Tag Archives: nathan fairbairn

Mavel Reveals War of Realms #1 Variants from George Prez and Ryan Ottley

The War Of The Realms is coming…and no corner of the Marvel Universe will be untouched! Marvel has revealed two new stunning variant covers: one by artist George Perez (with colors by Jason Keith) and one by Ryan Ottley (with colors Nathan Fairbairn).

This April, all hell will break loose as Marvel’s epic event from the award-winning creative team of Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matthew Wilson usher in an event of unparalleled scale! Plus, don’t miss a special midnight release of War of the Realms #1 for retailers – be sure to check Marvel mailers for details!

War of the Realms #1 Ryan Ottley Variant
War of the Realms #1 George Perez variant

Review: Die!Die!Die! #6

Die! Die! Die! #6

I read the first issue of this series and while I enjoyed it, it also felt like it was an over the top violent series whose violence is the draw. It was Bond mixed with Tarantino where it’s not enough to dispatch the enemy, it’s about how you do it. Does the head explode? What instrument do you use to stab?

Die!Die!Die #6 had an opportunity to bring in new readers in a week where there’s not much on the shelves and instead of a solid entry point, we’re delivered an issue deep into the story with a rather confusing plot and too many references not explained. Die!Die!Die #6 is for those already in the know and reading the series.

Robert Kirkman and Scott M. Gimple deliver an issue that’s an origin of sorts but has so many sidetracks it’s hard to stay focused an interested. Instead of just delivering on an origin, that’d be a draw, it meanders through the grand conspiracy that only really makes sense if you’ve read the previous five issues.

There is a lot that’s great here though and that’s what’s frustrating. Instead of just focusing on one or two aspects the issue packs too much in with too little explanation. We get the “origin” of the “Beatles kids” and that alone should have been the focus of the issue. But, we also get agents in the field and bits about political jockeying. There’s a bit too much and the comic comes off as unfocused.

The art by Chris Burnham with color by Nathan Fairbairn, and lettering by Rus Wooton is solid. There’s brothers involved, quadruplets actually, and each is given a style unto themselves to differentiate them. There’s the expected blood and gore and all together the art creates a stage that defies the violent and twisted content within. And that seems to be part of the point. It comes together as if classical music is played during a murder scene and the scene itself is rather calm and serene.

The issue is a fine one if you’ve been reading the series put it comes off a bit as a bit unfocused with the wrong lessons taken from Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon’s work. All violence and flash and little more. An issue that just told one or two aspects of everything covered within would have not just been more of a winner but also a better entry point, and hook, for a week when there’s so little on the shelf and higher chance folks will check the series out.

Story: Robert Kirkman, Scott M. Gimple Art: Chris Burnham
Color: Nathan Fairbairn Lettering Rus Wooton
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Captain Marvel Blasts onto Comic Covers This February!

Captain Marvel is heading to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and Marvel is celebrating the legacy of Carol Danvers with special variant covers from superstar artists Mike Hawthrone, Gerald Parel, Pepe Larraz, Valerio Schiti and Jesus Saiz!

Look for Marvel’s Captain Marvel variant covers on these select titles:

  1. AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #16 by Mike Hawthorne with colors by Nathan Fairbairn
  2. AVENGERS #15 by Gerald Parel
  3. CHAMPIONS #2 by Pepe Larraz
  4. FANTASTIC FOUR #4 by Valerio Schiti with colors by Rachelle Rosenberg
  5. SUPERIOR SPIDER-MAN #3 by Jesus Saiz

Don’t miss your chance to collect all five variant covers, coming to comic shops this February!

Oni Press Announces New Editions of Scott Pilgrim Celebrating 15 Years

Next year marks the 15th anniversary of the release of the bestsellinScott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life, so it’s leveling up! On April 10, 2019, Bryan Lee O’Malley’s notorious Scott Pilgrim returns to print with three individual color collections as well as a box set of the three collections with art by Bryan Lee O’Malley, colored by the Joe Shuster Award-winning creator, Nathan Fairbairn.

The New York Times bestselling series and basis for the movie Scott Pilgrim vs. The World  is now available in a new full-color softcover format! This Color Collection Box Set contains all six volumes of the award-winning series in three massive books that might wreak havoc on your bookshelf. But the memories will be worth it! Laugh as slacker Scott Pilgrim tries and sometimes fails to get his life together and win the heart of the literal girl of his dreams, Ramona Flowers! Cry when things look bleak for our heroes! Make a confused face at the countless Canadian references! (Unless you live in Canada already.) The perfect gift for a Scottoholic—or for anyone discovering the bestselling series for the first time.

Scott Pilgrim is an Oni Press classic, and is recommended for teen and adult readers new to comics. The box set is priced at $89.99, with the individual collections at $29.99.

Review: Die!Die!Die!

Die!Die!Die! bills itself as a blood-soaked, no holds barred, action-packed, irreverent story. The series focuses on a world where evil people do evil stuff all the time. A secret cabal within the United States government influences world matters through targeted assassination. The world around us is manipulated right under our noses, mostly for the better… but sometimes for individual gain, and sometimes for the fun of it.

Written by Robert Kirkman and Scott M. Gimple, Die!Die!Die! feels like the creative team channeling Garth Ennis with over the top torture, blood, copious amounts of drugs, and some nudity. The story too feels very Ennis with a secret cabal sending out killers to… well kill.

The story itself is over the top and feels like a departure in a way from what I’d expect in the more character focused Kirkman series like The Walking Dead and Oblivion. That’s not the focus here, it’s clearly the action, and that’s not a bad thing.

The bloody action is presented by Chris Burnham with colors from Nathan Fairbairn and lettering from Rus Wooton. And boy is that bloody action presented. Things are over the top in an almost comedic fashion that turns it from gross to something almost mocking the genre in a way. The characters are interesting and action decent but again, like the writing, the art is a reminder of Ennis’ partnership with Steve Dillon, in particular their work on Preacher.

There’s a clear reader who will absolutely enjoy this debut issue, fans of Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon. There’s an over the top aspect of it all that desensitizes the violence in a way that makes it comedic. The comic was a surprise for fans and retailers and what’s inside too is surprising as it’s a departure from Kirkman’s other current series. If you like a little bit of ultraviolence to the point of borderline spoof, this is one to check out.

Story: Robert Kirkman, Scott M. Gimple Art: Chris Burnham
Color: Nathan Fairbairn Letterer: Rus Wooton
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Skybound Announces a Surprise Release with Die!Die!Die! Out Wednesday

In a shocking move, Image Comics and Skybound Entertainment dropped the first issue of an all-new series by comics titans Robert Kirkman, Scott M. Gimple, and Chris Burnham, with colors by Nathan Fairbairn and lettering by Rus Wooton, titled Die!Die!Die! which will be available for sale tomorrow.

Die!Die!Die! promises to be a blood-soaked, no holds barred, action-packed, irreverent story that fans won’t be able to rip their eyes from. We live in an evil world where evil people do evil stuff all the time and Die!Die!Die! lifts the veil on a secret cabal within the United States government that influences world matters through targeted assassination. The world around us is manipulated right under our noses, mostly for the better… but sometimes for individual gain, and sometimes for the fun of it.

So if you’re hurting people, somehow making the world worse than it already is, or even just standing in the way of something good happening… someone could right now be giving the order for you to… DIE!DIE!DIE!

Die!Die!Die! #1 is available in stores tomorrow. Don’t miss it!

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #300

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

It cannot be an easy thing to write a character for a long time and consistently come up with unique things, especially when it’s a superhero, but I am happy to say that Gerry Duggan did just that with Deadpool. Wade Wilson has always been a mouthy, hard to kill, merc who has given us stories that are dark but filled with humor, but Duggan took that to a new level with his run. From fighting Dead Presidents, the Uncanny Avengers, the Mercs for Money, to the original way Duggan told stories during Secret Empire, there was always something refreshing and new.

The Despicable Deadpool #300 continues the theme of super violent cartoons, which is basically an adult Looney Tunes (as I have said before adults can watch Looney Tunes too!). It marries violence with dark humor. It’s the jokes you cringe at sometimes, but still laugh. It’s like Family Guy, South Park, but in a comic book with basically an invincible superhero. So often superhero titles are filled with serious plots, and that is fine, and sure others have some humor, especially Marvel titles, but it leaves room for things like Harley Quinn and Deadpool. Titles like these go for the uber-silly, and all bets are off for breaking the fourth wall, and going into territory many of the other titles just can’t.

This comic brings a lot of the running themes and jokes in Duggan’s run to a close in what you can expect in this title. There’s plenty of gross, plenty of ridiculousness, plenty of violence, and plenty of comedy. Even if the jokes don’t always land, it almost seems intentional. Wade isn’t some top level stand up comic, he’s more like a hacky amateur at open mic night throwing out everything that is in his head. It’s also his coping mechanism, as this arc and issue show us Wade wishing to die, by putting a price on his own head. He’s a sad character, but he is also funny. This is reflective of many people we may know in pop culture, and in our own personal lives. These clowns that we watch perform for us, just trying to make us and themselves laugh, while dealing with real pain.

You can’t do a comic book without art, and this oversized issue gives us quite a bit of great varying style pencils Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne. The first part of the book deals with the gross, but it still found a way to make me laugh. The way many Marvel characters we know and love show up to deal with Deadpool, but for reasons I wont spoil, vomit all over the place, was creative, and so stupid in that perfect Deadpool way. Miss Marvel’s cheeks growing to a massive size has to be the highlight. The panel work showing all of it was creative and funny. The car chase sequence was also awesome, and quite classic Deadpool. This part of the book was the most traditional for the series, with it bringing a more cartoon style, which fit the action perfectly. For the final sequence, we get some really off the wall sequences as we prepare to wrap the issue up. There’s some really fantastic panel work here as well, showing Wade hook an IV up for himself, all inside of little panels while you see the main “shot” taking up the full page below the panels.

The inks by Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne are all as equally varied as the pencils. Each section of the book (which the art is cut into a section by three artists) gives us sharp lines, great shadows, and good depth to our characters. Much like the pencils and colors, there is a lot of inking done in this oversized issue, and the quality never dips. The colors by Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond, and Jordie Bellaire all range from a more muted tone approach in the first section of the book, where we see everyone vomiting orange and yellow, and as gross as this scene intentionally is, the colors work to not make it as gross as it could have been. The next section gives the brighter colored cartoon approach as I mentioned earlier, and gives us brighter reds, blues, and makes the superhero costumes we know and love pop. In the final section, it is more muted tones again, and gives us a nice colored pencil look to the artwork. The hell sequence in particular is awesome and the fire looks like it could come off of the page.

I would recommend this book to Deadpool fans old and new, and there’s really something special for you if you’ve followed this run. But even if you haven’t, and you want something so dumb, but in a good way, this is the comic for you. Deadpool is about taking your brain off and having a blast, and every once in awhile it gives you a touching moment, but after that, it may give you a fart joke, and I love it for that. Congratulations to all of the talented writers and artists that worked on this run and helped make it so fun and interesting. Now let’s see what the next run brings us for the Merc with the Mouth!

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli & Mike Hawthorne Inks: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, Terry Pallot, Craig Young & Mike Hawthorne Colors: Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond & Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #299

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

We have one more issue of Gerry Duggan on Deadpool, and it is bittersweet for me. I love what he has done with the character, even at times making him a full on hero with the other book he wrote for awhile, The Uncanny Avengers. He has been a part of The Unity Squad, worked for Hydra-Cap or as Wade refers to him, Stevil Rogers during Secret Empire, and even had another classic battle with his friend and foe, Cable. Duggan has brilliantly kept Wade a hilarious character, but wasn’t afraid to show the darkness in him too.

Deadpool is similar to Spider-Man in that he jokes, even when he may feel uncomfortable. The difference is, Wade is a far darker and more tragic character. Peter Parker is hiding his identity, so he wears a mask. Wade is hiding his horribly scarred face, so that’s why he wears one. He was a lab experiment, and has massive amounts of PTSD, but he just jokes about everything, because life has become a joke to him. However, in this run, he finally had some people that he cared about. He had people he trusted. Now don’t get me wrong, Deadpool didn’t all of a sudden become a saint. He still ran the Mercs For Money, and ripped all of his fellow conmen off, leading them to want to join in on the fun of killing him that many other villains, and now SHIELD agents share.

In The Despicable Deadpool #299, we continue to see Wade double down on his ridiculous plan. He has put out a hit on himself, and many villains, and his former mercs, and some others who he wronged, are out to collect the reward. Again, this is a great joke, but it is also very tragic. Wade wants to die. There’s a part of him who has become a joke because his life has fallen apart. Again, and again, and this time he really seemed to try hard to be as good as he could, and for awhile he was an actual hero. Now he has returned to the why bother anti-hero mentality, but with a bigger disregard for his life than he’s had in recent years. I am not saying Deadpool is Shakespeare, but there is an element to it that reflects those kind of tragedies. There’s just more vulgar jokes mixed in.

The artwork consists of Mike Hawthorne on pencils, Terry Pallot on inks, and Jordie Bellaire on colors, and they give a style you can expect from a Deadpool book. It’s cartoonish, which fits the ridiculous nature of the comic, but also has a hint of a realistic look to it. Sure, all comic books may apply to these styles in some way shape or form, but Deadpool is the perfect comic to walk that line between the over the top style of cartoon violence in something like Looney Tunes and an R-rated action film like John Wick. It’s always been the way the Deadpool books have been drawn, and this title stays to that consistency, and that is a good thing.

I recommend this title for anyone who wants not only a light, fun read that is adult in nature, but also anyone who wants to see how this great run by Duggan and company will come to a close. The next issue is super sized, and this one mostly dealt with a lot of set up. There’s a bunch of pieces in play from throughout Duggan’s plots that are all going to come to what I imagine will be a ridiculous, and awesome head in Deadpool #300. This is going to be a blast, especially with Deadpool 2 hitting theaters soon.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Mike Hawthorne
Inks: Terry Pallot Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #298

F6B941B0-6E78-4459-9135-97409830283DReading Deadpool can feel like a darker, more adult version of Looney Tunes. If you took Wile Coyote, Bugs Bunny, and made them swear more, you’d basically have the Merc with the Mouth. The Despicable Deadpool #298 continues those over the top cartoon moments in a big way, and this title is going to miss Gerry Dugan writing it. The next run of the book is bringing on Skottie Young, who while he may be more known for his art, is no stranger to wacky over the top tales with his own I Hate Fairyland. That being said, I am still sad that Duggan is done in a few issues.

As a series, Deadpool usually doesn’t pretend to portray a kind, caring, or compassionate hero like we usually get with our heroes in Marvel Comics. Sure, he had a moment in this run and when he was on The Uncanny Avengers and aspiring to be better, since he looked up to Steve Rogers so much, but that was short lived. After the events of Secret Empire, and Hydra-Cap tricking Wade to do horrible things, Deadpool has given up the hero idea. Not only has he lost people, and killed people that he regrets killing, Deadpool now also has a bounty on him. This issue brings some great villains like The Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye, who are all out to get the $20 million reward on Deadpool’s head.

The pencils by Mike Hawthorne are great throughout the book. He keeps everything moving at a fast and funny pace with non-stop action as Deadpool tries to fight off the villains who are trying to collect the bounty. Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye all look fantastic, and so does Wade. The style by Hawthorne walks the line between realism and cartoonish. It balances the ridiculousness of a cartoon style story perfectly with the real world setting, and it works perfectly for a Deadpool book. Jordie Bellaire on colors and Terry Pallot on inks bring the pencils to life. The combination of the three of them really make the artwork standout on the book, and give even more humor to an already funny book. A Deadpool comic has to have funny moments in the artwork, and not just the words alone, and this issue is no different.

If you like Deadpool comics, you will be right at home with this issue. It’s silly comfort food, much like cartoons. Sometimes this book makes me laugh, sometimes it makes me surprised, but it always makes me smile. I don’t need to think of multiverses, or timelines, or anything deep, and while those things are wonderful in other titles, I love that Deadpool is simply unapologetic. You know what you’re getting most of the time in this series, and that’s okay.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Mike Hawthorne
Inks: Terry Pallot Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn

Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Raven: Daughter of Darkness #2

Raven: Daughter of Darkness #2

Story: Marv Wolfman Art: Pop Mhan Cover: Yanick Paquette, Nathan Fairbairn
Color: Lovern Kindzierski Letterer: Saida Temofonte
Group Editor: Marie Javins Assistant Editor: Michael McCalister Faceless Adversary: Joey Cavalieri
In Shops: Feb 28, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Trigon attacks! Raven must defend herself from her own father! The balance between good and evil is upset, and Baron Winters predicts Raven will die! Is she beyond the help of the Night Force?

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