About these ads

Who Are the Comic Book Fans on Facebook?


Bookmark and Share

During yesterday’s weekly #comicmarket chat a discussion about data and the cost to reaching new customers arose.  That got me wondering, who are self-identified comic book fans?  One of the easiest ways to find this is through Facebook, who along with Google is one of the kings of consumer data.  Below is what I found diving in.

The Methodology

I’m not going to give away the complete method to the madness but I looked at various ways folks could identify they enjoy comic books on Facebook (this was done through Likes).  I found nine likes that comprised this universe.  Beyond the nine, the overall universe didn’t expand too much.

Keep in mind, this is self identification, I’m sure there are numerous other fans of the medium who have not marked themselves as much.  The second major thing is, the data below is for those living in the United States.  Moving it beyond this one country created a data set too large to handle through the way this was gathered.

I played with some ways to get a large base to work from and found 9 key identifiers.  Going above this nine added to the universe, but not to the point that it mattered much.  In my eyes, this nine were some of the top identifiers covering fans of mainstream comics and indie comics.  I then took this universe and broke it down numerous ways.  Here’s what I found.

Total United States Comic Book Fan Facebook Population = over 1,215,960 – this is the total number of people who identified themselves through these nine items.

Men vs. WomenComic Books Men and Women

The first look was to see how this population broke down through gender.  The second part was to look at their education.  Keep in mind that totals might not equal the complete universe as not everyone identifies themselves in every category.

College Grad In College In High School
Total 1,215,960 336,260 141,680 79,020
Men 905,100 249,260 94,800 57,580
Women 304,700 84,780 46,000 21,200

27.65% of the individuals marked themselves as College Graduates.  With 27.54% of men having a degree and 27.82% of women.  As a whole according to this data, the women outperformed the men when it came to education.

Age

When you see the age Comic Books by Agebreakdown things get interesting with the majority of the population falling into the 18 to 30 year old range.  31 to 45 year olds out-numbering the 17 and under crowd.  It seems there’s tons of potential growth in that 17 and under crowd but also would worry me as generations age and fans die off.  Get them while they’re young.

Men Women
17 and under 168,280 118,920 49,020
18-30 771,340 558,340 208,900
31-45 233,240 195,200 36,720
46+ 43,080 32,600 10,060

Relationship Status

Are comic fans really the stereotypical lonely nerd living in their parents basement?  By a slim majority out of a total population of 966,620Comic Book Relationship status individuals, 50.27% are either engaged, in a relationship or married.  A whopping 49.72% mark themselves as single.  I’ll bring future analysis of how this breaks down by age and gender.

Single 480,600 49.72%
Engaged 42,740 4.42%
In Relationship 256,580 26.54%
Married 186,700 19.31%

But who are they interested in?  I dove in deeper to see how individuals identified themselves as to which gender they’re interested in.

Men Women
Men 14,940 616,640
Women 152,320 27,940

811,840 individuals identified what gender they’re interested in.  5.28% marked same gender preference.  We’ll break this down in the future based on age and relationship status.

That’s it for now.  I’ll be making this sort of information a regular feature and we’ll see how things like this summer’s numerous comic book movies and events like Free Comic Book Day moves these numbers.  But, I throw this to you, what would you like to see?  More regional information?  This expanded to international figures?

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Marketing, Random

Author:Brett Schenker

Brett is a political consultant who resides in Arlington, VA. He grew up in Cleveland, OH and Buffalo, NY and attended the University at Buffalo, majoring in Political Science. Since then Brett has made his mark on politics working in various positions such as a Legislative Staffer for the Erie County Legislature, Special Assistant for Senator John Kerry, as the Database Administrator for Forward Together PAC, Deputy Internet Director for Chris Dodd for President, and Internet/Database Director for Virginians for Brian Moran, and Email Deliverability Czar for Salsa Labs. In 2007 Brett formed 5B Consulting providing his expertise on database solutions, new media and email strategy. He's a long time geek, reading comics since he was a child and learning to spell his name on an Atari 800. When he's not working, he's reading comics, playing video games and relaxing with a nice cup of tea. You can follow him on Twitter @bhschenker

Subscribe

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

29 Comments on “Who Are the Comic Book Fans on Facebook?”

  1. April 27, 2011 at 12:33 pm #

    I wonder if you managed to pick me up in that poll.

    I’m horrible at math thingers (unless it has a network card and speaks ethernet packets I’m useless) so I wonder what percentile I fall into.

    I’m:
    Male
    35
    Married

    Great stuff by the way, linking to ya.

  2. May 2, 2011 at 7:07 am #

    According to those figures, less than 2.4% of the males are gay, but over 15% of the women are lesbian. And there are nearly twice as many lesbians as there are gay men in this population.

    This is counterintuitive, to say the least. Estimates of how much of the general population is gay/lesbian vary of course, but the estimates usually show a lower percentage for women than for men.

    • May 2, 2011 at 10:38 am #

      No idea on the why, keep in mind this is public self-identification. I’m sure stigma has something to do with it.

    • May 13, 2011 at 1:07 am #

      That is about the same figure I reported when I looked reviewed a research article on gender and gaming. The researchers looked at Everquest 2 players and found about a 14% female bisexual player base which is about 5 times the national average. They could not figure out why and really had no guesses. By the way, a fantastic article.

      http://geekeryonline.com/gamergeek/gender-roles-in-mmos/

      • May 13, 2011 at 10:11 am #

        Interesting. I unfortunately don’t know the why, maybe escapist fantasies appeal to that demographic? The thing though is the numbers are definitely skewed for this for the following reasons:
        1) People could be looking for activity partners, or friends, or to network, so might list a gender they’re not necessarily attracted to.
        2) This is public, so I’d imagine that number is under reported possibly
        3) There’s a strange phenomenon (at least I don’t get it) where people mess with their relationship status/interest and place a friend there, even though that’s not their orientation.

  3. Scott Hughes
    May 2, 2011 at 10:37 am #

    The reference to sexual preference is in error. “Preference” implies a choice as in one is better than the other. Not true. Sexual orientation is the correct reference.

    • May 2, 2011 at 10:39 am #

      Well, it’s hard to call it orientation, because we don’t know if they’re really gay or not. This is indeed a preference, in that they say they’re interested in a certain gender. It’s a bit different than asking one’s orientation.

      • Jonathan
        May 2, 2011 at 12:29 pm #

        Right, but what Scott is intimating is that one’s sexual attraction to others is not a “preference” (as in, “I have decided that I prefer steak over chicken”) so much as it is an undecided orientation, not based upon any single decision.

        Interesting data, by the way!

        • May 2, 2011 at 12:34 pm #

          I don’t disagree at all with that. I just don’t think what one checks on Facebook is necessarily their “orientation.” Even Facebook says “interested in.”

          Absolutely there’s a difference, I’m presenting it as they are. If it said, Gay, Straight, Bi-sexual, or labels along those lines, I’d have used the word “orientation.”

  4. AwesomeDude
    May 5, 2011 at 6:13 pm #

    Hi Brett,

    Can you delve into the methodology a bit? How was this data pulled succinctly from Facebook?

    Thanks,

    AD

    • May 5, 2011 at 9:56 pm #

      Well, the follow up article this past Tuesday explains it a little more. I used some search methods in Facebook to allow me to pull “likes” people listed on their profiles. This first one I used 9 likes, the second one I expanded it to 28.

  5. June 16, 2011 at 12:56 pm #

    Reel Movie News attended the Green Lantern red carpet premiere last night! We got interviews with most of the main cast, including Ryan Reynolds! Below is a link to our exclusive:

    http://www.reelmovienews.com/2011/06/green-lantern-premiere-did-ryan-reynolds-have-a-stunt-double/

    We encourage you to share our insight with your viewers; we only ask that you credit it and link it back to ReelMovieNews.com.

  6. Tal
    December 13, 2013 at 9:32 am #

    I’m curious to know if you got a sense of the % of total FB users who identified as being interested in comics vs those that didn’t. Basically trying to figure out the percentage of Americans that are interested in comics…?

    • December 13, 2013 at 9:46 am #

      That’s sort of what this is Tal. I looked at the number of Americans who like comics on Facebook. There are far more updated stats on this site you can find through the tags.

      • Tal
        January 24, 2014 at 7:19 pm #

        You’ve done a fantastic job collecting all kinds of data, but from what I can find all your stats deal with the demographics WITHIN those that identify as being comic readers, not % of comic readers within the ENTIRE US population, which is really the number I’m after.

        • January 24, 2014 at 7:26 pm #

          That’s right, this is self identified individuals. There’s no mechanism currently to gather what you want, so this is the best there is right now.

          • Tal
            January 24, 2014 at 7:44 pm #

            OK, thanks for responding.

  7. February 19, 2014 at 1:42 am #

    Reblogged this on a stat a day.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. BenjaminWoo.net » Blog Archive » A Fan by Any Other Name - May 7, 2011

    [...] column at Graphic Policy where he’s datamining Facebook for information about comic fans. In his first post, he described the age, gender composition, levels of educational attainment, relationship status, [...]

  2. The Webcomic Beacon | Episode #186 – Newscast for May 8th, 2011 - May 9, 2011

    [...] Survey of Who Print Comic Book Fans Are (Original Source: Graphic Policy – via Bleeding Cool) [...]

  3. Newscast for May 8th, 2011 | The Webcast Beacon Network - May 16, 2011

    [...] Survey of Who Print Comic Book Fans Are (Original Source: Graphic Policy – via Bleeding Cool) [...]

  4. Почему супергерои надевают костюмы, а супергероини норовят от них избавиться? « Ночник дневного смотрителя - May 29, 2011

    [...] спрос. И рождает. Это частично подтверждается в последнем исследовании Брета Шенкера (Brett Schenker), использовавшего «лайки» Facebook для [...]

  5. Comic Book’d – DC and Marvel’s Event Addiction : Massive Hysteria - June 30, 2011

    [...] readership in the past five years had gone up 13%.  That’s a big jump.  On Brent Schenker’s blog, he did a study and found that NINETY PERCENT of Facebook’s population who identified themselves [...]

  6. Kleefeld On Webcomics #35: Think Of The Children - October 28, 2011

    [...] specific demographic data is hard to come by, a recent study of 1.2 million self-identified comic fans found that 63% were between 18 and 30 years old. Another [...]

  7. How to Get More Superwomen in TV, Movies, and Comics - October 12, 2012

    [...] The average comic-book reader is a single man between the ages of 18 and 30 [...]

  8. Not Your Grandpa’s Comic Books » Public Libraries Online - December 3, 2012

    [...] they’re good for kids, but the majority of people who read comics are men and women from ages 18 to 452 Maybe you have to read Pride and Prejudice for a class but you find Austen’s writing too [...]

  9. The Fangirl Concern: About Gail Simone | StashMyComics.com - December 11, 2012

    [...] weed-out only the strictest of fans and under report the number of female readers when compared to social media measurement tools like Facebook  (five percent as compared to the 25% reported just back in 2011, [...]

  10. Leaving Proof 186 | School’s Out: The lessons of Ball State University and Christy Blanch’s Gender Through Comic Books course « The Comixverse - May 25, 2013

    […] put out material that appeals primarily to the heterosexual teen/adult male readership. An informal study conducted in 2011 by Graphic Policy’s Brett Schenker indicated that at least among Facebook […]

  11. Are Comics Still For Kids? | Geektout! - June 12, 2013

    […] in 2011 Graphic Policy conducted a survey using Facebook that looked at the demographic of comic readers based on the […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,995 other followers

%d bloggers like this: