Tag Archives: thunderbirds

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E8 EOS

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go sees a series of cascading equipment failures leads John to realise that rogue A.I. has gained control of Thunderbird 5. The programme is sending false monitor images to Tracy Island to deceive the other brothers. John finally gets through to Lady Penelope and informs her of the situation.

Well, one of the longer stories pays off in this episode as the issue that was raised in the previous episode “Runaway” returns in an episode that riffs on HAL and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

The episode is a good introduction to the horror genre for kids. It’s not overtly scary, but there’s more than enough there to get kids to be a bit tense as they watch the episode play out. Hell, as an adult I was a bit tense and wasn’t sure where the episode was going to go throughout.

With the episode taking place almost entirely in space, there’s lots of cool opportunity for the series to take advantage of zero gravity and strange perspectives and it takes advantage. There’s some solid action and some good problem solving items shown. It’s just a solid episode that bounces back from the last two which haven’t quite had the excitement from when the show launched.

While this isn’t a “save the world” type episode it has action and excitement, and while there’s not some major message within, there’s probably some lessons about technology that kids can take away.

It’s just another solid episode that’s as fun and exciting for adults as it is for kids too.

Overall Rating: 7.85

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E7 Runaway

©ITV PlcIn this episode of Thunderbirds Are Go, when a trains systems goes offline and it begins to crash, Scott and Brains must work together to get it’s engines back online. Even if it means Brains facing his fears.

Again the series forgoes the big picture political/social commentary instead of challenging different members of the teams to face personal issues much like last episodes theme of relying too much on technology. This one instead is about facing fears and at the same time it continues to build on this ongoing mystery story of the cloaked mysterious bad guy, the Hood.

Much like the last two episodes, we’re continuing to get a bit more of a long form story instead of some issue of the week. There’s a big bad out there and things are clearly building towards something. It’s nice to see the show continue to focus more on that type of storytelling on top of the action of the week. And, it’s clear by the revelation at the end of the episode that there’s more to come in that department.

And the action is solid as usual. There’s some good moments and it feels like a classic action television show with the usual good use of music. I think the series has been nailing it when it comes to that and each episode delivers in that aspect. I’ve never been disappointed as the action keeps on delivering.

While continues the slump from last week as far as quality, it’s still entertaining and shows the strength of the show and its ability to change things up a bit.

Overall Rating: 7.55

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E6 Unplugged

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go sees an anti-technology group called The Luddites power up an electromagnetic pulse device underneath London, crippling everything that uses electricity.

Again the series forgoes the big picture political/social commentary instead of challenging one member of the Thunderbirds team with doing his whole world saving thing without the use of all of his cool tools.

The life lesson is about solving issues just using your brains and not relying on the tech and a lesson at the end of choosing between saving an individual or getting the bad guy. It’s all pretty basic life lessons and nothing to crazy, but it’s rather exciting and fun.

What’s interesting is between this episode and the last one, we’re starting to get a bit more of a long form story instead of some issue of the week. There’s a big bad out there and things are clearly building towards something. It’s nice to see the show begin to focus more on that type of storytelling on top of the action of the week.

And the action is solid as usual. There’s some good moments and it feels like a classic action television show with the usual good use of music.

While the episode isn’t the best, it’s still entertaining and shows the strength of the show and its ability to change things up a bit.

Overall Rating: 7.65

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E5 Fireflash

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go sees Kayo departs on the newly upgraded Fireflash plane, but soon discovers that there is a saboteur on board. Meanwhile Virgil, Allan and Gordon must help save the passengers from harm.

In a slight departure from the last few episodes, this one doesn’t have a deeper meaning to it, which actually kind of surprised me. The episode, and its villain, is just a straight up hijacking form the mysterious villain. And then figuring out what to do with the plane to save everyone aboard. Yes, it’s that simple and a plot we’ve seen quite a few times before in lots of films and television shows. But, even having seen the plot, the story is a solid one.

What I think Thunderbirds Are Go does really well is the mix of action, animation, and the music, to create a package that’s fun an takes some of the best of the various things it draws from. The music feels like it’s out a Bond film and the action is fun and could be in a big budget film with lots of tense action. And as usual, the mix of CGI and miniatures is amazing. The look is fantastic in so many ways.

Episode after episode, this series is delivering in every way.

Overall Rating: 8.05

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E4 Crosscut

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go in the fourth episode sees Scott rushing in with Thunderbird 1 to check out an unusual radiation spike from a remote corner of Africa – and discovers the source to be a leak of unstable uranium.

This show is interesting to me in that it mixes some lessons about politics and the world in the form of entertainment and does so in a way that’s rather subtle. Previous episodes have focused on space junk and the resulting impacts of war, and this episode has a bit of a different focus instead with a message about nuclear power.

It’s not lost on me that the episode a few times mentions how the world has moved beyond nuclear power and that as an energy source it’s dangerous. The “enemy” here (who interestingly seems to have a South African accent) can easily be a stand-in for the nuclear lobby fighting against the change of focus when it comes to energy. While these are actual discussions when it comes to nuclear power, it could easily also have coal or fracking substituted in for nuclear power.

The episode also has a focus on nuclear proliferation and “loose nukes.” While this is much more subtle, it’s interesting that this too comes up a few times. The writers clearly have a viewpoint for the show when it comes to its politics an where the world stands at this moment in history.

But, even through that preaching and the lessons, the episode is full of excitement and action that kept me entertained. The series does an excellent job of keeping the main focus on that and seems to realize that no matter your message it doesn’t matter if the delivery isn’t entertaining.

That entertainment is helped by the shows fantastic mix of CGI and miniatures. It has a fantastic look about it all that has me glued watching it.

I wasn’t a fan of the original Thunderbirds series, but I am absolutely one now.

Overall Rating: 8.1

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E3 Space Race

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go keeps up the fun with a third episode that’s as much action as it is a message.

The episode has the team in space where the remnants of war remain, including space mines that threaten passing ships. So many questions I have after seeing this episode, but, that’s not what really matters here.

The episode is still a lot of action as the team figures out how to disarm the mine with a code that’s been lost due to time. As part of the team attempts to complete the code, other members do what they can to get the mine out of the way and keep it distracted so it doesn’t go off and kill someone.

The show continues to combine a tense feel and action in good amounts for kids and more than enough to keep adults entertained.

The episode also does a good job with a message too. In some ways it tackles the remnants of war, mines are a very real issue in quite a few places around the world. It also shows off the increasing amount of junk that exists in space that is a threat too. While the show doesn’t dive too deep discussing either, it’s still great to see pretty weighty topics discussed in a kids show.

The show isn’t too deep, but it’s fun and even as an adult I’m finding myself enjoying it so far.

Overall Rating: 8.1

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E1 and S1E2 Ring of Fire Parts 1 and 2

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go catapults the five brave Tracy brothers back onto television screens, where they’ll pilot their remarkable, cutting-edge Thunderbird vehicles from the depths of the oceans to the highest reaches of space, performing impossible rescues across the globe.

The new Amazon Prime series launches with all 13 episodes on April 22, but today sees the release of the one-hour special Ring of Fire Parts 1 and 2. Geared towards kids, there’s more than enough to keep adults entertained as the series gives us an updated vibe to the classic series. I know individuals might wince with my use of the word “updated,” but it works really well here as the show uses CGI while blending it with live-action model sets, new while paying homage to the classic Thunderbirds show. It’s not just the use of live-action models though, the show as pays tribute to the characters and locations of the original series.

From the first segment, the series is an action packed start will of intense situations and scenes where there’s actual tension for the viewers. It’s James Bond’s best action and stunts, but geared towards kids instead. International Rescue feels exactly that, an organization whose role is to save individuals around the world. Not much is explained as far as the specifics, but like a lot of solid adventures we’re just thrown into the action and accept what’s before us.

The story itself is fun, but it’s that updating of the imagery where I’m really impressed. While I watched some episodes of the classic show, the puppetry was a bit too outdated for me, but this blend of CGI and live-action models has a fantastic look about it. There’s just something that’s fun, not sure how else to put it.

But beyond the look, the score of these first episodes really stands out to me as well. There’s something epic about it all and helps create the tension and excitement on the screen.

With that updated look, lots of action, and a decent blend of humor the Thunderbirds Are Go is a perfect show for both kids and adults. I’m looking forward to diving in and checking out the rest of this first season.

Overall Rating: 8.4

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.

Gen Con 2015: Modiphius’ Pre-Orders, and Thunderbirds!

Modiphius Announces Official John Carter Gaming LineModiphius is heading to Gen Con and will be showing off the Thunderbirds board game prototype on the Modiphius stand every morning.

Modiphius is offering web pre-orders so you can buy online before or during the show and pick up from the Modiphius Gen Con stand at the same great show prices they’ll be offering on the growing range of Achtung! Cthulhu, Mindjammer, Cogs Cakes & Swordsticks and Mutant: Year Zero books including recent releases:

  • Mindjammer – Hearts & Minds: The first adventure for the FATE based sci-fi RPG
  • LUGU: A storytelling card game best described as DIXIT meets Rory’s Story Cubes. It’s a perfect convention game!

They’ll be located at booth #2530.

Thunderbirds Boardgame news!

Thunderbirds BoardgameModiphius Entertainment have announced a licensing deal with ITV Studios Global Entertainment to develop a co-operative tabletop board game based on the classic 1960s’ television series Thunderbirds.

Set in the year 2065, Thunderbirds follows the exploits of International Rescue: a secret organisation committed to saving human life, secretly founded and funded by the millionaire Tracy family. International Rescue has a host of technologically advanced land-, sea-, air-, and space-rescue vehicles and equipment ready to launch at a moments notice.

The game will be shown off at the London Toy Fair January 20th to 22nd.

To bring the ultimate Thunderbirds experience to the tabletop, Modiphius has partnered with Matt BrainsLeacock, designer of the hit games Pandemic, Forbidden Desert, and Forbidden Island.

Planned for release in Autumn 2015 and celebrating the 50th anniversary of the cult TV show, the game will feature the iconic Thunderbirds machines and a high octane world full of disasters for players to come to the rescue. The Thunderbirds co-operative game will have the usual high quality design and components that fans of games produced by Matt Leacock and Modiphius have come to expect.

Thunderbirds Boardgame 1