General Marvel

Review: The Despicable Deadpool #298

F6B941B0-6E78-4459-9135-97409830283DReading Deadpool can feel like a darker, more adult version of Looney Tunes. If you took Wile Coyote, Bugs Bunny, and made them swear more, you’d basically have the Merc with the Mouth. The Despicable Deadpool #298 continues those over the top cartoon moments in a big way, and this title is going to miss Gerry Dugan writing it. The next run of the book is bringing on Skottie Young, who while he may be more known for his art, is no stranger to wacky over the top tales with his own I Hate Fairyland. That being said, I am still sad that Duggan is done in a few issues.

As a series, Deadpool usually doesn’t pretend to portray a kind, caring, or compassionate hero like we usually get with our heroes in Marvel Comics. Sure, he had a moment in this run and when he was on The Uncanny Avengers and aspiring to be better, since he looked up to Steve Rogers so much, but that was short lived. After the events of Secret Empire, and Hydra-Cap tricking Wade to do horrible things, Deadpool has given up the hero idea. Not only has he lost people, and killed people that he regrets killing, Deadpool now also has a bounty on him. This issue brings some great villains like The Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye, who are all out to get the $20 million reward on Deadpool’s head.

The pencils by Mike Hawthorne are great throughout the book. He keeps everything moving at a fast and funny pace with non-stop action as Deadpool tries to fight off the villains who are trying to collect the bounty. Juggernaut, Taskmaster, and Bullseye all look fantastic, and so does Wade. The style by Hawthorne walks the line between realism and cartoonish. It balances the ridiculousness of a cartoon style story perfectly with the real world setting, and it works perfectly for a Deadpool book. Jordie Bellaire on colors and Terry Pallot on inks bring the pencils to life. The combination of the three of them really make the artwork standout on the book, and give even more humor to an already funny book. A Deadpool comic has to have funny moments in the artwork, and not just the words alone, and this issue is no different.

If you like Deadpool comics, you will be right at home with this issue. It’s silly comfort food, much like cartoons. Sometimes this book makes me laugh, sometimes it makes me surprised, but it always makes me smile. I don’t need to think of multiverses, or timelines, or anything deep, and while those things are wonderful in other titles, I love that Deadpool is simply unapologetic. You know what you’re getting most of the time in this series, and that’s okay.

Story: Gerry Duggan Pencils: Mike Hawthorne
Inks: Terry Pallot Colors: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: Joe Sabino
Cover: Mike Hawthorne & Nathan Fairbairn

Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

General Marvel