Tag Archives: joe sabino

Exclusive Preview: Black Panther #15

Black Panther #15

(W) Ta-Nehisi Coates (A/CA) Daniel Acuñ (L) Joe Sabino
Rated T+
In Shops: Aug 28, 2019
SRP: $3.99

THE INTERGALACTIC EMPIRE OF WAKANDA – THE BLACK PANTHER RETURNS TO EARTH!

T’Challa secures a legendary victory against N’Jadaka and his Intergalactic Empire! At last, the king can return to his throne and the loved ones he left behind. But even at home, T’Challa isn’t free from the Empire’s long shadow…

Black Panther #15

Review: Absolute Carnage vs. Deadpool #1

Deadpool gets tied up and tangles with Carnage in Absolute Carnage vs. Deadpool #1. The latest entry into the “Absolute Carnage” event.

Story: Frank Tieri
Art: Marcelo Ferreira
Ink: Roberto Poggi
Color: Rachelle Rosenberg
Letterer: Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

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Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Review: Absolute Carnage vs Deadpool #1

Absolute Carnage vs. Deadpool #1

Two characters I generally dislike come together in Absolute Carnage vs Deadpool #1, an entry in the Absolute Carnage event. And even though the issue has a more comedic tone than the rest of the event’s horror, it still works and entertains. Yes, I enjoyed a comic with Deadpool and Carnage at the center of it.

Written by Frank Tieri, the issue sees Deadpool finally piss Spider-Man off enough that Spider-Man stops talking to him unless Deadpool seeks help. Off to Ravencroft Deadpool goes but unbeknownst to him, the place is the hideout for Carnage and his cult. For those that don’t know, Absolute Carnage has Carnage and his growing army attempting to get the spines of symbiote wearers to free their god. Up to this comic, the event has had a nice tinge of horror to it. Absolute Carnage vs Deadpool #1 takes a bit of a different route focusing more on Deadpool’s humor.

That humor extends to Carnage who comes off more as a laughable villain than the nightmare depicted in other issues. That’s not a bad thing but there’s absolutely a difference in tone in this comic versus all others. It makes this issue a bit of an outlier. That also makes it a breather in a rather serious and “scary” event.

What also works is Carnage and Deadpool themselves. They play off each other. With tones so diametrically opposed they somehow balance each other out and become tolerable to me.

The art by Marcelo Ferreira fits the tone of it all quite well. With ink by Robert Poggi and color by Rachelle Rosenberg the art is able to do both humor and horror. Compared to early parts of the comic, the tone of the art begins to shift as Deadpool enters the building of nightmares and continues to shift as things spin out of control. The lettering is key too. Joe Sabino nails it with a style that emphasizes the nature of Carnage and his followers.

While I’m not quite there to say you should go out and buy the comic, I do think the trade will be a lot of fun to read.

Story: Frank Tieri Art: Marcelo Ferreira
Ink: Roberto Poggi Color: Rachelle Rosenberg Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Valkyrie: Jane Foster #1

She was Thor but now Jane Foster has a new role as Valkyrie in Valkyrie: Jane Foster #1, a fantastic debut!

Story: Jason Aaron, Al Ewing
Art: Cafu
Letterer: Joe Sabino
Color: Jesus Arbutov

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle & comiXology

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: War of the Realms Omega #1

War of the Realms Omega #1

War of the Realms: Omega #1 is not so much a full epilogue story to the “War of the Realms” event as a tasting menu for the various spinoffs that come after it. Kudos to Marvel for putting these in their own comic instead of stepping on Jason Aaron, Russell Dauterman, and Matthew Wilson’s literal thunder as they hit the high point of Aaron’s Thor epic. With one last omniscient conversation between Daredevil and Heimdall as a framing narrative, Omega #1 tells the story of Jane Foster, Loki, and Punisher while setting up Jane Foster Valkyrie #1, Loki #1, and Punisher Kill Krew #1.

Even if it’s mostly just a conversation between Daredevil and Heimdall, the framing narrative of Omega #1 is a fantastic conclusion to Daredevil’s struggles with godhood that Jason Aaron penned in War Scrolls. It’s also reunion of one of my favorite recent Daredevil art teams of Ron Garney and Matt Milla, who transform the look of their framing narrative from fantasy to street level as Daredevil goes from talking about gods, prayers, and Valhalla to stopping a mugger with the help of some Yggdrasil forged fighting sticks. Aaron also brings up some interesting ideas like Daredevil’s guilt about his own faith and beliefs making him a good God of Fear that protected Midgard in their direst need. It connects to his recent writing of Thor that the best god isn’t one that fights for the mantle, but acknowledges the responsibility that is thrust upon him.

The first story in Omega #1 features Jane Foster and the Valkyries in a morgue where she hopes to help find them some peace and is written by Aaron and Al Ewing with art from Cafu and Jesus Aburtov. Jane interacts with Lisa, who used to date the superhero America Chavez, and they both can empathize on what it’s like to be connected to someone with so much power and be ordinary. It’s a nice human interaction before a beautiful transformation sequence where Jane takes on the responsibility of reopening Valhalla and finding rest for the Asgardians. Cafu’s art is clean and photorealistic, but not too stiff while Aburtov’s colors are bright, glossy, but a little sad. Jane played a major role in “War of the Realms”, and it’ll be nice to see her as headliner for a little bit in her own series that looks to continue to play on Aaron’s themes of faith and belief that he has explored throughout his Thor comics.

On the more mischievous side, there is a story starring Loki and his undersized Frost Giant buddy Drrf from Daniel Kibblesmith, Oscar Bazaldua, and David Curiel. As evidenced by his work on Valiant High, Lockjaw, and Deadpool vs. Black Panther, Kibblesmith excels at combining comics continuity with funny and genuinely heartfelt moments. And there are a few of those in this short story as Loki takes a young Frost Giant under his wing after he spots the little guy using a stew pot lid as a sled. Bazaldua’s cartoon-y style visuals are a good fit for this book and capture Loki’s every smirk and glint of mischief in his eye. He earned the role of king of Frost Giants by killing his father, but it will be difficult to keep the respect of this murderous and cannibalistic realm. However, adding Drrf to the equation keeps the tone of the story light and not super serious in a Game of Thrones kind of way.

The final Omega #1 short story is a Punisher one, from Gerry Duggan and the fantastic Juan Ferreyra that shows that the War of the Realms never really ended for one person: Frank Castle. Castle is barbecuing stray Helhounds with a flamethrower, breaking up Asgardian revelry with semi-automatic gun fire, and making sure the inhabitants of Midgard don’t loot in the post-War chaos. His mission of vengeance towards criminals has expanded from mortals to fantasy beings thanks to the losses suffered by the people, and especially the children of New York, during the War. However, the real star of the Punisher story isn’t the brooding revenge or monster becomes monster hunter narrative book, but Ferreyra’s art, which he colors himself and has a Steve Dillon meets Heavy Metal vibe. The combination of melodramatic dialogue and captions and over the top violence is a winner.

War of the Realms Omega #1 accomplished what it set out do, which is to pique my interest in the upcoming Jane Foster, Loki, and Punisher comic book series that are spinning out of the event. The artists for these books are especially well-cast, and Cafu’s beautiful take on Jane Foster’s transformation from mortal to Valkyrie was the highlight of this entire one-shot. Also, Juan Ferreyra is such an underrated artist, and I’m excited to see his take on creative fantasy monster executions.

Story: Jason Aaron, Al Ewing, Daniel Kibblesmith, Gerry Duggan
 Art: Ron Garney, Cafu, Oscar Bazaldua, Juan Ferreyra
 Colors: Matt Milla, Jesus Aburtov, David Curiel
Letters: Joe Sabino, Clayton Cowles, Cory Petit
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Wolverine: Exit Wounds #1

Classic Wolverine creators come back for this one-shot comic!

Story: Larry Hama, Chris Claremont, Sam Kieth
Art: Scot Eaton, Salvador Larroca, Sam Kieth
Color: Matt Milla, Val Staples, Ronda Pattison
Letters: Joe Sabino
Ink: Sean Parsons

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle & comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Black Panther #13

Black Panther #13 kicks off a brand new arc in Black Panther’s galactic adventure. “Two Thousand Seasons” starts here!

Story: Ta-Nehisi Coates
Art: Daniel Acuña
Letters: Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle & comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Major X #6

Major X #6

Major X #6 epitomizes everything I’ve disliked in this series amplified. The comic may go down as the worst comic of 2019 with a disjointed story, laughable dialogue, inconsistent art, and being generally non-sensical.

Written by Rob Liefeld, with art by Liefeld, the issue doesn’t even pick up where the last left off. In Major X #5, the final page revealed the identity of Major X’s mother, Storm. When Major X #6 starts, we’re straight into a battle with the aged Namor. There’s no follow up. No real discussion. Just another battle that comes out of nowhere. And even then, the battle makes little sense.

In between panels which are supposed to show off Liefeld’s artistic talents, we get characters taking moments from the battle for speeches or to talk to each other as if everything is paused. While Namor battles, his kids are nowhere to be seen until the final moments. There’s no explanation of much of anything… it’s just bad. Add in dialogue that’s cringe-worthy and its a mess, unlike anything I’ve read in quite some time.

Judging from the opening few pages, Liefeld thinks it might be good?

The comic opens with Deadpool talking to a mysterious someone about how he’s needed asking “what took you so long?” It feels like Liefeld talking to Marvel and the reader as if Major X would shake up the X-Universe. There’s little debate that Liefeld’s contributions have been major in the X-Universe. This latest venture is something different. It’s some decent ideas that don’t feel fleshed out or thought out. It’s notes on a page without a coherent narrative to bring it together. And this has been part of Liefeld’s contributions. While he created Deadpool, others added the depth. Same with Cable and so many others. He’s a concept creator with others needing to take it home. Here too we’ll see that… eventually.

You’d think Liefeld’s art would be able to salvage this mess but that’s far from the case. Characters lose detail, panels make no sense in context (standing around to chat in battle?), and just generally choppy transitions from panel to panel and pages to pages. There’s moments but nothing memorable.

The issue is bad capping off a miniseries that seemed to get worse at it went on. Liefeld, and the team, made a splash with this, just not in the right way. Now, hopefully history repeats and another creator picks up the ball and does something interesting going forward with what has been set up.

Story: Rob Liefeld Art: Rob Liefeld
Ink: Rob Leifeld, Cory Hamscher, Adelso Corona
Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letters: Joe Sabino
Story: 1.0 Art: 5.0 Overall: 2.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Major X #5

Major X #5

The rise of the X-Ential! And the full identity of Major X himself! Major X #5 is full of reveals and twists that by the end will leave your head spinning and utterly baffled as to what you just read.

Yes, I’ll admit it, I hate reading this series at this point. But even with a general dislike, I want to see where creator, and writer, Rob Liefeld will take each issue.

There are some great concepts here but the narrative at times is baffling, full of holes, and with plotting that’ll leave you wondering if you missed something. It’s borderline incoherent at times.

And really, none of the above really matters as fans of Liefeld, and the series will buy it anyways no matter the reviews. It’s pretty bulletproof like that (and there’s nothing wrong with it).

Major X, M’Koy, and X-Ential have lept through time to Genosha. In the wasteland of the nation, much is revealed, but not explained, about X-Ential and we meet a new character Aura. Nothing is explained about Aura. We just go with it. We get new age dialogue and we’re expected to roll with it as well. Aura somehow knows Major is “Major” but this should be the first time meeting. Then there’s a random battle and a reveal at the end which will get folks talking. I’m not even going to dive into the scene in Atlantis which feels like it belongs in an entirely different issue.

It’s all… bad. Really bad. In a more skilled writer’s hands what’s presented could work but as is it feels like a bunch of ideas on notes cards laid out on a table.

The art by Brent Peeples doesn’t help. With ink by Adelso Corona, color by Romulo Fajardo, Jr. and lettering by Joe Sabino, the art style and character designs are inconsistent. A prime example of this is in the depiction of Aura. At times the character looks like an adult. At other times she looks like a teenager. And at other times Aura looks like Sloth in The Goonies.

Major X #5 and the series as a whole feels like a throwback to the 1990s except this takes the excessively bad aspects of this period to the extreme. Choppy storytelling. Bad art. The comic features interesting concepts that aren’t explored or fleshed out enough.

At this point, I’m not even sure my 13-year-old self would have enjoyed this series.

Story: Rob Liefeld Art: Brent Peeples
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 4.0 Art: 6.5 Overall: 4.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Major X #4

Major X #4

There’s a point you hit at times where you need to step back and question why you’re reading a comic series. Major X #4 is that point. The issue is the epitome of what was wrong with the comics of the 90s. It features stilted dialogue, storytelling, and inconsistent art. For some, the issue will be fantastic capturing their youthful excitement. For others, you’ll see how far comics have come in 20 years.

Major X and M’Koy are captured by the mysterious Administrator. He’s the typical bad guy whose motivations and inclusions are thin. It truly feels like a throwback introducing characters and then figuring out their origin and reason for inclusion down the road. Look cool and ask questions later is the name of the game for Major X as a whole.

Rob Liefeld handles writing duties delivering dialogue that’s one quip after another. It forgoes a cohesive plot, instead focusing on choppy jumps from fight panel to fight panel. Characters are thrown around and introduced with little motivation other than “bad guy” and “revenge.” Major X #4 is a frustrating experience as Liefeld continues to show he’s a much better idea person than storyteller.

The art by Brent Peeples is decent. Adelso Corona handles inks with Romulo Fajardo, Jr. on color, and Joe Sabino lettering. The style very much feels like an homage to the 90s as well which Peeples has pulled off before. Here though, there’s inconsistency of character design and the habit of dropping detail in action scenes. Again, the poses, gun blasts, and action take precedence over the polished product.

Major X #4 isn’t for me and as the series drags on it’s clear I’ve moved on from this sort of storytelling. My 13 year old self would have loved this. My adult self just expects more.

Story: Rob Liefeld Art: Brent Peeples
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letterer: Joe Sabino
Story: 5.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 5.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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