TV Review: Thunderbirds Are Go S1E4 Crosscut

©ITV PlcThunderbirds Are Go in the fourth episode sees Scott rushing in with Thunderbird 1 to check out an unusual radiation spike from a remote corner of Africa – and discovers the source to be a leak of unstable uranium.

This show is interesting to me in that it mixes some lessons about politics and the world in the form of entertainment and does so in a way that’s rather subtle. Previous episodes have focused on space junk and the resulting impacts of war, and this episode has a bit of a different focus instead with a message about nuclear power.

It’s not lost on me that the episode a few times mentions how the world has moved beyond nuclear power and that as an energy source it’s dangerous. The “enemy” here (who interestingly seems to have a South African accent) can easily be a stand-in for the nuclear lobby fighting against the change of focus when it comes to energy. While these are actual discussions when it comes to nuclear power, it could easily also have coal or fracking substituted in for nuclear power.

The episode also has a focus on nuclear proliferation and “loose nukes.” While this is much more subtle, it’s interesting that this too comes up a few times. The writers clearly have a viewpoint for the show when it comes to its politics an where the world stands at this moment in history.

But, even through that preaching and the lessons, the episode is full of excitement and action that kept me entertained. The series does an excellent job of keeping the main focus on that and seems to realize that no matter your message it doesn’t matter if the delivery isn’t entertaining.

That entertainment is helped by the shows fantastic mix of CGI and miniatures. It has a fantastic look about it all that has me glued watching it.

I wasn’t a fan of the original Thunderbirds series, but I am absolutely one now.

Overall Rating: 8.1

The first season of Thunderbirds Are Go will be available for Prime members to stream and enjoy using the Amazon Video app for TVs, connected devices including Amazon Fire TV, and mobile devices, or online, at no additional cost to their membership. Customers who are not already a Prime member can sign up for a free trial.