment.

Indie Facebook generation 7.8.15

Join us tomorrow when we look at comicdom as a whole!

Demo-Graphics: The State of Indie/Small Press Comics

Earlier today we brought you demographic reports based off of Facebook data for Marvel, and DC. Up next is independent/small press comics! Basically, everyone not the “big two.”

For this report I looked at comic book publisher likes that are not the big two or part of the big two. For this report, Vertigo, Zuda, Icon, are not included though they share similar comics as to other in this report. For this report, terms like IDW Publishing, BOOM! Studios, Fantagraphics were included. Manga was left out of this as well.

In 2013 62 terms were used to generate these stats. In 2014 that number has shrunk to 49. However Facebook updated their system in late 2013, returning more data than ever before. Both reports just focused on individuals in the United States.

Facebook Population: Over 3,200,000 in the United States

The indie/small press population has grown since last year by about 1.2 million individuals.

In 2013 Spanish speakers accounted for 13.00%. In 2014, that percentage dipped a bit, and is now 12.5%.

Gender and Age

In 2013 men accounted for 54% of the population and women 46%. A year later, that has shifted a bit with men now accounting for 57.50% and women 40.63%. In the growth since last year, it was almost 2:1 men.

Here’s the changes of the stats since last year.

indie changeHere’s the stats for gender.

indie gender 7.24.14This is how gender changes as far as percent over age.

indie gender age 7.24.14And the raw data.

indie gender age raw 7.24.14Relationship Status

Since 2013, Facebook updated this statistic so there’s more choices than ever, so it’s a bit difficult to compare this year to last year. Here’s the statistics as they stand for 2014.

indie relationship status 7.24.14And for those that like pie charts.

indie relationship status pie chart 7.24.14Education

This statistic too has changed since 2013. Here’s the expanded data as it stands this year.

indie education 7.24.14Gender Interest

This statistic too has changed since last year, with more options. Compared to 2013 though, men interested in men is roughly the same when you include the “men and women” option. Women interested in women though has dipped.

indie gender interest 7.24.14Join us at 6pm when we look at comic-dom as a whole!

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