Tag Archives: ruth redmond

Preview: Livewire Vol. 3 Champion

LIVEWIRE VOL. 3 CHAMPION (TPB)

Written by VITA AYALA
Art by TANA FORD, BRUNO OLIVERA
Colors by KELLY FITZPATRICK, RUTH REDMOND
Letters by SAIDA TEMOFONTE
Cover by RAÚL ALLÉN
On sale MAY 20 | 112 pages, full color | $14.99 US | T+
TRADE PAPERBACK | ISBN: 978-1-68215-354-3

What is the cost of freedom?

Wanted fugitive Livewire has been on the run for months from the authorities for shutting down the country’s power in an effort to protect people gifted with powers. Will a shocking offer to go public from a renowned local politician pull Livewire into a political spotlight?

Valiant’s breakout heroine fights to clear her name in the next electrifying volume from rising stars Vita Ayala (Prisoner X) and Tana Ford (Avengers)!

Collecting LIVEWIRE #9–12.

LIVEWIRE VOL. 3 CHAMPION (TPB)

Review: Quantum and Woody #3

Quantum and Woody #3

Quantum and Woody are back in high school – this time to solve a murder!
But are their combined powers a match for the haunts that await them? Find out in Quantum and Woody #3!

When I read this comic the first time verses the second time, a lot had changed. And it changed my appreciation of the comic, too. It went from being a fun diversion to a life raft.

Y’see, because my wife has lung issues, we’re effectively in quarantine already, and so I was in desperate need of a distraction. Even having read this book once, the second time through still allowed me to escape for just long enough to reset myself. So judging this book critically will be tough but then sometimes you just have to judge a book in the moment. And in this moment Quantum & Woody #3 was perfect.

Written by Christopher Hastings, with art by Ryan Browne and colors by Ruth Redmond, this book was everything I didn’t know I needed. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed it the first time I read it; this isn’t a comic that went from average to amazing simply because I read it after a tumultuous weekend.

Hastings has once again packed a full story, start middle and end, into a single comic. He has so far given us three complete stories in three issues that have all tied together with elements that are bound to come together in the finale next month whenever the fourth issue comes out. It isn’t often you get as much story in a comic as you have with Quantum & Woody #3 these days, which is a refreshing change of pace and it feels like you’re getting far more than you’re paying for in comparison to other books.

Browne’s art is absolutely perfect for this comic; there’s an energy to his line work that jumps from the page. Whether it’s Quantum punching somebody or Woody running out of a panel this comic has a lot to look at at, and Browne is able to make the art tell a complete story despite how much is happening between the covers. His art flows and makes sense. There’s no need to make a logic jump from panel to panel (you know how when you’re reading a comic and all of a sudden it feels like you missed a panel or two? That’s not here), which is a testament to Browne’s ability to tell a story visually.

Ruth Redmond has the unenviable job of coloring the insanity taking place in this comic, and does so in a way that nothing is lost on the page. Quantum & Woody #3 is a bright book because of Redmond’s vibrant colors as much as the story itself.

I also want to highlight Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou‘s lettering in this book. Hastings has a lot of words in this comic, and Otsmane-Elhaou’s work is so spot on to be almost unnoticeable. I say almost, because once I noticed his lettering because of the sound effects. I realized just how impressive the work is in this comic. Read the book, then read it again paying attention to the lettering and you’ll see what I mean; the font choices, the sizing and the sound effects are perfect for this book.

I don’t know when we’ll get to read the fourth issue at this point, and just typing that sucks. We’re all living in a time that few of us ever expected. Things have changed on us overnight. If you need a moment of brightness, a distraction from the news, then the third issue of this series is ideal for that.

It’s absolutely a perfect way to distract yourself. It’s a pretty stand alone book you can enjoy this without reading the first two issues. I’m going to be reading those three comics a lot over the coming months. Join me, won’t you?

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.2 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: X-O Manowar #1

X-O Manowar #1

Harvey Award-winning writer Dennis “Hopeless” Hallumand breakout star Emilio Laiso unleash Valiant’s most powerful protector in X-O Manowar #1!

Torn from the past and bonded with a living alien armor, will X-O Manowar become the hero the world needs now? As a futuristic force arises to destroy the planet, only this ancient warrior king has the courage to stand against impossible odds!

I have been waiting to read a finished version of X-O Manowar #1 for a long time. I got a chance to read an unfinished copy a month or two ago. Had I reviewed what I’d read then, it would have been glowing even with an unfinished product. The story stood out strongly even when the art was unfinished. Some pages were lacking color and I am sure that the lettering and dialogue have been tweaked here and there. I haven’t done a side by side comparison as yet and probably never will. This is all a long way of telling you that I knew I’d enjoy the comic before I read the final version.

Within the first three pages of this comic, Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum introduces new readers to Aric of Dacia, the 4th century warrior wearing an incredible suit of armour without throwing up exposition in his dialogue. There’s a natural relationship between Aric and the sacred armor of Shanhara born over years of interaction. Hallum injects a fresh and playful level of banter between the two. I love the new voice he has given Shanhara. I love how easily Hallum introduces his version of X-O Manowar to readers new and old.

Hallum takes X-O in a direction we have not yet seen in the modern era of X-O Manowar comics; Aric trying to fit in with regular people. And honestly, if the entire comic was just that, I’d still be as happy as a pig in muck. We’ve seen Aric go from a farmer to an emperor on a distant planet, try and find a home for hundred of time-displaced former slaves and fight against incredible odds, but we’ve never seen him try to play basketball. It’s one of those moments that I didn’t know I needed to see until I had seen it.

The comic has echoes of the Will Smith movie Hancock in Aric’s near clueless way of interacting with the modern world. His only guide is a sentient alien armor.

The story alone sold me on this book when I first read it. Being able to see the finished artwork of artist Emilio Laiso and colorist Ruth Redmond took this to another level.

The opening scenes set in space are beautiful. The colors are crisp, the line work clean, and so incredibly easy to follow despite the sheer amount of debris on the page. The pages immediately after the space sequence have a lot of text on them. Yet letterer Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou strikes a perfect balance between fitting the words on the page and allowing the artwork to shine and help tell the story.

Believe it or not, I’ve really only touched on the first half dozen pages or so of this book at the moment. I won’t delve much deeper into the specific events for spoiler reasons.

This is one of, if not the absolute best issues of X-O Manowar I have read in a long time. It’s also one of the best things from Valiant I’ve read in the last year. If you’re looking for a jumping-on spot for X-O Manowar, then this is going to be the best spot you’ll find without going back to 2012. Hallum, Laiso, Redmond, and Otsmane-Elhaou have created a masterpiece in X-O Manowar #1. It’s only gotten better with each subsequent reading.

Bring on the second issue.

Story: Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum Art: Emilio Laiso
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Quantum and Woody #3

QUANTUM AND WOODY #3

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Cover B by CASPAR WIJNGAARD
Cover C by WILL ROBSON
Pre-Order Edition Cover by STEVE LIEBER
Cover E 1/20 “Extra Virgin” Variant by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale MARCH 25 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Quantum & Woody are back in high school – this time to solve a murder!
But are their combined powers a match for the haunts that await them?

QUANTUM AND WOODY #3

Preview: X-O Manowar #1

X-O MANOWAR #1

Written by DENNIS “HOPELESS” HALLUM
Art by EMILIO LAISO
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by CHRISTIAN WARD
Cover B by JEFF DEKAL
Cover C by ROD REIS
Preorder Edition Cover by GREG SMALLWOOD
1:250 Bronze Variant Cover by RAÚL ALLÉN
Blank Cover Also Available
On sale MARCH 25 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Harvey Award-winning writer Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum (Star Wars: Darth Vader – Dark Visions) and breakout star Emilio Laiso (Marvel’s Spider-Man: Velocity) unleash Valiant’s most powerful protector!

Torn from the past and bonded with a living alien armor, will X-O Manowar become the hero the world needs now?

As a futuristic force arises to destroy the planet, only this ancient warrior king has the courage to stand against impossible odds!

Advanced Review: X-O Manowar #1

X-O Manowar #1

Harvey Award-winning writer Dennis “Hopeless” Hallumand breakout star Emilio Laiso unleash Valiant’s most powerful protector in X-O Manowar #1!

Torn from the past and bonded with a living alien armor, will X-O Manowar become the hero the world needs now? As a futuristic force arises to destroy the planet, only this ancient warrior king has the courage to stand against impossible odds!

I have been waiting to read a finished version of X-O Manowar #1 for a long time. I got a chance to read an unfinished copy a month or two ago. Had I reviewed what I’d read then, it would have been glowing even with an unfinished product. The story stood out strongly even when the art was unfinished. Some pages were lacking color and I am sure that the lettering and dialogue have been tweaked here and there. I haven’t done a side by side comparison as yet and probably never will. This is all a long way of telling you that I knew I’d enjoy the comic before I read the final version.

Within the first three pages of this comic, Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum introduces new readers to Aric of Dacia, the 4th century warrior wearing an incredible suit of armour without throwing up exposition in his dialogue. There’s a natural relationship between Aric and the sacred armor of Shanhara born over years of interaction. Hallum injects a fresh and playful level of banter between the two. I love the new voice he has given Shanhara. I love how easily Hallum introduces his version of X-O Manowar to readers new and old.

Hallum takes X-O in a direction we have not yet seen in the modern era of X-O Manowar comics; Aric trying to fit in with regular people. And honestly, if the entire comic was just that, I’d still be as happy as a pig in muck. We’ve seen Aric go from a farmer to an emperor on a distant planet, try and find a home for hundred of time-displaced former slaves and fight against incredible odds, but we’ve never seen him try to play basketball. It’s one of those moments that I didn’t know I needed to see until I had seen it.

The comic has echoes of the Will Smith movie Hancock in Aric’s near clueless way of interacting with the modern world. His only guide is a sentient alien armor.

The story alone sold me on this book when I first read it. Being able to see the finished artwork of artist Emilio Laiso and colorist Ruth Redmond took this to another level.

The opening scenes set in space are beautiful. The colors are crisp, the line work clean, and so incredibly easy to follow despite the sheer amount of debris on the page. The pages immediately after the space sequence have a lot of text on them. Yet letterer Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou strikes a perfect balance between fitting the words on the page and allowing the artwork to shine and help tell the story.

Believe it or not, I’ve really only touched on the first half dozen pages or so of this book at the moment. I won’t delve much deeper into the specific events for spoiler reasons.

This is one of, if not the absolute best issues of X-O Manowar I have read in a long time. It’s also one of the best things from Valiant I’ve read in the last year. If you’re looking for a jumping-on spot for X-O Manowar, then this is going to be the best spot you’ll find without going back to 2012. Hallum, Laiso, Redmond, and Otsmane-Elhaou have created a masterpiece in X-O Manowar #1. It’s only gotten better with each subsequent reading.

Bring on the second issue.

Story: Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum Art: Emilio Laiso
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

X-O Manowar #1 Sword Shanhara Variant Covers Revealed

X-O Manowar features exciting “Sword of Shanhara” 1:25 variant covers by all-star artists!

The debut issue by Harvey Award-winner Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum and breakout star artist Emilio Laiso goes on sale in just three weeks (March 25th), and it will feature a jaw-dropping 1:25 variant by Erica Henderson. Issues #2-#4 will have their own special “Sword of Shanhara” variants by Daniel Warren Johnson, Dustin Weaver, and Michael Walsh!

As if the artwork alone wasn’t amazing enough, special treatment will be applied to X-O Manowar’s energy sword on each cover to make it pop!

The X-O Manowar 1:25 “Sword of Shanhara” Variants are 1:25 covers, meaning comic shops will receive one with every qualifying order of 25 copies of X-O Manowar. If you want to add these phenomenal covers to your collection, contact your local comic shop and tell them you want the X-O Manowar “Sword of Shanhara” Variant Covers!

The blockbuster adventure begins in X-O Manowar #1 on March 25th, 2020, featuring colors by Ruth Redmond and letters by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou.

Feast your eyes on the stunning artwork below.

X-O MANOWAR #1 1:25 Cover by Erica Henderson
X-O MANOWAR #1 1:25 Cover by Erica Henderson
X-O MANOWAR #2 1:25 Cover by Daniel Warren Johnson
X-O MANOWAR #2 1:25 Cover by Daniel Warren Johnson
X-O MANOWAR #3 1:25 Cover by Dustin Weaver
X-O MANOWAR #3 1:25 Cover by Dustin Weaver
X-O MANOWAR #4 1:25 Cover by Michael Walsh
X-O MANOWAR #4 1:25 Cover by Michael Walsh

Review: Quantum and Woody #2

Quantum and Woody #2

The world’s worst superheroes unleash brand-new superpowers in Quantum and Woody #2! Can Woody’s new visions of the future be trusted when it leads the duo to face their arch-rival DOCTOR TOILET?!

(No, they most certainly cannot.)

Sometimes you read a comic that you’re expecting to be average because you’ve decided that you need to read everything that a certain publisher or series puts out. Over the years I’ve read almost every Valiant comic I could get my hands on. Some are far better than others. There are always the odd one or two that take me entirely by surprise. I hoped that I’d enjoy Christopher Hastings Quantum & Woody. I had no idea that with a single issue it’d take me by the ankles and rip the rug out from under me.

The first issue struck such a chord that I’ve been waiting for this issue for what feels like months and not weeks. Hastings, artist Ryan Browne, and colorist Ruth Redmond have been able to capture something that I’ve often missed in American comics. Quantum and Woody delivers a quintessentially British feeling. I’m aware that none of the creators are British. They’ve been able to capture the spirit of comics like weekly anthology comic 2000A.D. For me that’s a huge plus. I was always amazed at how much was crammed into the short space in the anthology’s stories, and the same is very true here.

Hastings has packed a full story, start middle and end, that could have easily been spread across multiple issues. Probably at least four to six if it was a bi-weekly comic from a certain dedicated company. Even so, the issue doesn’t feel like the story is being stretched thin. Which isn’t to say this comic is too packed; between Hasting’s writing and the art of Browne and Redmond this comic strikes the perfect balance.

Where the first issue reintroduced us to the brothers and their relationship this issue focuses on their attempt to become legitimate superheroes by attacking an ice dancer. It’s as glorious as it sounds. But this also gives us one of the best sequences in the series so far with Woody sliding through the panels which only adds to the chaos of the brothers and the ice dancer on the page. Visually, this is a great example of why comics are such a unique medium; Browne is able to turn what is essentially a sight gag into the border of the panels while highlighting the frantic pace of the page.

It’s a simple trick, but it’s impact cannot be denied. You simply can’t do this in any other medium.

I’ll make no apologies for the love-letter to Quantum & Woody #2 that this review has become. I frankly don’t care. This comic is utterly fantastic in every way. Genuinely gutted that we’re only getting four issues of this creative team at this point, but these four issues are on pace to be some of the best comics featuring the World’s Worst superheroes I’ve ever read.

Story: Christopher Hastings Art: Ryan Browne
Colors: Ruth Redmond Letters: Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou

Story: 9.2 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Valiant’s X-O Manowar Gets a Trailer

A 4th-Century Visigoth warrior-prince, Aric of Dacia was abducted and enslaved by aliens known as The Vine. Escaping their control, Aric bonded with the unique sentient armor Shanhara, becoming X-O Manowar — the most powerful weapon in the universe. Returning to Earth in the modern day, Aric and Shanhara use their incredible capabilities for the good of mankind, but mankind may have other intentions…

Written by Dennis “Hopeless” Hallum, with art by Emilio Laiso, colors by Ruth Redmond, and letters by Hassan Otsmane-Elhaou, X-O Manowar #1 is out on March 29, 2020.

Preview: Quantum and Woody #1

QUANTUM AND WOODY #2

Written by CHRISTOPHER HASTINGS
Art by RYAN BROWNE
Colors by RUTH REDMOND
Letters by HASSAN OTSMANE-ELHAOU
Cover A by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Cover B by JOE QUINONES
Cover C by REILLY BROWN
Pre-Order Edition Cover by TODD NAUCK
Cover E 1/20 “Extra Virgin” Variant by DAVID NAKAYAMA
On sale FEBRUARY 26 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

The world’s worst superheroes unleash brand-new superpowers!
But can Woody’s new visions of the future be trusted when it leads the duo to face their arch-rival DOCTOR TOILET?!
(No, they most certainly cannot.)

QUANTUM AND WOODY #2
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