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Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #7

Dark Nights: Death Metal #7

And this is it, the end of Dark Nights: Death Metal and the launch of a new DC Universe. The “Crisis Event” by a different name wraps up with Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 launching into a new era where anything can happen. The results, like much of the event, are a mixed bag.

Written by Scott Snyder, the series sees one final clash between the heroes and villains of the DC Universe taking a stand against the Darkest Knight. It’s an issue filled with grand ideas and grand visuals as Wonder Woman is front and center in the battle. Snyder makes things interesting by having unexpected characters make unexpected sacrifices. It keeps readers on their toes as to what might happen next and by who.

There’s some interesting concepts about the creation of the DC Universe thrown in and the various boundaries that have existed. In a meta sense the discussion of these boundaries is the most interesting aspect. It feels like a stance as to what has hampered the various eras of DC Comics. A limitation of worlds or multiverses or worlds is all brought up. In the end though, all of it is made cannon and an infinite number of possibilities is left on the table. What’s now possible is the real lasting impact and what’s hinted at to come is the most intriguing. Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 feels like the end to a messy attempt to right the ship. DC has stated in the past they’ve wanted continuity to not matter as much and the ability to tell whatever stories they’ve wanted. Dark Nights: Death Metal creates a clearer slate to do so. It took them a while but they’re finally really there with a best of all worlds scenario.

The art of the comic is over the top as expected. Greg Capullo handles most of the duties with Jonathan Glapion inking, FCO Plascencia on color and Tom Napolitano on lettering. Yanick Paquette and Bryan Hitch also provide pencils and inks while Nathan Fairbairn and Alex Sinclair also provide colors. The art is as it has been. There’s some very solid moments worth of the big screen and other moments that just feel off. The art itself feels a bit more “death metal” than previous issues as character die or battle it out in spectacular ways but overall there’s little images that feel iconic. For such a big event, the story and art come off as a bit forgettable. What they lead to is the bigger aspect. There’s a missing of that “it” moment.

While I can’t quite recommend Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 I also can’t quite say you can skip it either. It’s a curiosity more than anything else. It’s the end to an era and leading into what’s next shaking up the status-quo for DC Comics. If you’re interested in seeing how that comes about, it’s worth checking out. If not, then this is one you can pass on.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo, Yanick Paquette, Bryan Hitch Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Ink: Jonathan Glapion, Yanick Paquette, Bryan Hitch Color: FCO Plascencia, Nathan Fairbairn, Alex Sinclair
Story: 6.5 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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