Tag Archives: terry pallot

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man: Red Goblin

The Amazing Spider-Man: Red Goblin collects the end of writer Dan Slott‘s run on Spider-Man and features the showdown between Spider-Man and Red Goblin!

The collection features Amazing Spider-Man #794-801

Story: Dan Slott, Christos Gage
Art: Stuart Immonen, Mike Hawthorne, Nick Bradshaw, Humberto Ramos, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Marcos Martin
Ink: Wade Von Grawbadger, Terry Pallot, Cam Smith, Nick Bradshaw, Victor Olazaba, Cam Smith, Marcos Martin
Color: Marte Gracia, Erick Arciniega, Edgar Delgado, Java Tartaglia, Muntsa Vincente
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on November 12! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon Hardcover
Amazon Paperback
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Review: Weapon H Vol. 1 AWOL

The Weapon X Program has a new creation. Take a little bit of Wolverine, some Hulk, and a few other things, and you’ve got Weapon H! Yes, the concept is out there but the first trade, collecting the first six issues, is fun!

Weapon H Vol. 1 AWOL is by Greg Pak, Cory Smith, Marcus To, Aro Anindito, Terry Pallot, Keith Champaign, Scott Hanna, Walden Wong, Roberto Poggi, Morry Hollowell, Rachelle Rosenberg, Chris Sotomayor, Joe Caramagna, and Clayton Cowles.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores November 13. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Venom Adventures

With Venom soon in theaters, Marvel has been releasing numerous trades and comics starring the character for fans to devour. We’re going over some of what you can get including Venom Adventures!

The pocket sized digest collects Marvel Adventures Spider-Man #21, #24, and #35, and Marvel Universe Ultimate Spider-Man #16 and #19 by Fred Van Lente, Michael O’Hare, Cory Hamscher, Guru-eFX, Terry Pallot, Dave Sharpe, and Joe Caramagna.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2

Out now is The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2 which collects issues #17-31 and Annual #1-2, the adventures of Doc Ock in the body of Peter Parker!

The Superior Spider-Man The Complete Collection Vol. 2 is by Dan Slott, Ryan Stegman, Livesay, Edgar Delgado, Chris Eliopoulos, Jason Howard, Humberto Ramons, Javier Rodriguez, Marcos Martin, Victor Olazaba, Alvaro Lopez, Giuseppe Camuncoli, John Dell, Antonio Fabela, Terry Pallot, Alvaro Lopez, J.G. Jones, Laura Martin, Christos Gage, Will Sliney, Philip Briones, Clayton Cowles, Mike Del Mundo, Ellie Pule, Stephen Wacker, and Nick Lowe.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Infinity Countdown

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Infinity Countdown!

Infinity Countdown collects Infinity Countdown Prime #1, Infinity Countdown #1-5, Infinity Countdown: Adam Warlock #1, and some of Free Comic Book Day 2018 by Gerry Duggan, Michael Allred, Laura Allred, Mike Deodato, Jr., Frank Martin, Aaron Kuder, Jordie Bellaire, Nick Bradshaw, Morry Hollowell, Mike Hawthorne, Terry Pallot, Jose Marzan, Jr., and Jordie Bellaire.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Infinity Countdown #4

Ultron has long wished to take over all there is and replace it with only Ultron…but now armed with an Infinity Stone, he has never been closer to his goal. With the Guardians falling apart, who can step forward to stop the singularity from overwhelming everything?

Written by Gerry Duggan with art by Aaron Kuder and Mike Hawthorne, Infinity Countdown is a story I should be enjoying more than I do. I remember reading the classic “Infinity” stories like Gauntlet, War, and Crusade. This was during my prime reading experience so I’ve generally been looking forward to, and enjoying, the emphasis on Marvel’s cosmic corner.

The story is two parts with the Guardians and Nova Corps figuring out what to do with the Infinity Stone in their possession and the other focused on Silver Surfer and Adam Warlock fighting Ultron.

There’s some good aspects here but then things go sideways like Drax playing a sax (previous itterations of the character are much better) or Silver Surfer calling upon Galactus to help defeat Ultron. The Galactus feels like it has the entire job to undo changes to the character (I’m not even going to go in to the choice to give personality to the force of nature). The good aspects are some of the twists. There’s one involving a stone and another involving Silver Surfer. The epic aspect is almost there but the event never quite commits. In short, there’s better been done before and this new chapter falls short of what it’s built off of (give me Annhilation over this).

The art is another issue. The style is reminiscent of Mike Allred which may work for the Silver Surfer series but here it doesn’t quite match the story. These are some serious battles and destruction but the art style along with the coloring and inks gives it a look that doesn’t match the tone. There’s some great page layouts but it doesn’t click. The closest it does is a double page spread involving Galactus but even there the close up of Ultron looks like color pencils with some decent detail.

Something isn’t clicking here for me. Maybe it’s the story. Maybe it’s the art. The combination, absolutely. There’s glimpses of excellence but that’s mired in choices that don’t quite work. The fact we know more is to come this summer makes all of this feel even more like a prequel book, an early chapter that is dragging things out a bit too much.

Story: Gerry Duggan Art: Aaron Kuder, Mike Hawthorne
Ink: Aaron Kunder, Terry Pallot, Jose Marzan, Jr.
Color: Jordie Bellaire Lettering: VC’s Cory Petit

Story: 6.75 Art: 6.5 Overall: 6.65 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #300

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

It cannot be an easy thing to write a character for a long time and consistently come up with unique things, especially when it’s a superhero, but I am happy to say that Gerry Duggan did just that with Deadpool. Wade Wilson has always been a mouthy, hard to kill, merc who has given us stories that are dark but filled with humor, but Duggan took that to a new level with his run. From fighting Dead Presidents, the Uncanny Avengers, the Mercs for Money, to the original way Duggan told stories during Secret Empire, there was always something refreshing and new.

The Despicable Deadpool #300 continues the theme of super violent cartoons, which is basically an adult Looney Tunes (as I have said before adults can watch Looney Tunes too!). It marries violence with dark humor. It’s the jokes you cringe at sometimes, but still laugh. It’s like Family Guy, South Park, but in a comic book with basically an invincible superhero. So often superhero titles are filled with serious plots, and that is fine, and sure others have some humor, especially Marvel titles, but it leaves room for things like Harley Quinn and Deadpool. Titles like these go for the uber-silly, and all bets are off for breaking the fourth wall, and going into territory many of the other titles just can’t.

This comic brings a lot of the running themes and jokes in Duggan’s run to a close in what you can expect in this title. There’s plenty of gross, plenty of ridiculousness, plenty of violence, and plenty of comedy. Even if the jokes don’t always land, it almost seems intentional. Wade isn’t some top level stand up comic, he’s more like a hacky amateur at open mic night throwing out everything that is in his head. It’s also his coping mechanism, as this arc and issue show us Wade wishing to die, by putting a price on his own head. He’s a sad character, but he is also funny. This is reflective of many people we may know in pop culture, and in our own personal lives. These clowns that we watch perform for us, just trying to make us and themselves laugh, while dealing with real pain.

You can’t do a comic book without art, and this oversized issue gives us quite a bit of great varying style pencils Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne. The first part of the book deals with the gross, but it still found a way to make me laugh. The way many Marvel characters we know and love show up to deal with Deadpool, but for reasons I wont spoil, vomit all over the place, was creative, and so stupid in that perfect Deadpool way. Miss Marvel’s cheeks growing to a massive size has to be the highlight. The panel work showing all of it was creative and funny. The car chase sequence was also awesome, and quite classic Deadpool. This part of the book was the most traditional for the series, with it bringing a more cartoon style, which fit the action perfectly. For the final sequence, we get some really off the wall sequences as we prepare to wrap the issue up. There’s some really fantastic panel work here as well, showing Wade hook an IV up for himself, all inside of little panels while you see the main “shot” taking up the full page below the panels.

The inks by Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, and Mike Hawthorne are all as equally varied as the pencils. Each section of the book (which the art is cut into a section by three artists) gives us sharp lines, great shadows, and good depth to our characters. Much like the pencils and colors, there is a lot of inking done in this oversized issue, and the quality never dips. The colors by Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond, and Jordie Bellaire all range from a more muted tone approach in the first section of the book, where we see everyone vomiting orange and yellow, and as gross as this scene intentionally is, the colors work to not make it as gross as it could have been. The next section gives the brighter colored cartoon approach as I mentioned earlier, and gives us brighter reds, blues, and makes the superhero costumes we know and love pop. In the final section, it is more muted tones again, and gives us a nice colored pencil look to the artwork. The hell sequence in particular is awesome and the fire looks like it could come off of the page.

I would recommend this book to Deadpool fans old and new, and there’s really something special for you if you’ve followed this run. But even if you haven’t, and you want something so dumb, but in a good way, this is the comic for you. Deadpool is about taking your brain off and having a blast, and every once in awhile it gives you a touching moment, but after that, it may give you a fart joke, and I love it for that. Congratulations to all of the talented writers and artists that worked on this run and helped make it so fun and interesting. Now let’s see what the next run brings us for the Merc with the Mouth!

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli & Mike Hawthorne Inks: Scott Koblish, Matteo Lolli, Terry Pallot, Craig Young & Mike Hawthorne Colors: Nick Filardi, Ruth Redmond & Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #299

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**POSSIBLE SPOILERS BELOW**

We have one more issue of Gerry Duggan on Deadpool, and it is bittersweet for me. I love what he has done with the character, even at times making him a full on hero with the other book he wrote for awhile, The Uncanny Avengers. He has been a part of The Unity Squad, worked for Hydra-Cap or as Wade refers to him, Stevil Rogers during Secret Empire, and even had another classic battle with his friend and foe, Cable. Duggan has brilliantly kept Wade a hilarious character, but wasn’t afraid to show the darkness in him too.

Deadpool is similar to Spider-Man in that he jokes, even when he may feel uncomfortable. The difference is, Wade is a far darker and more tragic character. Peter Parker is hiding his identity, so he wears a mask. Wade is hiding his horribly scarred face, so that’s why he wears one. He was a lab experiment, and has massive amounts of PTSD, but he just jokes about everything, because life has become a joke to him. However, in this run, he finally had some people that he cared about. He had people he trusted. Now don’t get me wrong, Deadpool didn’t all of a sudden become a saint. He still ran the Mercs For Money, and ripped all of his fellow conmen off, leading them to want to join in on the fun of killing him that many other villains, and now SHIELD agents share.

In The Despicable Deadpool #299, we continue to see Wade double down on his ridiculous plan. He has put out a hit on himself, and many villains, and his former mercs, and some others who he wronged, are out to collect the reward. Again, this is a great joke, but it is also very tragic. Wade wants to die. There’s a part of him who has become a joke because his life has fallen apart. Again, and again, and this time he really seemed to try hard to be as good as he could, and for awhile he was an actual hero. Now he has returned to the why bother anti-hero mentality, but with a bigger disregard for his life than he’s had in recent years. I am not saying Deadpool is Shakespeare, but there is an element to it that reflects those kind of tragedies. There’s just more vulgar jokes mixed in.

The artwork consists of Mike Hawthorne on pencils, Terry Pallot on inks, and Jordie Bellaire on colors, and they give a style you can expect from a Deadpool book. It’s cartoonish, which fits the ridiculous nature of the comic, but also has a hint of a realistic look to it. Sure, all comic books may apply to these styles in some way shape or form, but Deadpool is the perfect comic to walk that line between the over the top style of cartoon violence in something like Looney Tunes and an R-rated action film like John Wick. It’s always been the way the Deadpool books have been drawn, and this title stays to that consistency, and that is a good thing.

I recommend this title for anyone who wants not only a light, fun read that is adult in nature, but also anyone who wants to see how this great run by Duggan and company will come to a close. The next issue is super sized, and this one mostly dealt with a lot of set up. There’s a bunch of pieces in play from throughout Duggan’s plots that are all going to come to what I imagine will be a ridiculous, and awesome head in Deadpool #300. This is going to be a blast, especially with Deadpool 2 hitting theaters soon.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Mike Hawthorne
Inks: Terry Pallot Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #298

F6B941B0-6E78-4459-9135-97409830283DReading Deadpool can feel like a darker, more adult version of Looney Tunes. If you took Wile Coyote, Bugs Bunny, and made them swear more, you’d basically have the Merc with the Mouth. The Despicable Deadpool #298 continues those over the top cartoon moments in a big way, and this title is going to miss Gerry Dugan writing it. The next run of the book is bringing on Skottie Young, who while he may be more known for his art, is no stranger to wacky over the top tales with his own I Hate Fairyland. That being said, I am still sad that Duggan is done in a few issues.

As a series, Deadpool usually doesn’t pretend to portray a kind, caring, or compassionate hero like we usually get with our heroes in Marvel Comics. Sure, he had a moment in this run and when he was on The Uncanny Avengers and aspiring to be better, since he looked up to Steve Rogers so much, but that was short lived. After the events of Secret Empire, and Hydra-Cap tricking Wade to do horrible things, Deadpool has given up the hero idea. Not only has he lost people, and killed people that he regrets killing, Deadpool now also has a bounty on him. This issue brings some great villains like The Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye, who are all out to get the $20 million reward on Deadpool’s head.

The pencils by Mike Hawthorne are great throughout the book. He keeps everything moving at a fast and funny pace with non-stop action as Deadpool tries to fight off the villains who are trying to collect the bounty. Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye all look fantastic, and so does Wade. The style by Hawthorne walks the line between realism and cartoonish. It balances the ridiculousness of a cartoon style story perfectly with the real world setting, and it works perfectly for a Deadpool book. Jordie Bellaire on colors and Terry Pallot on inks bring the pencils to life. The combination of the three of them really make the artwork standout on the book, and give even more humor to an already funny book. A Deadpool comic has to have funny moments in the artwork, and not just the words alone, and this issue is no different.

If you like Deadpool comics, you will be right at home with this issue. It’s silly comfort food, much like cartoons. Sometimes this book makes me laugh, sometimes it makes me surprised, but it always makes me smile. I don’t need to think of multiverses, or timelines, or anything deep, and while those things are wonderful in other titles, I love that Deadpool is simply unapologetic. You know what you’re getting most of the time in this series, and that’s okay.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Mike Hawthorne
Inks: Terry Pallot Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn

Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Despicable Deadpool #297

Despicable Deadpool #297

Story: Gerry Duggan Art: Mike Hawthorne
Ink: Terry Pallot Color: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: VC’s Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne, Nathan Fairbarn
Editor: Jordan D. White Assistant Editor: Annalise Bissa
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Mar 28, 2018
SRP: $3.99

THE MARVEL UNIVERSE KILLS DEADPOOL!
• Wade is no stranger to gambling with his life…but this time the odds are longer than the bathroom line at a burrito joint with a broken freezer.
• What do you do when half the world wants you dead?
• Start pissing off the OTHER half!

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