Tag Archives: fco plascencia

Nuclear Family banner ad

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #7

Dark Nights: Death Metal #7

And this is it, the end of Dark Nights: Death Metal and the launch of a new DC Universe. The “Crisis Event” by a different name wraps up with Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 launching into a new era where anything can happen. The results, like much of the event, are a mixed bag.

Written by Scott Snyder, the series sees one final clash between the heroes and villains of the DC Universe taking a stand against the Darkest Knight. It’s an issue filled with grand ideas and grand visuals as Wonder Woman is front and center in the battle. Snyder makes things interesting by having unexpected characters make unexpected sacrifices. It keeps readers on their toes as to what might happen next and by who.

There’s some interesting concepts about the creation of the DC Universe thrown in and the various boundaries that have existed. In a meta sense the discussion of these boundaries is the most interesting aspect. It feels like a stance as to what has hampered the various eras of DC Comics. A limitation of worlds or multiverses or worlds is all brought up. In the end though, all of it is made cannon and an infinite number of possibilities is left on the table. What’s now possible is the real lasting impact and what’s hinted at to come is the most intriguing. Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 feels like the end to a messy attempt to right the ship. DC has stated in the past they’ve wanted continuity to not matter as much and the ability to tell whatever stories they’ve wanted. Dark Nights: Death Metal creates a clearer slate to do so. It took them a while but they’re finally really there with a best of all worlds scenario.

The art of the comic is over the top as expected. Greg Capullo handles most of the duties with Jonathan Glapion inking, FCO Plascencia on color and Tom Napolitano on lettering. Yanick Paquette and Bryan Hitch also provide pencils and inks while Nathan Fairbairn and Alex Sinclair also provide colors. The art is as it has been. There’s some very solid moments worth of the big screen and other moments that just feel off. The art itself feels a bit more “death metal” than previous issues as character die or battle it out in spectacular ways but overall there’s little images that feel iconic. For such a big event, the story and art come off as a bit forgettable. What they lead to is the bigger aspect. There’s a missing of that “it” moment.

While I can’t quite recommend Dark Nights: Death Metal #7 I also can’t quite say you can skip it either. It’s a curiosity more than anything else. It’s the end to an era and leading into what’s next shaking up the status-quo for DC Comics. If you’re interested in seeing how that comes about, it’s worth checking out. If not, then this is one you can pass on.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo, Yanick Paquette, Bryan Hitch Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Ink: Jonathan Glapion, Yanick Paquette, Bryan Hitch Color: FCO Plascencia, Nathan Fairbairn, Alex Sinclair
Story: 6.5 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle Zeus Comics

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #6

Dark Nights: Death Metal #6

I haven’t been the biggest fan of Dark Nights: Death Metal. The event as a whole has been uneven with an inconsistent voice. In an “anything can happen” sense, the comic has been fun for its insanity. That could have been part of the point and concept. As it begins to wrap up, we begin to get the big hits and moments. The heroes rally to take on the Darkest Knight and his nightmare worlds in their last stand. Dark Nights: Death Metal #6 is a combination of the night before the final battle in Les Miserable and Steve Rogers saying “I can do this all day”. The heroes rally to take on the forces against them as Wonder Woman attempts to succeed in her mission.

Writer Scott Snyder puts together an interesting mix of over the top imagery and touching moments in an issue that has a focus of that “last stand”. While gods battle above them, the remaining heroes and villains of Earth draw the line against the nightmare Batman gunning for them. Where Snyder hits it is his “grouping” of heroes putting an emphasis that these are families. While they may oppose each other at times, there’s something touching seeing the various pockets of the DC Universe standing together. Heroes and villains taking a stand of survival knowing their battle is likely a lost one with the slimmest of chances of success. Those moments are far too short but they deliver some heart to the bombastic issue that also sees a fight at a cosmic scale.

Part of the fun of the comic is its over the top visuals. Greg Capullo continues to deliver events on a grand scale. Characters are packed into pages or deities battle it out in space. Dark Nights: Death Metal #6, and the series as a whole, is one that’s very much a “show”. The comic seems to love going over the top in its imagery knowing its popcorn level of entertainment. This isn’t one about body language or facial expressions, this is about massive battles and tons of characters. Capullo is joined by Jonathan Glapion on ink and FCO Plascencia on color.

Tom Napolitano handles the lettering which stands out with such characters as Jarro. The slightly different lettering brings character to “Batman’s son”. The series as a whole has been gonzo in its designs bringing to the page some of the craziest ideas DC has presented in years and doing it all with the glee of a kid playing with their toys.

While Dark Nights: Death Metal #6 hasn’t won me over on the event, it does have its moments. There’s some of those that bring the good schmaltz. There’s far more that are popcorn worthy summer blockbuster visuals. It’s a turn off your brain and enjoy the ride of a comic and at times that’s a good thing.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo
Ink: Jonathan Glapion Color: FCO Plascencia Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.95 Overall: 7.15 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #5

Dark Nights: Death Metal #5

There’s a point in recent DC events for me where the story becomes too much insider knowledge of DC Comic history. They often can feel like one needs a Ph.D. in DC Continuity to truly understand what’s going on. While Dark Nights: Death Metal #5 doesn’t quite cross that line, it comes right up to it.

Written by Scott Snyder, Dark Nights: Death Metal #5 has the heroes desperately attempting to save the day. The Batman Who Laughs has ascended to god-hood level battling Perpetua for the future of the multiverse. The remaining heroes are ants witnessing giants step around them battling at a cosmic level. But, there’s always hope as a plan is hatched in an attempt to turn the tide and defeat evil.

The event has been full of discussions of “Crisis Energy” weaving in DC’s history of multiverse shattering events. This issue introduces “Anti-Crisis Energy”, a concept when typed out feels a little silly. X hasn’t worked so its opposite will work is the general idea. Presented by Lex Luthor, the heroes are tasked with missions to either drain The Batman Who Laughs energy or seek out a solution to save the multiverse. Dark Nights: Death Metal #5 for one comic generally stops being a spot the different versions of Batman, and instead focuses on the heroes getting together for their final stand.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #5 does bring some reveals as Batman and Superman finally come clean to what’s been hinted for some time. Neither of the revelations are surprising and what they mean for their future is unknown. What the comic does do is focus the event again around Wonder Woman, seeking truth to shine the light of hope. We get some rousing speeches and those “pop” moments of heroes looking at impossible tasks but the issue really is another launching point for what comes next. It’s the “explanation” of how the heroes will win, something that feels like it’s been done a few times already in the event.

Greg Capullo‘s art continues to be the draw of the series. Along with Jonathan Glapion in ink, FCO Plascencia on color, and lettering by Tom Napolitano, there’s some very cool visuals that’ll leave you lingering on the page. Capullo can hit the beat of Snyder’s writing and the two show off their connection of writer and artist that has been built over so many years. And while there’s a few solid moments, the product overall also feels a little forgettable. There’s a lack of iconic imagery so far. It looks great but five minutes later there’s little you really want to go back and look at.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #5 is a fine chapter to the overall event and improved on previous issues. There’s more of a consistent voice from the issue. It knows what it is a bit more. The mix of gonzo, comedy, epic, horror, and superheroes is shrunk down to be more focused on the epic superhero event. It continues an overall frustrating event. It’s clear that this is the vessel by which DC will land the path set out by “Rebirth” but whose tone screams New 52. It wants to create new things and concepts but also is beholden to DC of the past. It’s an event whose chapters have been lesser than the whole, an example being one-shots better than the main series. Much like DC continuity, it’s a bit mixed for everyone. At this point, it feels like an end of the journey and I more want to see where it goes and what’s next than the details of the event itself.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo
Ink: Jonathan Glapion Color: FCO Plascencia Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 6.95 Art: 7.95 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #4

Dark Nights: Death Metal #4

For so many issues, I’ve attempted to figure out what hasn’t sat well with me about Dark Nights: Death Metal. Part of my issue is that this event is clearly the latest DC “Crisis,” but it feels like the publisher is afraid to call it such. The next is that there’s very little “metal” about the comic, let alone “death metal” as it was promoted. But, it’s with Dark Nights: Death Metal #4 where I think it has clicked what hasn’t worked for me.

The comic, the event as a whole, feels like all of the weird alternative Batman figures Kenner would release for films. Arctic Batman. Toxic Sewage Batman. Urban Commando Batman. All I wanted was Batman. The comic is much like that throwing out concepts left and right without much explanation or depth beyond “they exist”. Like those 1990s toys, Dark Night: Death Metal feels like gattling gun of concepts, many of which don’t feel like they fit the “voice” or even together. Some may enjoy that but there’s a point where too little explanation or ideas too out there begin to stand out and seem a little silly.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #4 opens with a recap of what you might have missed. Yes, four issues in and it already needs to catch up readers. That’s because important events have occurred outside of the series in a few one-shots. I questioned those one-shots existing and not being part of the main story and still do. The fact they need to be recapped makes me as a reader feel like I’m not far off in that feeling. Things are desperate at this point. How do we know? Our narrator, the head of Sgt. Rock, tells us.

Writer Scott Snyder doesn’t hide what he’s going for in this issue. It’s the part of the story where things are darkest. They look bleak for our heroes with the odds against them and a chance they may lose. Dark Nights: Death Metal #4 is rather predictable like that, unfortunately. The twists, the turns, it’s all easy to see from a mile away. There’s little surprising about the issue which serves as a bridge from the previous arc to what comes next. And what comes next might be interesting. Maybe. We’ll see. So, this issue feels like a necessity to get us to the next story arc.

A lot of the issue revolves around Superboy Prime who has Wonder Woman hostage and is part of The Batman Who Laughs’ plan. Unless you’re really invested into the character, the fact so much of the comic might fall flat. It does for me. He’s a bad guy. I know he’s important in DC history. But, I have no connection to him. And that again reminds me of an issue of so many DC events like this. Unless you really know DC’s history, there’s going to be key moments or characters that just stumble. It rewards long-time readers more so than new readers and there’s a bit where that tilts too far. DC often tilts too far in the “long time reader” direction.

The art by Greg Capullo continues to be the more interesting aspect of the series. There’s a lot packed in at times and some solid switching of styles at times. Batman being torn part is one of the most interesting visual aspects of the entire series so far. Jonathan Glapion handles the ink while FCO Plascencia handles colors with Tom Napolitano on lettering. The art is good, though there’s moments that just don’t ring visually. When a key part of the plan doesn’t work the art doesn’t evoke the moment enough. The final panel reveal doesn’t have the punch it should. For every interesting thing like a world shattered, there’s something that falls flat.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #4 just generally falls flat. The comic is predictable far too often. There’s parts are non-sensical at times, a big moment being when our heroes are freed (not really a spoiler). It’s a ride though that focuses on desperation and delivering that emotion to the readers to get them interested. It’s a chapter in the bigger story and will be completely fine as such in a popcorn read sort of way. On it’s own though, it just doesn’t quite work for me.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo
Ink: Jonathan Glapion Color: FCO Plascencia Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.15 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – AmazonKindle – Zeus Comics

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #3

Dark Nights: Death Metal #3

Dark Nights: Death Metal #3 is an interesting issue. With its “rock” aesthetic, the issue is one that’s more about hope. It’s the moment in the story where the heroes rally and their plan is laid out for the reader. It also, much like the previous issue, isn’t quite sure what it wants to be. There’s a lot of silliness in the issue that feels like it clashes with the “death metal” title. But, is it really “death metal” in attitude? As we learn in this issue, and as expected, nope, the title has a different meaning than pitched.

Written by Scott Snyder with art by Greg Capullo, Dark Nights: Death Metal #3 has our gang of heroes rushing to Apokolips to free Superman and turn the tide of battle. As we learn, there’s much more than Superman being focused on when it comes to the plan in this issue. And that’s a good thing keeping the event from another “Trinity” focused event where Batman is the center of things. Instead, Wonder Woman has taken center stage and in her rallying speech, we can see why as she represents the hope that the heroes need.

But, the issue has a weird tonal issue. It wants to be “death metal” in its visuals but then gives us the silliness that is a giant robot, a time travel gun, yet more colors of Kryptonite, and a certain scene. It all ties into things from the past so fits. There’s nothing new, it’s a lot of winks, nods, and celebrations of what has come before. But, there’s a goofiness about it all that betrays the “hard” rock and roll style Capullo and Snyder pitched in the lead up. Spikes on a shoulder pad doesn’t create “death metal.” There’s also some big questions as to the why as far as The Batman Who Laughs’ actions. There’s some wide open aspects where you question his genius and cunning. For a ruthless Batman who has killed who knows how many, he’s left a lot of opposition alive.

Capullo’s art continues to be interesting. Much like the story, there’s a mix of attempting to deliver a serious metal look and the jokes within. Visually the comic feels like the “Rebirth” DC Universe breaking through the doom and gloom of the past. It also makes me think that this series and its previous chapter would have been the bridge from the New 52 to Rebirth that was needed. The dark seriousness transforming to the hope. In some ways visually, the comic feels like that might be the point, especially weighing in on Wonder Woman’s speech. This may be that final chapter to really transition from what was to what is. Capullo is joined by Jonathan Glapion on inks, FCO Plascencia on colors, and Tom Napolitano on lettering. As has been, everyone does a solid job and there are a certain excitement and energy about it all.

I’m still not sold on Dark Nights: Death Metal #3 and the series as a whole. I get a feeling I can see the meta at work but won’t know until the series wraps up. It really does feel like a final chapter in the New 52 aspect of the DC Universe putting the final nails in that chapter. But, there’s still issues to go and a lot of directions the series can take. While the individual issues have had a sense of entertainment, this may be a series to truly judge as a whole instead of its individual parts.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo
Ink: Jonathan Glapion Color: FCO Plascencia Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.95 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Written by: Scott Snyder
Art by: Greg Capullo

Get ready to scream! Wonder Woman roars across the horrifying Dark Multiverse landscape in the world’s most demented monster truck, with Swamp Thing riding shotgun! The two arrive at the ghoulish cemetery base of Batman and his army of zombies, but can the former friends stand each other long enough to form a plan and take back the planet? Plus, what’s Lobo doing in space? Don’t miss the second chapter of the wildest ride in the DC Universe, from the epic team of writer Scott Snyder and artist Greg Capullo!

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

There’s a bit of over the top fun in Dark Nights: Death Metal #2. It’s an issue that has the heroes gathering for their next step to defeat evil while the villains make their move to create an even bigger threat. It’s also generally forgettable.

Written by Scott Snyder with art by Greg Capullo, Dark Nights: Death Metal #2‘s more entertaining moments are the variations on Batman they can come up with. For the most part, the comic doesn’t feel very “death metal”. Instead of being ramped up to 11, it feels more like a cover band thinking they’re doing so.

The Batman Who Laughs has been vanquished by Wonder Woman. This leads to a scramble to fill the void and for the heroes to get the upper hand. That means traveling to a mysterious location to rally the troops to take the fight elsewhere. It’s very Dungeons & Dragons gathering of the party before the quest.

Snyder and Capullo have put together some really interesting concepts and visuals that for some reason just feel… off. Batman’s wearing spikes on his shoulders, Swamp Thing is wearing glasses, we get what feels like a half dozen new evil-Batman. There’s a lot thrown into the issue that feels like interesting twists and ideas. Unfortunately, the ideas are never really fleshed out. Instead, we just go with the flow and accept this reality. It is, what it is. They’re thrown out there without explanation or real reason. It’s a fun “visual” comic that has a story. It’s not an engaging story with fun visuals.

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 also prepares us for what comes next. The issue drops numerous hints that this should be called “Crisis and the Dark Multiverse”. Discussions of rebooting the universe and “infinite possibilities” are thrown around all leading to a groan of a time. It foreshadows the next reboot after only four years since the last.

But, Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 does deliver on some interesting visuals. There are some funny visual gags and the various characters looking a little beat down works quite well at times. At other times the comic feels a bit more comedic in its style than “metal,” and especially not “death metal.” Jonathan Glapion inks, FCO Plascencia‘s colors, and Tom Napolitano‘s lettering helps bring the visuals together in some of the more interesting aspects of the comic.

After the rocket launch of a first issue, Dark Nights: Death Metal #2 doesn’t feel as much “death metal” as it does a corporate suburbanite throwing on their leather jacket with some spikes and going to a show in the back. It never quite commits to the chaos of the mosh-pit but just kind of safely stands in the back admiring the musicianship, never committing to the gut experience. The comic in the end feels like two friends coming up with crazy ideas and throwing it all in a comic. Some times it works. Some times it doesn’t. But, it definitely keeps you on your toes.

Story: Scott Snyder Art: Greg Capullo
Ink: Jonathan Glapion Color: FCO Plascencia Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Dark Nights: Death Metal Rocks a Music Video Trailer

Get ready for the earth-shattering encore! The legendary team behind Dark Nights: Metal and Batman: Last Knight on Earth take center stage and reunite for one last tour. When the Earth is enveloped by the Dark Multiverse, the Justice League is at the mercy of the Batman Who Laughs. Humanity struggles to survive in a hellish landscape twisted beyond recognition, while Batman, Wonder Woman, and Superman have all been separated and fight to survive. Unleash the beast and let the head banging begin!

You can read Dark Nights: Death Metal#1 now.

The Robin King’s Reign Begins in Dark Nights: Death Metal #2!

Don’t miss the second chapter of the wildest ride in the DC universe, hitting shelves on July 14 from the epic team of Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion, and FCO Plascencia!

Nothing in the debut chapter of this summer’s biggest, boldest event comic compares to the quiet, chilling beginning to the Robin King’s reign! Debuting in Dark Nights: Death Metal #2, once a mere groblin but destined to be so much more (*read Dark Nights: Metal for more about the Batman Who Laughs’ crowing little robin goblins), the Robin King is one of Scott Snyder’s most frightening creations!

What the Robin King whispers in response to his invitation to ascend beyond groblinhood will haunt you! Dark Nights: Death Metal #2written by Scott Snyder with art by Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion and FCO Plascencia, hits shelves onJuly 14.

Swamp Thing, Wonder Woman and The Flash Meet the Justice Society of America in Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2

written by Scott Snyder
art by Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion and FCO Plascencia
card stock foil cover by Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion and FCO Plascencia
Aquaman variant cover by David Finch
Lobo variant cover by Jerome Opeña
Harley Quinn variant cover by Stanley “Artgerm” Lau
1:25 variant cover by Doug Mahnke
1:100 black and white variant cover by Greg Capullo and Jonathan Glapion
ON SALE 07.14.20

Get ready to scream…with excitement! More mysteries of the Dark Multiverse will be revealed in July’s Dark Nights: Death Metal #2! Along with a hallmark Jay Garrick and Wally West reunion, Wonder Woman and Swamp Thing will roar across the horrifying Dark Multiverse landscape alongside Batman, Jonah Hex and Harley Quinn! Can the remaining survivors of Perpetua’s grand design stand each other long enough to form a plan and take back the planet? Plus, what’s Lobo doing in space, who is the Robin King, and when will the Darkest Knight appear?

Don’t miss the second chapter of the wildest ride in the DC universe, hitting shelves on July 14 from the epic team of Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion and FCO Plascencia!

Dark Nights: Death Metal #2
« Older Entries