Tag Archives: micah meyers

Review: Oathbound #1

Oathbound #1

Clive Owen is a one of those actors whose believability in roles is the reason so many people watch him. His ability to immerse himself is what makes people relate to him. The first movie I remember him in was Children Of Men, a story in which he plays a gun for hire in a dystopian future where no one can get pregnant. He played the character with ease, grit, and soulfulness. You couldn’t help but root for his character.

One of my favorite movies by him was the enigmatic yet hard-boiled I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead. He portrays a former gangster whose brother has suspiciously committed suicide. He displayed what Descartes called “the duality of man,” where he easily turned back to his former life in name of vengeance. In the debut issue of Oathbound, we find a protagonist much like Owen’s Will, where his old life interferes with his present life and he is forced to act.

We’re taken to 1868 Nevada where a posse is about to undertake a score of a lifetime by stealing enslaved Elves. Of course, nothing goes as planned. One of the posse members, Cole Jamison, meets the love of his life during the heist leading to a change of heart. We fast forward 20 years later, high in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Cole and his daughter Voila living a fairly boring normal life. Their seemingly quiet existence gets interrupted when a band of Goblins decides to cause a ruckus near the house leading Cole to spring into action.

Overall, a powerful story that will remind readers of Wynonna Earp but will find a more entertaining story. The story by Kevin Cuffe is even paced, well-characterized, and masterfully told. The art by the creative team is beautiful. Altogether, a story that is both emotive and action-packed, providing readers with a rare story that will move you and entertain you.

Story: Kevin Cuffe
Art: Paul Gori, Hedwin Jimenez Zaldivar, Micah Meyers,
and Shawn Greenleaf
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Trey Walker, Hoyt Silva, and Micah Meyers Take you to the Last Stop

Last Stop

Time is ticking for the world’s last superhero. Lincoln Adams (aka Unstoppable) must make peace with the changing world around him—can there truly be a place for him in a world without Supers? After learning he has a terminal disease, Lincoln sees an easy way out; however, the re-emergence of an old arch-nemesis and a new shadowy masked figure turn Lincoln’s plans of an easy passing on their head. Can Lincoln stop this new threat before the disease stops him?

Last Stop is the brand new series written by Trey Walker, with art by Hoyt Silva, and letters by Micah Myers. Published by Scout Comics, the series debuts Fall 2019.

Exclusive Preview: Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konnan & the Ambassadors #1

(W) Marco Lopez, Ivan Plaza
(A) Puis Calzada, Bryan Magnaye
(L) Micah Meyers
(CA) Puis Calzada, Rosa Colón
Order Now!

“As the leader of The Ambassadors, Konnan has faced off against doomsday cults, alien invaders, rogue temporal thieves and civilizations at the center of the earth. Now, the organization faces its greatest mission: getting to the bottom of a seemingly unstoppable series of worldwide catastrophes of unknown origin. Ambassadors’ bases are being destroyed one by one by a new global criminal faction calling themselves the Knights of Draconis! Will this ruthless and cunning organization on the rise put an end to the Ambassadors and all that they protect?”

Masked Republic Luchaverse: Konan & the Ambassadors #1

Review: Wyrd #1

Wyrd #1

There are problems, cases, too strange for US law enforcement to solve. Pitor Wyrd is the one who solves them-for a fee, of course. An unaging, invincible detective with a penchant for the strange, Wyrd is the one the government calls when things go very badly and very strange. 

This issue: Crimea. A failed attempt at recreating a certain US supersolider. A monster roaming the countryside. A trail of bodies.

Reading the description, I went into Wyrd #1 expecting a riff on the X-Files and after checking out the first issue, it’s much more John Constantine than anything else. That’s not a bad thing at all. Writer Curt Pires delivers an entertaining issue but at the same time it’s nothing that really feels unique, so far.

We learn a bit about Piotr Wyrd mostly through teasing and he’s a hard drinking individual who doesn’t seem to enjoy life and has made some decisions in the past he regrets. He’s Constantine. And so far, that’s the biggest issue. He’s a her we’ve seen before a few times and isn’t unique enough. Now, that might change over the next four issues but for the first, it’s enough to entertain.

The art by Antonio Fuso is some solid style with coloring by Stefano Simeone it combines to create a visually interesting start. There’s a lot of use of the art to tease us about Wyrd’s story. There’s a lot of show, don’t tell and that extends to the big bad at the end where we’re visually hinted as to what’s going on. The lettering by Micah Meyers is important too giving a bit more personality to the big bad as well. Without that right lettering, the villain would just feel like a roided out reject from the mutant gang in Dark Knight Returns.

There’s nothing bad about this first issue. There’s also, so far, nothing that makes it really stand out. The art is good and tells a lot of the story. The main character feels a bit derivative. The villain is nothing all that special and things wrap up rather quickly. The first issue feels like a bit more of a teaser as to what’s to come than a story itself. Not enough unique to really get into what’s presented.

Story: Curt Pires Art: Antonio Fuso
Color: Stefano Simeone Lettering: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for reviews

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Hellicious #2

Well that was an awkward meeting but hey, Cherry scared Briggy Bundy! Actually she may have killed him.  There’s no need to be mean about it, she just wanted to say hi! And to be the first to welcome Briggy to his new home, Hell! Just don’t tell Sin he’s here. Also where do these skeletons keep popping up from and why won’t they leave Cherry and Briggy alone? Go away you creeps, don’t you see Cherry and Briggy have tundras to explore and Hellbeasts to ride!

Our tour of Hell continues as Cherry brings Briggy Bundy to her home to show him around the place. Writers Alan C. Medina and Mina Elwell continue their twisted journey into the afterlife as Cherry brings on the psychotic side of her. Hellicious #2 delivers the reaping with a cuteness about it that delivers a humorous take on Hell.

The issue is Cherry taking Briggy around Hell convinced he’d enjoy it and her learning the truth about this rocker. There’s just a lot of weird cuteness as Medina and Elwell show us more of Hell and the comic’s success relies mainly on the crazy stops we’re introduced to.

The issue relies heavily on the art of Kit Wallis and colorist Jio Butler who have a style that reminds me a lot of the comics coming out in the 90s, the cute goth/demon comics of the time. The locations have details that dare you to look and with each look there’s lots to laugh and smile about. And there’s Cherry herself who takes you on it all with a cheerful glee and confusion when she eventual learns the truth about Briggy. There’s a childlike aspect that Wallis and Butler help emphasize through the art. Micah Meyers‘ lettering too helps with emphasizing the words in a way that helps enhance Cherry’s voice of a pretty spoiled child that’s also a reaper..

There’s a lot that this series reminds me of and there’s a retro vibe to it all that takes me back to some of the comics I collected as a kid in the 90s. I have no idea where this is all going but there’s something about it all that makes me want to find out.

Story: Alan C. Mediana and Mina Elwell Art: Kit Wallis
Color: Jio Butler Letterer: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.95 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Starburn Industries Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

The Luchaverse Brings the World of Lucha Libre to Comics with Rey Mysterio, Blue Demon, Jr., Konnan, Los Cadetes Del Espacio, and the Lucha Brothers

The production team behind the Lucha Underground Comics and Joey Ryan: Big in Japan have joined forces with Masked Republic, whose core businesses is the representation across all media of some of the biggest lucha libre (Mexican professional wrestling) icons, legends and superstars worldwide; to bring them together for first time ever in a shared comic book Luchaverse.  Legends Rey Mysterio, Blue Demon Jr, Konnan, and Los Cadetes del Espacio (Solar and Super Astro) will be joined by the two hottest luchadores of the modern era the Lucha Brothers Penta Zero M and Rey Fenix as the Luchaverse kicks off.

Writer Marco Lopez and Chido Comics Founder and Publisher Ivan Plaza will be co-writing the Masked Republic Luchaverse one-shots which puts in the lucha libre stars right in the middle of an earth shattering event.

A dormant and mysterious power that long ago held the fate of our planet Earth has now been released. Our legends will be put to the test, as Chido Comics and Masked Republic bring back the glory and tradition of real-life lucha libre stars in comic books taking on epic and unprecedented events based in our real world mixed with adventure, fantasy and science fiction!

In addition to writers Lopez and Plaza, thus far, the amazing creative team announced to be working on the special one-shots includes artists Ben Harvey and Bryan Magnaye (Rey Mysterio), Diego Simone (Blue Demon Jr), Javier Martin Caba (Lucha Brothers) and lettering all five books Micah Myers! All Luchaverse titles will be Executive Produced by Masked Republic’s Kevin Kleinrock and Ruben Zamora and edited by Chido Comic’s Ivan Plaza. The Rey MysterioBlue Demon Jr and Lucha Brothers One-Shot Specials will be available this year; with The Masked Republic Luchaverse: Rey Mysterio One-Shot debuting at this year’s San Diego Comic Con along with an appearance by the legendary luchador himself on Friday, July 20th! The Konnan and Los Cadetes del Espacio One-Shots will be released late 2018/early 2019.

Preview: Jirni Vol. 3 #3

JIRNI VOL 3 #3

J.T. Krul – Story  / Michael Santamaria, Elias Pineda, Mauricio Campetella – Art / John Starr – Colors / Micah Myers — Letters

Aspen’s popular fantasy adventure series, JIRNI, continues its epic third volume!

Ara takes to the skies once again in her airship, soaring higher than ever in the hopes of reaching the realm of the D’jinn, but danger lurksall around her. Meanwhile, Torinthal reveals his true purpose in capturing Luna and the other D’jinn, and it could spell doom for them and all the D’jinn – in this world and beyond.

Created by New York Times Best-Selling author J.T. Krul (Michael Turner’s Soulfire, Green Arrow) with art by newcomer Michael Santamaria,this next exciting chapter of Jirni will once again return readers to a land of untapped wonder!

JIRNI VOL 3 #3 is in stores May 16th, 2018!

FC 32 pages $3.99

Review: The Night Driver

Car chases in movies have always been a staple of action movies for a long time.  I remember the first time I watched, Steve McQueen as Doc McCoy in The Getaway, a sophisticated heist movie, oozed with old school Western aesthetics. These movies usually resonated with me long after, watching them. Even the car chase in The French Connection, was memorable not only because it was exciting but also because it was shot near my old neighborhood.

It is no mistake that popular culture is obsessed with these characters and the cars they drive as they represent the rebel in all of us, even if it is in a car.  There have been whole franchises made about them like The Fast and The Furious and The Transporter. Then there was the recent and more in tune with the old school movies I watched, Wheelman. Which is why I was more than keen to read Ken Lowery and Gavin Guidry’s mystery, Night Driver, which provides readers with a different twist.

In the opening pages, we meet the driver, an unnamed man, driving alone at night. The reader, right away, gets a peak at his thoughts, as something he has done slowly unravels at his very being. Panel by panel, he questions his every decision, his every action, as he ponders on what he could have done different. By book’s end, our driver breaks, as his mind start playing tricks on him and the guilt of his actions overcomes him.

Overall, a slow burn thriller, that reads like a better version of Tom Hardy’s Locke, with the added elements of murder and mayhem. The story by Lowery is intelligent, and gripping. The art by Guidry and Micah Meyers is stylish and striking. Altogether, somewhere between Michael Douglas’s Falling Down and Kevin Spacey’s Swimming with Sharks, lies this suspenseful twist on the modern laborer whose tale ends on the road.

Story: Ken Lowery Art: Gavin Guidry Letterer: Micah Meyers
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

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