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Review: The Despicable Deadpool #300

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

It cannot be an easy thing to write a character for a long time and consistently come up with unique things, especially when it’s a superhero, but I am happy to say that Gerry Duggan did just that with Deadpool. Wade Wilson has always been a mouthy, hard to kill, merc who has given us stories that are dark but filled with humor, but Duggan took that to a new level with his run. From fighting Dead Presidents, the Uncanny Avengers, the Mercs for Money, to the original way Duggan told stories during Secret Empire, there was always something refreshing and new.

The Despicable Deadpool #300 continues the theme of super violent cartoons, which is basically an adult Looney Tunes (as I have said before adults can watch Looney Tunes too!). It marries violence with dark humor. It’s the jokes you cringe at sometimes, but still laugh. It’s like Family Guy, South Park, but in a comic book with basically an invincible superhero. So often superhero titles are filled with serious plots, and that is fine, and sure others have some humor, especially Marvel titles, but it leaves room for things like Harley Quinn and Deadpool. Titles like these go for the uber-silly, and all bets are off for breaking the fourth wall, and going into territory many of the other titles just can’t.

This comic brings a lot of the running themes and jokes in Duggan’s run to a close in what you can expect in this title. There’s plenty of gross, plenty of ridiculousness, plenty of violence, and plenty of comedy. Even if the jokes don’t always land, it almost seems intentional. Wade isn’t some top level stand up comic, he’s more like a hacky amateur at open mic night throwing out everything that is in his head. It’s also his coping mechanism, as this arc and issue show us Wade wishing to die, by putting a price on his own head. He’s a sad character, but he is also funny. This is reflective of many people we may know in pop culture, and in our own personal lives. These clowns that we watch perform for us, just trying to make us and themselves laugh, while dealing with real pain.

You can’t do a comic book without art, and this oversized issue gives us quite a bit of great varying style pencils Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne. The first part of the book deals with the gross, but it still found a way to make me laugh. The way many Marvel characters we know and love show up to deal with Deadpool, but for reasons I wont spoil, vomit all over the place, was creative, and so stupid in that perfect Deadpool way. Miss Marvel’s cheeks growing to a massive size has to be the highlight. The panel work showing all of it was creative and funny. The car chase sequence was also awesome, and quite classic Deadpool. This part of the book was the most traditional for the series, with it bringing a more cartoon style, which fit the action perfectly. For the final sequence, we get some really off the wall sequences as we prepare to wrap the issue up. There’s some really fantastic panel work here as well, showing Wade hook an IV up for himself, all inside of little panels while you see the main “shot” taking up the full page below the panels.

The inks by Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne are all as equally varied as the pencils. Each section of the book (which the art is cut into a section by three artists) gives us sharp lines, great shadows, and good depth to our characters. Much like the pencils and colors, there is a lot of inking done in this oversized issue, and the quality never dips. The colors by Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond, and Jordie Bellaire all range from a more muted tone approach in the first section of the book, where we see everyone vomiting orange and yellow, and as gross as this scene intentionally is, the colors work to not make it as gross as it could have been. The next section gives the brighter colored cartoon approach as I mentioned earlier, and gives us brighter reds, blues, and makes the superhero costumes we know and love pop. In the final section, it is more muted tones again, and gives us a nice colored pencil look to the artwork. The hell sequence in particular is awesome and the fire looks like it could come off of the page.

I would recommend this book to Deadpool fans old and new, and there’s really something special for you if you’ve followed this run. But even if you haven’t, and you want something so dumb, but in a good way, this is the comic for you. Deadpool is about taking your brain off and having a blast, and every once in awhile it gives you a touching moment, but after that, it may give you a fart joke, and I love it for that. Congratulations to all of the talented writers and artists that worked on this run and helped make it so fun and interesting. Now let’s see what the next run brings us for the Merc with the Mouth!

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli & Mike Hawthorne Inks: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, Terry Pallot, Craig Young & Mike Hawthorne Colors: Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond & Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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