Tag Archives: micah meyers

Review: All We Ever Wanted: Stories of a Better World

All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindle

Mad Cave Studios Announces 4 New Titles and the 2020 Talent Search

Mad Cave Studios‘ virtual event brought forth all sorts of news from the publisher including four all-new titles as well as details on the Mad Cave 2020 Talent Search!

Hollywood Trash

Writer: Stephen Sonneveld, Artist: Pablo Verdugo (Mr. Beaver), Colors: Jose Expósito (Mr. Beaver), Letters: Justin Birch (Knights of the Golden Sun, RV9)
October 7

Ah, Hollywood! Famous for celebs, sun– and murder cults! The Privy Council is the most exclusive club in town, headed by the entertainment industry’s top mogul, a ruthless exec who enlists his famous underlings to kill the people who stole from him, two local garbage men. James and Billy must survive one epic day of sword fights, forest fires, and giant mechs! At least there’s hazard pay. Hollywood Trash​ is five-issues of all-out action and wacky satire!

Hollywood Trash

Villainous

Writer: Stonie Williams, Artist: Jef Sadzinski (Show’s End), Colors: Joana Lafuente, Letters: Justin Birch (Knights of the Golden Sun, RV9)
October 14

Villainous ​follows Tilly, one of the newest super-powered beings to join the Coalition of Heroes through their sidekick program, as she navigates the dizzying world of Super-Heroes. Working with her idols should be a dream come true, but when she learns too much too soon, Tilly’s dream quickly turns into a nightmare. As she learns more about the sordid history of the CoH, Tilly has to make a choice – Get in line and stand with her heroes or take a stand and risk becoming something more… Villainous.

Villainous

Pantomime

Writer: Christopher Sebela (Crowded, Shanghai Red), Artist: David Stoll (Metaphorical HER), Colors: Dearbhla Kelly (Red Sonja, Queen of Bad Dreams)
November 4

Haley and her brother Max are all alone after their mother’s death and a fresh start at Wayfair Academy, a special needs boarding school, isn’t what she expected. Normally, Haley would withdraw back into herself, but when she finds a family with other deaf kids, she embraces her new life and begins to come out of her shell. Until one night where the group dips their toes into crime, and the thrill is too much to leave behind. Though they soon find out by stealing from the wrong person, that this world isn’t for kids. With no one to turn to but each other, they will have to make a choice, one where no one will come out the same on the other side.

Pantomime

Terminal Punks

Writer: Matthew Erman (​Long Lost, Power Rangers, Dark Crystal), Artist: ​Shelby Criswell (The Nib), Letters: Micah Myers (Dead Beats)​
November 11

Four lousy, grimy and greasy gutter punk teens are en route to their big show in the big apple but when things go monstrously wrong and mutant animals are unleashed in the airport, our four punk heroes must put on their combat boots, fly their Black Flag and try to survive a viral genetic mutant nightmare. 

A hilarious, wild, and fun thrill-ride! ​Terminal Punks​ is a blaring colorful love letter to the music and attitude of rebellion. It is also a tongue-in-cheek takedown of rich idiots doing stupid things for bad reasons.

Terminal Punks

The Third Annual Mad Cave Talent Search is Here!

For the third year in a row, Mad Cave Studios is looking to discover and publish new talent in the comics industry. This year is a little different, as three artists and three writers will be chosen to take part in Mad Cave’s first-ever anthology!

Since the first talent search in 2018, Mad Cave Studios has continued the trend of bringing fresh voices to comics with exciting titles like Show’s End, Savage Bastards, Over the Ropes, and many more…

How Do Creators Sign Up?

The Mad Cave Studios talent search has some guidelines you need to follow in order for their editorial team to review your submission. Below is a brief overview of the contest details:

  • Contest runs from June 1, 2020, through September 1, 2020
  • Each submission entered must be set in the universe of a Mad Cave IP (Battlecats, Honor and Curse, Knights of the Golden Sun, Show’s End, etc.)
  • Six Winners (Three writers and three artists) will be announced on Wednesday, October 2nd, 2020, on PREVIEWSworld and PREVIEWSworld Weekly
  • Visit the Mad Cave Talent Search Page for complete submission guidelines
Mad Cave Talent Search 2020

ComiXology Original Youth by Curt Pires and Alex Diotto Goes from Comic to Amazon Studios

Youth #1

Youth, a new four-part weekly comic series beginning May 12, is currently in development as an original series for Amazon Studios. The comiXology Original digital comic series is by Curt Pires and Alex Diotto. Pires is attached to adapt the comic for streaming. The comic is already renewed for a second season in production and Pires has two more projects in the works with comiXology. Color for the comic is by Dee Cunniffe with lettering by Micah Myers.

The comic is about the next generation of superheroes. It’s the story of two high school students who are a queer couple and run away discovering a world different than what they have imagined.

Below is the official synopsis:

In YOUTH, Franklin and River struggle to navigate family, friends, high school, work, drugs, and all the pressures of growing up. As a queer couple, they yearn to escape their lives in a small, bigoted Midwest town. They steal River’s stepfather’s Mustang and hit the road. Their destination? California. But along the way, the car breaks down. They meet some kids who are travelling the country, partying, and attempting to find themselves. They party some more. . . . And soon everything changes.

The comic will be available for no additional cost for Amazon Prime, Kindle Unlimited and ComiXology Unlimited subscribers, in addition to being available for purchase for Kindle and ComiXology.

Review: White Savior: The Comic Book Spook #1

White Savior: The Comic Book Spook #1

True history and what the world teaches us are often at conflict. In a world where war is commonplace, the victor tells the story. This creates a problem as we find stories promulgated by the ruling class while those who challenged those in power become vilified. The most prominent example being Hannibal, who had the Roman Empire shaking from the threat of his might and his threat to their existence. To this day, his storied tales are rarely told in schools where they teach world history and his people’s genocide, is met with skepticism at the mention of most.

Another story where whitewashing had been commonplace is the story of Magellan and his visit to the Philippines. The reckless explorer as the hero in Elcan Magellan, and the man who killed him, Lapu Lapu, is a dangerous native, even a villain. The movie, like Last Samurai and Dances With Wolves, propel the White Savior syndrome, something that disgraces most stories about people of color. In the debut issue of White Savior – The Comic Book Spoof, we find a protagonist who soon finds out one story he was told as a child is not completely true.

A grandfather recounts a story about a white man, Nathan Garin, who leads a group of warriors into certain doom. It’s a story he has told his grandson, Todd Parker, a hundred times. As an adult, his reticence for the story has only become ever-present.  Todd’s grandfather assures him that this story is true and that his being a history teacher is important to why he should teach it, as in his grandfather’s mind, it’s all true. The story shifts to feudal Japan, where the Akuna Clan is at war and where Todd is suddenly transported. From there, his grandfather’s story and reality clash.

Overall, a fresh take on the time travel parody. It challenges stereotypes, presents realistic people of color, and still feels groundbreaking. The story by Eric Nguyen and Scott Burman is exhilarating, perceptive, and captivating. The art by the creative team is magnificent. Altogether, a story that feels like a cross between Back To The Future and Real Genius, both irreverent and pertinent.

Story: Eric Nguyen and Scott Burman
Art: Eric Nguyen, Micah Meyers,
and Iwan Joko Triyono
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Oathbound #1

Oathbound #1

Clive Owen is a one of those actors whose believability in roles is the reason so many people watch him. His ability to immerse himself is what makes people relate to him. The first movie I remember him in was Children Of Men, a story in which he plays a gun for hire in a dystopian future where no one can get pregnant. He played the character with ease, grit, and soulfulness. You couldn’t help but root for his character.

One of my favorite movies by him was the enigmatic yet hard-boiled I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead. He portrays a former gangster whose brother has suspiciously committed suicide. He displayed what Descartes called “the duality of man,” where he easily turned back to his former life in name of vengeance. In the debut issue of Oathbound, we find a protagonist much like Owen’s Will, where his old life interferes with his present life and he is forced to act.

We’re taken to 1868 Nevada where a posse is about to undertake a score of a lifetime by stealing enslaved Elves. Of course, nothing goes as planned. One of the posse members, Cole Jamison, meets the love of his life during the heist leading to a change of heart. We fast forward 20 years later, high in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Cole and his daughter Voila living a fairly boring normal life. Their seemingly quiet existence gets interrupted when a band of Goblins decides to cause a ruckus near the house leading Cole to spring into action.

Overall, a powerful story that will remind readers of Wynonna Earp but will find a more entertaining story. The story by Kevin Cuffe is even paced, well-characterized, and masterfully told. The art by the creative team is beautiful. Altogether, a story that is both emotive and action-packed, providing readers with a rare story that will move you and entertain you.

Story: Kevin Cuffe
Art: Paul Gori, Hedwin Jimenez Zaldivar, Micah Meyers,
and Shawn Greenleaf
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Trey Walker, Hoyt Silva, and Micah Meyers Take you to the Last Stop

Last Stop

Time is ticking for the world’s last superhero. Lincoln Adams (aka Unstoppable) must make peace with the changing world around him—can there truly be a place for him in a world without Supers? After learning he has a terminal disease, Lincoln sees an easy way out; however, the re-emergence of an old arch-nemesis and a new shadowy masked figure turn Lincoln’s plans of an easy passing on their head. Can Lincoln stop this new threat before the disease stops him?

Last Stop is the brand new series written by Trey Walker, with art by Hoyt Silva, and letters by Micah Myers. Published by Scout Comics, the series debuts Fall 2019.

Exclusive Preview: Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

(W) Marco Lopez, Ivan Plaza
(A) Puis Calzada, Bryan Magnaye
(L) Micah Meyers
(CA) Puis Calzada, Rosa Colón
Order Now!

“As the leader of The Ambassadors, Konnan has faced off against doomsday cults, alien invaders, rogue temporal thieves and civilizations at the center of the earth. Now, the organization faces its greatest mission: getting to the bottom of a seemingly unstoppable series of worldwide catastrophes of unknown origin. Ambassadors’ bases are being destroyed one by one by a new global criminal faction calling themselves the Knights of Draconis! Will this ruthless and cunning organization on the rise put an end to the Ambassadors and all that they protect?”

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konan & the Ambassadors #1

Review: Wyrd #1

Wyrd #1

There are problems, cases, too strange for US law enforcement to solve. Pitor Wyrd is the one who solves them-for a fee, of course. An unaging, invincible detective with a penchant for the strange, Wyrd is the one the government calls when things go very badly and very strange.

This issue: Crimea. A failed attempt at recreating a certain US supersolider. A monster roaming the countryside. A trail of bodies.

Reading the description, I went into Wyrd #1 expecting a riff on the X-Files and after checking out the first issue, it’s much more John Constantine than anything else. That’s not a bad thing at all. Writer Curt Pires delivers an entertaining issue but at the same time it’s nothing that really feels unique, so far.

We learn a bit about Piotr Wyrd mostly through teasing and he’s a hard drinking individual who doesn’t seem to enjoy life and has made some decisions in the past he regrets. He’s Constantine. And so far, that’s the biggest issue. He’s a her we’ve seen before a few times and isn’t unique enough. Now, that might change over the next four issues but for the first, it’s enough to entertain.

The art by Antonio Fuso is some solid style with coloring by Stefano Simeone it combines to create a visually interesting start. There’s a lot of use of the art to tease us about Wyrd’s story. There’s a lot of show, don’t tell and that extends to the big bad at the end where we’re visually hinted as to what’s going on. The lettering by Micah Meyers is important too giving a bit more personality to the big bad as well. Without that right lettering, the villain would just feel like a roided out reject from the mutant gang in Dark Knight Returns.

There’s nothing bad about this first issue. There’s also, so far, nothing that makes it really stand out. The art is good and tells a lot of the story. The main character feels a bit derivative. The villain is nothing all that special and things wrap up rather quickly. The first issue feels like a bit more of a teaser as to what’s to come than a story itself. Not enough unique to really get into what’s presented.

Story: Curt Pires Art: Antonio Fuso
Color: Stefano Simeone Lettering: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for reviews

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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