Tag Archives: deadpool

Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films. Brings in Over $5 billion

It doesn’t look like Doctor Strange has earned any more money since last week’s report so with that, I’m calling the 2016 comic movie run complete. Now, that means we can do a final look at 2016 and how the year compare’s to years past before moving on to 2017 next week!

Winners

  • Captain America: Civil War ruled the year earning $1.15 billion to be the top grossing film of 2016. That’s the highest grossing Captain America film so far.
  • Deadpool was one of the must successful films of the year earning $783 million it had a 13.5 multiplier for its budget. With a budget of just $58 million, the film shows you don’t need to spend a lot of money to find success.

Mixed

  • DC Comics films – For as much shit thrown at Batman v Superman and Suicide Squad, the films earned $873 million and $745 million and beat the average Marvel film at the domestic box office. Those are impressive numbers they just didn’t meet random expectations. Still, mixed reviews clearly didn’t sink these films. Where DC/Warner Bros. needs to work is at the foreign box office where their films lag Marvel’s. Boost earnings there and it’s a whole new ball game.
  • Doctor Strange – The film earned $232.6 million domestically and $444.9 internationally, both are well below Marvel’s averages. But, when you take out the universe’s billion dollar films and look at other debuts, this movie was right where you’d expect.

Losers

  • X-Men: Apocalypse – The film was a dud domestically earning $155 million and 71.42% of its earnings coming from the international box office. It earned $200 million less than X-Men: Days of Future Past. While a lot did come in, this film definitely placed the franchise on shakier ground. When Deadpool crushed this film with 1/3 the budget, it’s time to rethink the X franchise.
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows – The film earned half of what 2014’s film earned and didn’t even cross $100 million domestically. Adjusting for inflation this film was the second worst film when it comes to domestic earnings.

How does 2016 compare to previous years?

2016 saw more than $5 billion dollars in earnings for the 8 comic adaptations that were released, the most money ever earned. That beats 2012 which saw $4.1 billion. But, what’s interesting is that record was driven by domestic earnings which saw a record $1.9 billion. Internationally, the year was the second highest earnings of $3.1 billion. The record was $3.2 billion in 2014.

You can see from below how much the adaptation of comic films has exploded in recent years, not just in the volume, but also how much money is being earned.

We’ll have a deeper examination of the year that was in an upcoming article.

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Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films

The summer movie season is over and we’ve seen an interesting year when it comes to comic book films. For months debates have raged as to who is more successful, Marvel or DC, which movies were successes, and which were flops. The answers aren’t so simple and black and white, which is why I like to turn to data to give actual rankings as to who were winners and losers.

So far this year, seven films have been released based on comic books (counting Batman: The Killing Joke). This feature will focus on the 2016 releases until all the dollars are in, then I’ve got something special planned as we shift focus to 2017.

Of note:

  • Doctor Strange is slowing down but still bringing in international dollars, a few thousand this past week. The film has earned $677.6 million worldwide so far and will probably stop somewhere shy of $678. That puts the film at 18th of all time for comic films and right in the middle of the pack for 2016’s releases. It’s a bit mixed when it comes to Marvel films as it was below the average domestic, international, and worldwide totals, but that’s largely due to 4 films skewing things and making it a high hurdle. Compared to other “debut” films for characters, this one did about as expected.
  • Captain America: Civil War looks to be the top grossing film worldwide for 2016 though Rogue One is challenging that. The film earned $1.153 billion worldwide, about $98 million more than the next film. There’s still a chance that Rogue One catches up, but it’s unlikely to happen with $98 million to go and that film’s run winding down. Rogue One did pass the film when it comes to domestic earnings and is the top domestic film of the year. Civil War is third for the year, the best performing comic film.
  • Officer Downe continues to look like it hasn’t earned any more money. When it comes to the below stats, the film is being treated like Batman: The Killing Joke. The film is mostly a video on demand release, so it likely won’t see a wide release.
  • The Chair is currently not included in these stats. While the film is based on a comic, its release was done so through a service where receipts aren’t tracked in traditional ways.
  • DC’s films average $315.5 million a film domestically compared to Marvel’s $302.5 million. Internationally, Marvel earns $477.2 million and DC earns $446.8 million.

Here’s where this year’s movie crop stands as far as the actual numbers. Numbers are presented with and without The Killing Joke and Officer Downe which did not have an international run or wide release, so was not included in that average to start:

Total Domestic Gross: $1.901 billion ($1.897 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total International Gross: $3.126 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.026 billion ($5.022 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total Reported Budgets: $1.215 billion ($1.211 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total “Profit”: $3.812 billion ($3.811 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Average Domestic Gross: $271.0 million ($211.2 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average International Gross: $446.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $717.5 million ($558.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Budget: $173 million ($151.8 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Profit: $544.5 million ($476.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Now that we have those numbers down we can get a better idea as to how films have actually done this year. Below are various rankings of where films stand so far and if the films are above average (green), below average (red), or above the overall average but below the adjusted average (yellow):

Preview: Deadpool #29

Deadpool #29

(W) Gerry Duggan (A) Salva Espin (CA) Reilly Brown
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Apr 19, 2017
SRP: $3.99

‘TIL DEATH DO US… Part 6 (of 6)

Is this the end of Deadpool’s marriage?

X-Men Trading Card Variants this July

You read that right! Yes, X-Men Trading Cards. As a team comprised of some of the most fan-favorite mutants ever assembled join forces in the pages of July’s Astonishing X-Men #1, Marvel is bringing the fanfare and returning to one of the most iconic pieces of X-Men history by one of its most famed artists! To celebrate the launch of this must-read new series, Marvel’s Merry Mutants take your comic shop by storm throughout the month of July for a series of nearly thirty X-Men Trading Card Variants by legendary artist Jim Lee!

Remastered and recolored from the original trading cards, relive this iconic era of the Children of the Atom with a series of eye-popping covers. Originally penciled by legendary X-Men artist Jim Lee with inker Scott Williams, colorists such as Jesus Aburtov, Israel Silva & Chris Sotomayor apply modern coloring techniques to these classic masterpieces!

Look for these can’t-miss X-Men Trading Card Variants on your favorite Marvel titles, coming exclusively to comic shops throughout the month of July:

  1. ALL-NEW WOLVERINE #22 (Archangel)
  2. AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #30 (Bishop)
  3. AVENGERS #9 (Mystique)
  4. BLACK PANTHER #16 (Storm)
  5. CABLE #3 (Cable)
  6. CAPTAIN AMERICA: STEVE ROGERS #19 (Gambit)
  7. CHAMPIONS #10 (Cyclops)
  8. DAREDEVIL #23 (Domino)
  9. DEADPOOL #33 (Deadpool)
  10. DEFENDERS #3 (Shadow King)
  11. DOCTOR STRANGE #23 (Mr. Sinister)
  12. GENERATION X #4 (Jubilee)
  13. GWENPOOL, THE UNBELIEVABLE #18 (White Queen)
  14. INVINCIBLE IRON MAN #9 (Colossus)
  15. IRON FIST #5 (Sabretooth)
  16. JEAN GREY #4 (Dark Phoenix)
  17. MIGHTY THOR #21 (Sentinel)
  18. MS. MARVEL #20 (Lady Deathstrike)
  19. OLD MAN LOGAN #26 (Professor X)
  20. PETER PARKER: THE SPECTACULAR SPIDER-MAN #2 (Psylocke)
  21. THE PUNISHER #14 (Forge)
  22. ROYALS #5 (Magneto)
  23. SPIDER-MAN #18 (Shadowcat)
  24. THANOS #9 (Strong Guy)
  25. UNCANNY AVENGERS #25 (Rogue)
  26. VENOM #152 (Polaris)
  27. WEAPON X #5 (Warpath)
  28. X-MEN BLUE #7 (Jean Grey)
  29. X-MEN GOLD #7 (Mojo)

Review: Deadpool vs Punisher #1

STL040027.jpg

Fred Van Lente has made it so that the phrase “Nanny knows Krav Maga” is permanently etched in my cool phrase mind bank and, I am grateful to have read that gem. This very special story pits two of my favorite antiheroes against each other in a way that actually makes sense and doesn’t feel like a cheap crossover gimmick. If you’ve ever wondered what would happen if Wade Wilson came across Frank Castle you’re about to get your answer in Deadpool vs. The Punisher and it’s not the team up that you were expecting. This is one of those issues that makes it really hard for me to keep my review spoiler free because it’s so damn good I want to share it with everyone.

Pere Perez ‘s artwork gives us some panels that showcase the fight scenes in a way that would make any 80’s gamer, or Hotline Miami fan, tingle with glee at the crossing of the streams of awesomeness. Ruth Redmond provides some bright colors during the daytime fight scenes and a nice pop of blood in the night time Castle bar fight scenes. This issue is not only expertly drawn but beautifully colored in a way that makes the images come to life and caused me to wish for the day that this issue would become a movie.

We get to start off with Castle running through the bad guys on his mission to find the money behind bad guys he’s after, we then slide into the merc with a mouth spending quality time with people he genuinely cares about. The set up is by the numbers on its face but, it’s also filled with nuance and realism making this issues set up a plausible story. There are some very well written scenes that build upon the groundwork laid in the early pages that showcase both Punisher & Deadpool’s strengths and weaknesses. It builds up the story as if it’s sharing cut scenes from Street Fighter and, the final page of this issue is laid out like the end of a level up stage in a video game battle.

Overall, Van Lente manages to keep both of the title characters in their truest form, giving us loads of action, blood and, pure adrenaline raising violence. In round one of what I’m sure is going to be an epic arc, that ultimately ends with the two teaming up to take out the “real”  bad guys Tango & Cash style, the story comes to an abrupt and honest end. All of these amazing factors combine to form a perfect start to the arc, leaving me fully primed for round two because, Van Lente is telling one hell of a story and, I want more.

Story: Fred Van Lente Art: Pere Perez and Ruth Redmond
Story: 9.1 Art: 8.9 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films

The summer movie season is over and we’ve seen an interesting year when it comes to comic book films. For months debates have raged as to who is more successful, Marvel or DC, which movies were successes, and which were flops. The answers aren’t so simple and black and white, which is why I like to turn to data to give actual rankings as to who were winners and losers.

So far this year, seven films have been released based on comic books (counting Batman: The Killing Joke). This feature will focus on the 2016 releases until all the dollars are in, then I’ve got something special planned as we shift focus to 2017.

Of note:

  • Doctor Strange is slowing down but still bringing in international dollars, a few hundred this past week. The film has earned $677.6 million worldwide so far and will probably stop somewhere shy of $678. That puts the film at 18th of all time for comic films and right in the middle of the pack for 2016’s releases. It’s a bit mixed when it comes to Marvel films as it was below the average domestic, international, and worldwide totals, but that’s largely due to 4 films skewing things and making it a high hurdle. Compared to other “debut” films for characters, this one did about as expected.
  • Captain America: Civil War looks to be the top grossing film worldwide for 2016 though Rogue One is challenging that. The film earned $1.153 billion worldwide, about $98 million more than the next film. There’s still a chance that Rogue One catches up, but it’s unlikely to happen with $98 million to go and that film’s run winding down. Rogue One did pass the film when it comes to domestic earnings and is the top domestic film of the year. Civil War is third for the year, the best performing comic film.
  • Officer Downe continues to look like it hasn’t earned any more money. When it comes to the below stats, the film is being treated like Batman: The Killing Joke. The film is mostly a video on demand release, so it likely won’t see a wide release.
  • The Chair is currently not included in these stats. While the film is based on a comic, its release was done so through a service where receipts aren’t tracked in traditional ways.
  • DC’s films average $315.5 million a film domestically compared to Marvel’s $302.5 million. Internationally, Marvel earns $477.2 million and DC earns $446.8 million.

Here’s where this year’s movie crop stands as far as the actual numbers. Numbers are presented with and without The Killing Joke and Officer Downe which did not have an international run or wide release, so was not included in that average to start:

Total Domestic Gross: $1.901 billion ($1.897 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total International Gross: $3.126 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.026 billion ($5.022 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total Reported Budgets: $1.215 billion ($1.211 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total “Profit”: $3.812 billion ($3.811 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Average Domestic Gross: $271.0 million ($211.2 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average International Gross: $446.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $717.5 million ($558.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Budget: $173 million ($151.8 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Profit: $544.5 million ($476.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Now that we have those numbers down we can get a better idea as to how films have actually done this year. Below are various rankings of where films stand so far and if the films are above average (green), below average (red), or above the overall average but below the adjusted average (yellow):

Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films

The summer movie season is over and we’ve seen an interesting year when it comes to comic book films. For months debates have raged as to who is more successful, Marvel or DC, which movies were successes, and which were flops. The answers aren’t so simple and black and white, which is why I like to turn to data to give actual rankings as to who were winners and losers.

So far this year, seven films have been released based on comic books (counting Batman: The Killing Joke). This feature will focus on the 2016 releases until all the dollars are in, then I’ve got something special planned as we shift focus to 2017.

Of note:

  • Doctor Strange is slowing down but still bringing in international dollars. The film has earned $677.6 million worldwide so far and will probably stop somewhere shy of $678. That puts the film at 18th of all time for comic films and right in the middle of the pack for 2016’s releases. It’s a bit mixed when it comes to Marvel films as it was below the average domestic, international, and worldwide totals, but that’s largely due to 4 films skewing things and making it a high hurdle. Compared to other “debut” films for characters, this one did about as expected.
  • Captain America: Civil War looks to be the top grossing film worldwide for 2016 though Rogue One is challenging that. The film earned $1.153 billion worldwide, about $98 million more than the next film. There’s still a chance that Rogue One catches up, but it’s unlikely to happen with $98 million to go and that film’s run winding down. Rogue One did pass the film when it comes to domestic earnings and is the top domestic film of the year. Civil War is third for the year, the best performing comic film.
  • Officer Downe continues to look like it hasn’t earned any more money. When it comes to the below stats, the film is being treated like Batman: The Killing Joke. The film is mostly a video on demand release, so it likely won’t see a wide release.
  • The Chair is currently not included in these stats. While the film is based on a comic, its release was done so through a service where receipts aren’t tracked in traditional ways.
  • DC’s films average $315.5 million a film domestically compared to Marvel’s $302.5 million. Internationally, Marvel earns $477.2 million and DC earns $446.8 million.

Here’s where this year’s movie crop stands as far as the actual numbers. Numbers are presented with and without The Killing Joke and Officer Downe which did not have an international run or wide release, so was not included in that average to start:

Total Domestic Gross: $1.901 billion ($1.897 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total International Gross: $3.126 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.026 billion ($5.022 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total Reported Budgets: $1.215 billion ($1.211 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total “Profit”: $3.812 billion ($3.811 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Average Domestic Gross: $271.0 million ($211.2 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average International Gross: $446.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $717.5 million ($558.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Budget: $173 million ($151.8 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Profit: $544.5 million ($476.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Now that we have those numbers down we can get a better idea as to how films have actually done this year. Below are various rankings of where films stand so far and if the films are above average (green), below average (red), or above the overall average but below the adjusted average (yellow):

Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films

The summer movie season is over and we’ve seen an interesting year when it comes to comic book films. For months debates have raged as to who is more successful, Marvel or DC, which movies were successes, and which were flops. The answers aren’t so simple and black and white, which is why I like to turn to data to give actual rankings as to who were winners and losers.

So far this year, seven films have been released based on comic books (counting Batman: The Killing Joke). This feature will be weekly until the end of the year, as some films are still in the box-office and there’s till more to come.

Of note:

  • Doctor Strange looks like its worldwide total will be $677.6 million as it ramps down its run this past week. That puts the film at 18th of all time for comic films and right in the middle of the pack for 2016’s releases. It’s a bit mixed when it comes to Marvel films as it was below the average domestic, international, and worldwide totals, but that’s largely due to 4 films skewing things and making it a high hurdle. Compared to other “debut” films for characters, this one did about as expected.
  • Captain America: Civil War looks to be the top grossing film worldwide for 2016 though Rogue One is challenging that. The film earned $1.153 billion worldwide, about $98 million more than the next film. There’s still a chance that Rogue One catches up, but it’s unlikely to happen with $98 million to go and that film’s run winding down. Rogue One did pass the film when it comes to domestic earnings and is the top domestic film of the year. Civil War is third for the year, the best performing comic film.
  • Officer Downe continues to look like it hasn’t earned any more money. When it comes to the below stats, the film is being treated like Batman: The Killing Joke. The film is mostly a video on demand release, so it likely won’t see a wide release.
  • The Chair is currently not included in these stats. While the film is based on a comic, its release was done so through a service where receipts aren’t tracked in traditional ways.
  • DC’s films average $315.5 million a film domestically compared to Marvel’s $302.5 million. Internationally, Marvel earns $477.2 million and DC earns $446.8 million.

Here’s where this year’s movie crop stands as far as the actual numbers. Numbers are presented with and without The Killing Joke and Officer Downe which did not have an international run or wide release, so was not included in that average to start:

Total Domestic Gross: $1.901 billion ($1.897 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total International Gross: $3.126 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.026 billion ($5.023 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total Reported Budgets: $1.215 billion ($1.211 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total “Profit”: $3.812 billion ($3.811 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Average Domestic Gross: $271.0 million ($211.2 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average International Gross: $446.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $717.5 million ($558.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Budget: $173 million ($151.8 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Profit: $544.5 million ($476.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Now that we have those numbers down we can get a better idea as to how films have actually done this year. Below are various rankings of where films stand so far and if the films are above average (green), below average (red), or above the overall average but below the adjusted average (yellow):

Marvel Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Deadpool: Too Soon?

It’s Wednesday which means new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We’ve got a new volume from Marvel, Deadpool: Too Soon?.

Deadpool: Too Soon? collects issues 1 to 4 and material from Gwenpool Holiday Special: Merry Mix-Up #1 by Joshua Corin, Todd Nauck, Jim Charalampidis, Andy Troy, Chynna Clugston Flores, and Guy Major.

Find out about the trade and whether you should grab yourself a copy. You can find both in comic stores March 22 and bookstores April 4.

Get your copies now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Deadpool: Too Soon?
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Where the Data Ranks 2016’s Comic Book Films

The summer movie season is over and we’ve seen an interesting year when it comes to comic book films. For months debates have raged as to who is more successful, Marvel or DC, which movies were successes, and which were flops. The answers aren’t so simple and black and white, which is why I like to turn to data to give actual rankings as to who were winners and losers.

So far this year, seven films have been released based on comic books (counting Batman: The Killing Joke). This feature will be weekly until the end of the year, as some films are still in the box-office and there’s till more to come.

Of note:

  • Doctor Strange currently sits at $677.5 million. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 is $31 million ahead so it’s not likely to pass that film. It also will remain far behind Suicide Squad‘s $745.6 million worldwide total putting it in fifth for this year’s comic films.
  • Captain America: Civil War looks to be the top grossing film worldwide for 2016 though Rogue One is challenging that. The film earned $1.153 billion worldwide, about $100 million more than the next film. There’s still a chance that Rogue One catches up, but it’s unlikely to happen with $100 million to go. Rogue One did pass the film when it comes to domestic earnings and is the top domestic film of the year. Civil War is third for the year, the best performing comic film.
  • Officer Downe continues to look like it hasn’t earned any more money. When it comes to the below stats, the film is being treated like Batman: The Killing Joke. The film is mostly a video on demand release, so it likely won’t see a wide release.
  • The Chair is currently not included in these stats. While the film is based on a comic, its release was done so through a service where receipts aren’t tracked in traditional ways.
  • DC’s films average $315.5 million a film domestically compared to Marvel’s $302.5 million. Internationally, Marvel earns $477.2 million and DC earns $446.8 million.

Here’s where this year’s movie crop stands as far as the actual numbers. Numbers are presented with and without The Killing Joke and Officer Downe which did not have an international run or wide release, so was not included in that average to start:

Total Domestic Gross: $1.901 billion ($1.897 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total International Gross: $3.125 billion
Worldwide Gross: $5.026 billion ($5.022 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total Reported Budgets: $1.215 billion ($1.211 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Total “Profit”: $3.812 billion ($3.811 billion without Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Average Domestic Gross: $271.0 million ($211.2 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average International Gross: $446.5 million
Average: Worldwide Gross: $717.5 million ($558.4 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Budget: $173 million ($151.8 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)
Average Profit: $544.5 million ($476.5 million with Killing Joke and Officer Downe)

Now that we have those numbers down we can get a better idea as to how films have actually done this year. Below are various rankings of where films stand so far and if the films are above average (green), below average (red), or above the overall average but below the adjusted average (yellow):

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