Tag Archives: micah meyers

Exclusive Preview: Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

(W) Marco Lopez, Ivan Plaza
(A) Puis Calzada, Bryan Magnaye
(L) Micah Meyers
(CA) Puis Calzada, Rosa Colón
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“As the leader of The Ambassadors, Konnan has faced off against doomsday cults, alien invaders, rogue temporal thieves and civilizations at the center of the earth. Now, the organization faces its greatest mission: getting to the bottom of a seemingly unstoppable series of worldwide catastrophes of unknown origin. Ambassadors’ bases are being destroyed one by one by a new global criminal faction calling themselves the Knights of Draconis! Will this ruthless and cunning organization on the rise put an end to the Ambassadors and all that they protect?”

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konan & the Ambassadors #1

Review: Wyrd #1

Wyrd #1

There are problems, cases, too strange for US law enforcement to solve. Pitor Wyrd is the one who solves them-for a fee, of course. An unaging, invincible detective with a penchant for the strange, Wyrd is the one the government calls when things go very badly and very strange. 

This issue: Crimea. A failed attempt at recreating a certain US supersolider. A monster roaming the countryside. A trail of bodies.

Reading the description, I went into Wyrd #1 expecting a riff on the X-Files and after checking out the first issue, it’s much more John Constantine than anything else. That’s not a bad thing at all. Writer Curt Pires delivers an entertaining issue but at the same time it’s nothing that really feels unique, so far.

We learn a bit about Piotr Wyrd mostly through teasing and he’s a hard drinking individual who doesn’t seem to enjoy life and has made some decisions in the past he regrets. He’s Constantine. And so far, that’s the biggest issue. He’s a her we’ve seen before a few times and isn’t unique enough. Now, that might change over the next four issues but for the first, it’s enough to entertain.

The art by Antonio Fuso is some solid style with coloring by Stefano Simeone it combines to create a visually interesting start. There’s a lot of use of the art to tease us about Wyrd’s story. There’s a lot of show, don’t tell and that extends to the big bad at the end where we’re visually hinted as to what’s going on. The lettering by Micah Meyers is important too giving a bit more personality to the big bad as well. Without that right lettering, the villain would just feel like a roided out reject from the mutant gang in Dark Knight Returns.

There’s nothing bad about this first issue. There’s also, so far, nothing that makes it really stand out. The art is good and tells a lot of the story. The main character feels a bit derivative. The villain is nothing all that special and things wrap up rather quickly. The first issue feels like a bit more of a teaser as to what’s to come than a story itself. Not enough unique to really get into what’s presented.

Story: Curt Pires Art: Antonio Fuso
Color: Stefano Simeone Lettering: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for reviews

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Hellicious #2

Well that was an awkward meeting but hey, Cherry scared Briggy Bundy! Actually she may have killed him.  There’s no need to be mean about it, she just wanted to say hi! And to be the first to welcome Briggy to his new home, Hell! Just don’t tell Sin he’s here. Also where do these skeletons keep popping up from and why won’t they leave Cherry and Briggy alone? Go away you creeps, don’t you see Cherry and Briggy have tundras to explore and Hellbeasts to ride!

Our tour of Hell continues as Cherry brings Briggy Bundy to her home to show him around the place. Writers Alan C. Medina and Mina Elwell continue their twisted journey into the afterlife as Cherry brings on the psychotic side of her. Hellicious #2 delivers the reaping with a cuteness about it that delivers a humorous take on Hell.

The issue is Cherry taking Briggy around Hell convinced he’d enjoy it and her learning the truth about this rocker. There’s just a lot of weird cuteness as Medina and Elwell show us more of Hell and the comic’s success relies mainly on the crazy stops we’re introduced to.

The issue relies heavily on the art of Kit Wallis and colorist Jio Butler who have a style that reminds me a lot of the comics coming out in the 90s, the cute goth/demon comics of the time. The locations have details that dare you to look and with each look there’s lots to laugh and smile about. And there’s Cherry herself who takes you on it all with a cheerful glee and confusion when she eventual learns the truth about Briggy. There’s a childlike aspect that Wallis and Butler help emphasize through the art. Micah Meyers‘ lettering too helps with emphasizing the words in a way that helps enhance Cherry’s voice of a pretty spoiled child that’s also a reaper..

There’s a lot that this series reminds me of and there’s a retro vibe to it all that takes me back to some of the comics I collected as a kid in the 90s. I have no idea where this is all going but there’s something about it all that makes me want to find out.

Story: Alan C. Mediana and Mina Elwell Art: Kit Wallis
Color: Jio Butler Letterer: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.95 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Starburn Industries Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

The Luchaverse Brings the World of Lucha Libre to Comics with Rey Mysterio, Blue Demon, Jr., Konnan, Los Cadetes Del Espacio, and the Lucha Brothers

The production team behind the Lucha Underground Comics and Joey Ryan: Big in Japan have joined forces with Masked Republic, whose core businesses is the representation across all media of some of the biggest lucha libre (Mexican professional wrestling) icons, legends and superstars worldwide; to bring them together for first time ever in a shared comic book Luchaverse.  Legends Rey Mysterio, Blue Demon Jr, Konnan, and Los Cadetes del Espacio (Solar and Super Astro) will be joined by the two hottest luchadores of the modern era the Lucha Brothers Penta Zero M and Rey Fenix as the Luchaverse kicks off.

Writer Marco Lopez and Chido Comics Founder and Publisher Ivan Plaza will be co-writing the Masked Republic Luchaverse one-shots which puts in the lucha libre stars right in the middle of an earth shattering event.

A dormant and mysterious power that long ago held the fate of our planet Earth has now been released. Our legends will be put to the test, as Chido Comics and Masked Republic bring back the glory and tradition of real-life lucha libre stars in comic books taking on epic and unprecedented events based in our real world mixed with adventure, fantasy and science fiction!

In addition to writers Lopez and Plaza, thus far, the amazing creative team announced to be working on the special one-shots includes artists Ben Harvey and Bryan Magnaye (Rey Mysterio), Diego Simone (Blue Demon Jr), Javier Martin Caba (Lucha Brothers) and lettering all five books Micah Myers! All Luchaverse titles will be Executive Produced by Masked Republic’s Kevin Kleinrock and Ruben Zamora and edited by Chido Comic’s Ivan Plaza. The Rey MysterioBlue Demon Jr and Lucha Brothers One-Shot Specials will be available this year; with The Masked Republic Luchaverse: Rey Mysterio One-Shot debuting at this year’s San Diego Comic Con along with an appearance by the legendary luchador himself on Friday, July 20th! The Konnan and Los Cadetes del Espacio One-Shots will be released late 2018/early 2019.

Preview: Jirni Vol. 3 #3

JIRNI VOL 3 #3

J.T. Krul – Story  / Michael Santamaria, Elias Pineda, Mauricio Campetella – Art / John Starr – Colors / Micah Myers — Letters

Aspen’s popular fantasy adventure series, JIRNI, continues its epic third volume!

Ara takes to the skies once again in her airship, soaring higher than ever in the hopes of reaching the realm of the D’jinn, but danger lurksall around her. Meanwhile, Torinthal reveals his true purpose in capturing Luna and the other D’jinn, and it could spell doom for them and all the D’jinn – in this world and beyond.

Created by New York Times Best-Selling author J.T. Krul (Michael Turner’s Soulfire, Green Arrow) with art by newcomer Michael Santamaria,this next exciting chapter of Jirni will once again return readers to a land of untapped wonder!

JIRNI VOL 3 #3 is in stores May 16th, 2018!

FC 32 pages $3.99

Review: The Night Driver

Car chases in movies have always been a staple of action movies for a long time.  I remember the first time I watched, Steve McQueen as Doc McCoy in The Getaway, a sophisticated heist movie, oozed with old school Western aesthetics. These movies usually resonated with me long after, watching them. Even the car chase in The French Connection, was memorable not only because it was exciting but also because it was shot near my old neighborhood.

It is no mistake that popular culture is obsessed with these characters and the cars they drive as they represent the rebel in all of us, even if it is in a car.  There have been whole franchises made about them like The Fast and The Furious and The Transporter. Then there was the recent and more in tune with the old school movies I watched, Wheelman. Which is why I was more than keen to read Ken Lowery and Gavin Guidry’s mystery, Night Driver, which provides readers with a different twist.

In the opening pages, we meet the driver, an unnamed man, driving alone at night. The reader, right away, gets a peak at his thoughts, as something he has done slowly unravels at his very being. Panel by panel, he questions his every decision, his every action, as he ponders on what he could have done different. By book’s end, our driver breaks, as his mind start playing tricks on him and the guilt of his actions overcomes him.

Overall, a slow burn thriller, that reads like a better version of Tom Hardy’s Locke, with the added elements of murder and mayhem. The story by Lowery is intelligent, and gripping. The art by Guidry and Micah Meyers is stylish and striking. Altogether, somewhere between Michael Douglas’s Falling Down and Kevin Spacey’s Swimming with Sharks, lies this suspenseful twist on the modern laborer whose tale ends on the road.

Story: Ken Lowery Art: Gavin Guidry Letterer: Micah Meyers
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

New York Comic Con 2017: A.C. Medina & Fernando Pinto Talk Their New Series Monarchs

Four geniuses untouched by society descend upon Vida, a euphoric planet of endless resources with a sentient race of beings dependent on strict guidance from their leaders. However, a simple scientific experiment becomes an epic story of war, discovery, and the battle to become… a MONARCH.

Announced at New York Comic Con 2017, Monarchs is a brand new comic series from writer A.C. Medina, artist Fernando Pinto, and being published by Scout Comics.

We got a chance to talk to A.C. and Fernando about the series which debuts in 2018.

Graphic Policy: Tell us about the series. I saw the promo image at Baltimore Comic Con, but what’s the premise?

A.C. Medina: Monarchs is about four young geniuses who are sent to planet VIDA, with the task of figuring out the best form of leadership. VIDA has every resource imaginable, if you can think it, VIDA has it. Be that plants that produce actual fire embers or even electricity in the form of rocks in the mountains. The best resource found on VIDA however is its ‘Senties’, an enhanced sentient race of beings, who our leads create at their leisure,  and are broken down into five basic categories who can only do what their leaders tell them to do. With this in mind our four leads duke it out on planet Vida taking what should be theoretically a simple experiment and turning into an life long battle for supremacy.

Fernando Pinto: So like a lot of stuff to draw. But, you know, fun -cries-

GP: Where did the concept come from? Was this something you two worked on together to come up with?

FP: Alan came to me with a couple of pitches for ideas he had that he thought I would be a good fit for after seeing my work online. We settled on this for the first project to do together after I told him I really dug the world building aspect Monarchs had. I’ve been complementing it with my ideas on the graphic side but the start of it is all Alan.

ACM: The idea came from gaming mostly, I enjoy story telling in all formats and have been lucky enough to grow up with games where story matters just as it does in top selling novels. I always make sure I start with a just of an idea before finding a collaborator who fits it. When I found Fernando’s website I knew I wanted to work with him instanly so I fired off a few e-mails with some blurbs (baby ideas) for him to choose. He chose Monarchs, and from there we just ran with it. I’ll run ideas by him and he’ll tell me if I’ve finally lost it or have something worthwhile, a bunch of late night Facebook messages and e-mails and next to you know, we had a story.

GP: You said the story is influenced by RTS games. How so? Any in particular? Did that also influence the art at all?

ACM: No one particular game but just the genre over all, or better yet, a specific moment that happens towards the end of any RTS game. It’s when you know you got the game in the bag or that you’re fucked. All the moves and choices you’ve made have reached their end game and now it’s time to sit back and watch the results. This can be oddly beautiful if you’re winning or rage inducing sadness if you’ve lost. In either outcome you see the effects of power. When you win that power is kind of addicting, you revel in it. In Monarchs we highlight this feeling and jack it up into some epic sic-fi. Leadership has become a game to most when it really shouldn’t be, this is what we want to explore.

FP: I’m not the biggest gamer but my art in general I feel has a lot of game influence ’cause I love game art to death. Specially the Capcom and Square Enix stuff from the 90’s. Th energy those characters and designs have has always been an inspiration. So I’m sure there’s a bunch of stuff in there from that.

GP: So tell me a bit about the characters of the comic. Who will we find within and when it came to their look and design, how was that split between you two?

FP: Alan gave me all the freedom in the world when it came to designing the world and characters. It’s been a pleasure to work on this book. He just lets me do my thing and comments on what he thinks works or makes small notes about anything that he thinks might work better. Though if I’m being honest most of his comments are “This is awesome!” which makes me feel very warm and fuzzy inside.

ACM: Our cast contains three ‘archetypes’ of leadership and one wild card, our cover might give away who the wild card is…or does it? We wanted to play with the usual tropes of a leader and genius. We have Hakim, he’s more of the usual go-to sci-fi genius where as Shaunda and Brigitte are both very different, especially when you compare them with what Sci-Fi has told us about geniuses and leaders, Ozzy most of all. I always say my stories involve outlandish scenarios with real people in the middle of it all, Monarchs exemplifies that I feel. You’re witnessing  four high level scientists who have never had real family, who in fact, have removed themselves completely from the idea of family act like, well, family. All while trying to complete an almost impossible task in the name of progress.

GP: How long have you two been working on this series and what was the process like between you two coming up with the characters and world?

ACM: Since June… We think, it was hot outside, and we’ve been rolling ever since. It’s always a pleasure when you land a creative team that just gets it right off the bat, Fernando and I have yet to really disagree on anything which has been nice. I try to make sure the creative environment in my projects has a real team effort, sand box feel to it. With Fernando it’s been nothing less of pleasure, he slam dunks my alley oops and really brings them to life. Every so often we meet on Skype to iron out specific details and goals and I’m constantly annoying him with texts, be that of our project or just some gifs. Triona Farrell, our colorist, has brought so much to the table as well, her colors are just awesome every time, its like getting two sets of present each time this team puts in new work. We ask everyone on the team what they like, what they don’t like and make sure everyone has their say. Micah Myers our letterer who I always compare to having a shut out closer in your bullpen, he always packages it all together.

FP: Yeah, June is when we started. Alan contacted me online around April and, as it goes with most Catfish scenarios, we stroke up a (working) relationship. I’m actually a 67 year old woman from the Ukraine. Sorry you had to find out this way, dude

After I turn in my pages, Triona and Micah make them look waaaaaay better than they actually are. Those dudes are awesome

GP: I want to focus on the world and character building a bit. It’s clearly a team process but what was that like? Was there multiple iterations? How did you come up with the specific characters and their looks?

ACM: When coming up with characters I take what I like most from people and what I hate the most from people, and make some crazy love childs in between. With the world aspect, its about the same, for instance nature plays a big part into our story. On Vida you can find anything, from your more traditional resource to your very non-traditional resource. For me its the part of Sci-Fi many people seem to forget, it can be fun! We have plants that can turn into fire depending on how you use them, we have massive castle on a beach (we’ll let you guess what it’s made out of) that serves an actual powerful fortress, basically, we had fun  creating our world. Our characters have faces you don’t often see associated with their roles in most stories. In our story there are four empires, these four have very different ways of running things and we wanted them to look the part. Plus we also really wanted to have space samurais fight space marines, did we mention we have those? We do. They’re pretty awesome.

FP: Alan is really open to ideas and concepts. Once I get the descriptions I’ll throw a couple sketches his way and we’ll take it from there. I usually get a visual in my head and go from that. Seems we seem to be in the same page design wise with Alan, it’s been a really smooth ride.

GP: “Our characters have faces you don’t often see associated with their roles in most stories.” I take it you mean gender or their race? How do you decide on stuff like that as a creator?

FP: I think it comes to representation. I love comics and movies but a lot of times there’s a lot missing culture wise of the types of characters that star in commercial stories. Both of us being Latinos and the story is about the building of a new civilization. I think we’re trying to do our part to broaden that without being preachy about it.

GP: Does their ethnicity impact the character at all? And I should add how did that impact the look?

ACM: Yeah that’s one way to describe it but for me it’s more about what they represent. Our leads originally were born in different parts of the world before being brought together at a very young age. None of them have lived with culture or a society, our characters have been trained since birth to be leaders everything they know about culture and society, they’ve been taught. For me as a writer my job is to represent their backgrounds in a natural, and fluid way. I like my characters to make their mark and for that I like to mix things up, I by no means am trying to prove something more than I’m just trying to tell a good story.

A character’s ethnicity should always be considered in the creative process but it all depends on what the story is asking for. Our characters are archetypes in humanity’s way of leading. They can be anyone from anywhere, it just happens that Hakim is man of color as Shaunda is a woman of color, but that’s not why they exist, they both play a much bigger role than that. This will be my third project in and one thing you can see from my work is I have characters from all different parts of life and different looks but I always stress I am just telling stories. I want my storytelling to be as natural as possible and for that reason they reflect the world I’ve lived in. I’ve grown up in the tri-state area my whole life with a Dominican mother who’s been working in American business since Reagan, she’s the only hero I have and a constant source of inspiration. It’s the upbringing I try to reflect in my work, it just happens to be that for some it can be a shock.

GP: When it comes to this world, how much of it is mapped out? Is there some guide book somewhere?

ACM: Maybe for a trade we’ll go all inside the cover of a Lord of the Rings book with a map, maybe a for table top as well? Fernando is already hating where this is all going. That said, story wise Vida’s geography plays a huge role, without spoiling too much the natural challenges of Vida itself present a much bigger problem to our leaders than they originally thought it would. It makes for some exciting pages to say the least and again, nature is a big component of our story.

FP: As for the mapping, it all loves in Alan’s brain, I got a general Idea of where it is all going but I get surprised every time I get a script from this kid. He’s good at keeping me on my toes. After I’m done, Triona makes it all look lush and alive with her magic color powers.

GP: Interesting on the nature aspect. Have you come up with the ecosystem and “rules” of this world?

ACM: Our leaders learned everything they needed to know about Vida from their Ever-guide, at the end of each issue we’ll ‘pages’ from the Ever-guide for our readers to enjoy. There you’ll learn how the Senties are made, how Vida exists, and a bunch of other cool stuff. We took inspiration from game design on how our tech looks and works, the world building on this book has been a blast.

FP: As for the eco system, let’s just say that progress does not come without its price. We won’t go all “Mother” on you but there’s some pretty earth shattering stuff coming as the series progresses. Both my arm and tablet will be very tired after all this.

GP: This sounds very cool. Can’t wait to read it!

Preview: Grimm Tales of Terror #8

Grimm Tales of Terror #8 – “Black Eye”

Story by Joe Brusha, Ralph Tedesco, and Steve Yockey
Written by Steve Yockey
Artwork by Josh George
Colors by Rosario Costanzo
Letters by Micah Myers
Edited by Nicole Glade
Production & Design by Christopher Cote & Joi Dariel
Price: $3.99
Release Date:  2/18/15

Ghastly Award Nominated Series!

A lonely man picks up a young hitchhiker along the road. She turns out to be sweet and grateful for the ride. But what happens when a friendly ride turns into something else?

GFT_TOT_08_cover C