Tag Archives: mark hamill

Robert Kirkman’s Invincible Casts Steven Yeun, Sandra Oh, and Mark Hamill

Invincible

Robert Kirkman‘s Invincible is picking up a hell of a voice cast. The animated Amazon series, the first for Kirkman, has added an impressive amount of talent not just behind the mic but on the screen period.

Steven Yeun, who played Glenn Rhee on Kirkman’s The Walking Dead, will topline the voice cast.

The star packed casst includes J.K. Simmons, Sandra Oh, Seth Rogen (who is attached to the feature film take on Invincible), Gillian Jacobs, Andrew Rannells, Zazie Beetz, Mark Hamill, Walton Goggins, Jason Mantzoukas, Mae Whitman, Chris Diamantopoulos, Melise, Kevin Michael Richardson, Grey Griffin, and Max Burkholder.

The series will launch with either hour long episodes. It’s based on Kirkman’s comic series of the same name which recently ended its run and launched in 2003 running 144 issues. Kirkman created the series with Cory Walker and Ryan Ottley took over on art with the eighth issue.

The story is about Mark Grayson (Yeun) whose father is the most power superhero on the planet, Omni-Man (Simmons). Mark develops powers of his own and learns his father might not be as super as it seems.

The series will launch in 2020.

(via The Hollywood Reporter)

The Last Jedi Bids Farewell to The Hero’s Journey

*Warning: This article contains spoilers for Star Wars: The Last Jedi. If you have not seen the movie, proceed at your own risk*

When I was 10th grade, I had an excellent English teacher who really supported me writing about pop culture critically, and she was even my advisor for my 12th grade capstone where I wrote about the evolution of action heroes from Achilles from the Iliad to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. This all started when she showed the 1988 Bill Moyers PBS documentary Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth that laid out the idea of the Hero’s Journey and used the original Star Wars trilogy as a metaphor it. I thought this was super cool because I was a big Star Wars geek complete with my own homebrew Revenge of the Sith RPG and would spend time free time between classes editing Wookieepedia in the computer lab. And one thing that drew people to the original Star Wars films (And not the prequels so much) was its archetypes and dependable structure of good versus evil, plucky underdog heroes, and musical leitmotifs. Plus Han Solo is still the epitome of cool. (RIP)

Star Wars: The Force Awakens continued that theme by keeping similar elements from the original trilogy like a plucky underdog (Female this time) hero from a desolate desert planet, a masked/red laser sword wielding antagonist with loads of daddy/mentor issues and the possible hope of redemption, and of course, a big space station blowing up at the end. And with its thinly drawn characters, Rogue One was only emotionally resonant or exciting when reliant on nostalgia for previous movies like the Darth Vader scene. However, Star Wars: The Last Jedi, replaces the Hero with a Thousand Faces with cynical asshole Luke Skywalker and a battle between good and evil with a tale of war profiteering, Pyrrhic victories, and yes, a casino heist. Also, Snoke is a joke, and Rey‘s parentage doesn’t matter.

In an early, not-really-a-training-montage scene, Luke calls Rey, “Rey from nowhere”, and later on in the big not-really-a-reveal, Kylo Ren tells Rey that her parents were just scavengers that sold her for extra drink money. (This second one could be a lie.) The other three leads have almost equally as humble roots as Rey. Finn was a Stormtrooper janitor, bright new cast member Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran) had a maintenance job on a Resistance bomber, and the most conventionally heroic Poe Dameron gets a demotion after losing almost the entire Resistance bombing fleet to destroy one First Order flagship. They aren’t Jedi apprentices, royalty, or the scions of Obi-Wan Kenobi or Anakin Skywalker, but regular people who have lived the legends and legacy of Star Wars and geek out about Luke Skywalker or Han Solo much like the fans of the movies. In fairy tales and myths, often ordinary people ended up being secret princes, but with the exception of Rey’s Force abilities, this doesn’t really happen in The Last Jedi.

In probably its most controversial move, The Last Jedi also deconstructs and humanizes the larger than life Ur-hero Luke Skywalker, and Mark Hamill is up for the task. The quirkiness of the planet Ahch-To with its Porgs and sassy alien nuns is a definite callback to Dagobah, but Luke is no great motivator like Yoda was in Empire Strikes Back and spurns Rey for most of this segment of the film beginning by tossing his old lightsaber into the sea. He avoids training her for most of the film, and when he does train Rey, he berates her and compares her raw power to Kylo Ren. The big twist with his character is that in a moment of weakness he ignited his lightsaber, thought about killing Kylo, and Kylo saw this moment and truly fell to the Dark Side. It’s cool to see this flashback from both Luke and Kylo Ren’s POV and shows both characters’ weaknesses as Kylo spends most of the film trying to destroy all the structures of power, both good and evil, and trying to bond with Rey along the way. However, Rian Johnson doesn’t cop out and redeem him just yet and continues to portray him as very powerful, yet childish man who decides to renege on an easy victory for the First Order so he can settle his grudge with Luke and the Jedi order.

As well as Luke, Rian Johnson deconstructs the scoundrel with a heart of gold (and by extension, the late Han Solo.) through the character of DJ, an enigmatic smuggler played by Benicio del Toro. Johnson and del Toro play up the heart of gold aspects for most of his storyline by having him forge an unlikely friendship with BB-8 and rescue Finn and Rose when they fail badly at finding someone to hack First Order security. The biggest heartstring pulled is when DJ takes Rose’s dead sister’s necklace presumably for collateral, but actually because the metal it’s made of is a great conductor. However, this is all for naught as DJ got a better deal from Captain Phasma and the First Order, and Finn and Rose are captured and sentenced to death. Sometimes, scoundrels are just scoundrels, and the highest bidder wins the day. (Unless they get a last minute save from BB-8 in an AT-ST walker.) DJ gets some of the smartest lines of the movies like, “It’s all a machine, partner. Live free, don’t join.” DJ isn’t a great guy, but this is some good advice. In the real world, there are no good guys and bad guys; even the most decent people have flaws. This is basically the takeaway from The Last Jedi too.

Throughout The Last Jedi, Rian Johnson doesn’t just find the cracks in character archetypes. It examines and tries to correct the weaknesses in Star Wars plots and makes them more relevant to the real world than quests and space battles. The previous Star Wars films have super been into one warrior’s heroism saving the day for everyone whether that’s Anakin blowing up the Trade Federation ship in Phantom Menace, Luke destroying the Death Star in A New Hope, or Han, Finn, and Chewbacca blowing up the shield generator for Starkiller Base in The Force Awakens. However, the big opening setpiece where Poe goes mano a mano with a Dreadnaught ends in heavy losses, and his plan to break into a Star Destroyer and destroy their hyperspace tracker fails too. Rian Johnson is establishing a new Star Wars status quo where the big picture of the rebellion is more important than individual heroics even though that can come in handy like Luke’s astral form inspiring a little boy on a First Order occupied planet to pick up a broom and fight back against his masters in the final shot of the film. Sacrifices will be made, like the brave strategist Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern), flying at light speed into the First Order fleet, but they are for the survival of the rebellion and of hope.

Rian Johnson uses the Star Wars storytelling devices of space battles, heroic last stands, and lightsaber duels while also poking holes in these things. This is wisdom tempered with a pinch of callbacks to earlier films (See the Yoda cameo.) and a lot of real world relevance. The Last Jedi breaks the mold of a kind of Manichean fairy tale battle between good and evil and instead critiques power structures whether that is the presumably good Jedi Order (Some of Luke’s best lines are throwing shade on their actions during the prequels.) or the evil First Order.

In both Johnson’s approach to Star Wars things like The Force and in his characterization and storytelling in The Last Jedi, he chooses balance and thoughtfulness over nostalgia and a slavish adherence to aging archetypes like Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey. And I think Campbell himself would be okay with this as he said in The Power of Myth, “The virtues of the past are the vices of today. And many of what were thought to be the vices of the past are the necessities of today.”

To remain vibrant, stories and myths have to evolve and reflect the society in which they were created, and The Last Jedi does this through the diversity of their main cast and their focus on regular people striking a force for good instead of some Chosen One with a hallowed destiny and blah blah blah midichlorians stuff.

The Killing Joke: How the Adaptation Made it More Problematic and Less Fave

Despite the Killing Joke‘s place in the history of fridging women in superhero comics, I still have a great fondness for the Alan Moore/Brian Bolland story (in fact, I’ve often thought that the story could have been done without fridging Barbara Gordon at all) and so when I heard that it was going to be turned into an animated movie with Kevin Conroy, Mark Hamill, and Bruce Timm, I was thrilled and I got myself a ticket. (I even accidentally showed up a week early because I forgot which Monday the screening was…)

And then came rumors about the adaptation, and then came SDCC. I felt genuinely torn about whether to go ahead – if it was as bad as it sounded, I didn’t want to support the film; on the other hand, I hadn’t seen the film and wanted to be able to judge from primary evidence. Plus, I’d already bought the ticket and a bunch of my friends were going, so I waffled my way into going.

So is it as bad as people at SDCC thought? In some ways no, and in some ways it’s worse.

WARNING: Spoilers in full for the Killing Joke, which involves violence against women.

The Prologue:

So first let’s talk about the not-as-bad. Some of the reviews and first impressions that have come out suggest that “we meet Barbara Gordon as a young librarian who has started donning the Batgirl costume in order to attract the attention of Batman.” While everyone’s experience of a film is subjective, I think this reading is based on a mis-reading of one particular line.

There’s a scene in the Prologue where Batgirl is arguing with Batman over being taken off a case and she yells at him that she “got into this because of you.” (By the way, all of these quotes from the film should be taken as paraphrase from memory because I didn’t have the opportunity to take notes and there’s no script available) The context of her line is that Batman’s just told her that he doesn’t trust her because costumed crime-fighting is just a game for her, whereas Batgirl is pointing out that she became Batgirl because she was inspired by Batman and he’s been acting as her mentor. The two of them don’t have a sexual relationship at this point nor is Batgirl actively trying to start one, so I find this reading strange because it pushes the (arguably rather sexist) narrative that Batgirl is some sort of crazed groupie.

What might have led people to that conclusion is that after this line, Batgirl and Batman have sex. Now, I don’t necessarily have a problem with this in the abstract. While some might feel that “Batman has had a primarily parental relationship with Barbara, which makes this scene problematic for many fans on its most basic level,” I don’t agree. Having watched a lot of the Adam West show where Batgirl was substantially older than Robin and Batman would go into these rhapsodies about the perfume of this mystery woman, the idea isn’t without precedent.

However, the handling of this plotline is horrible, in ways that do minor damage to Barbara’s character, but arguably way more damage to Batman’s character. It’s bad enough that there is this framing of Barbara being hot for her yoga teacher, although her line that she has “a man in her life” is as much to try to fend off her camp gay coworker who might as well have stepped out of Patton Oswalt’s sketch on the “Gay Best Friend” as it is a statement of her interest. But what’s much worse is that the act itself is a horrible cliche slap-slap-kiss moment, where Batgirl is fighting Batman on a roof because she’s hit her limit with Batman’s bullshit, judo-flips him into the ground, and then pins him, and then they fuck. While a gargoyle watches.

(Poor guys can’t even close their eyes…)

In the sold-out screening I was in, this was a moment where the entire audience erupted in groans and laughter, because it was such a cheesy scene and didn’t fit Barbara Gordon’s character at all. The rooftops location, the fight-fight-kiss dynamic, the costumes – this is a Catwoman scene and it’s a played-out Catwoman scene at that.

Is what follows accurately described as her “using sex and then pining for Bruce,” as Jeremy Konrad said in that now-infamous Comic-Con panel? No. In fact, it’s kind of the reverse (and this is why I said the Prologue does more damage to Batman than Batgirl). Batgirl handles the event like an adult, telling Batman that “it’s just sex, it doesn’t have to be a thing,” rather than trying to manipulate him in any way. It’s Batman who acts like an immature asshole, refusing to work with her or take her calls, and generally acting like a remote, emotionally-stunted jackass.

All of which reinforces the basic problem with Batman in the Prologue: he’s a giant control freak who literally tells Batgirl that she has to do everything he says, who orders her “off the case” like some grizzled police captain in an 80s buddy-cop film, and who tells Batgirl he doesn’t trust her because she hasn’t stared into “the abyss… where all hope dies.” (which is a really hoary 90′s grimdark anti-hero trope, lands with a thud in the moment, and arguably contradicts the thematic thrust of Moore’s story), and who literally mansplains objectification to Batgirl. (Yes, at some level he’s explaining it for the audience, but it’s still fucked up that it’s him doing it rather than Barbara, who as a grown woman knows far better than he what being objectified by a man is like.)

Needless to say, this doesn’t fit the Batman of the Killing Joke, who’s in an unusually introspective, empathetic, and contemplative mood – meeting with Joker in Arkham Asylum because he’s worried he’s going to end up killing him, rushing to comfort Jim Gordon, offering to rehabilitate the Joker. More on this when we get to that part of the movie. So there’s a really weird disconnection between the two halves of the movie, as we’re really getting two Batman, one written by Brian Azzarello and Bruce Timm and one written by Alan Moore, and the two don’t feel like they’re the same person.

Speaking of Azzarello and Timm, we have to talk about the source of the conflict between Batgirl and Batman, the main bad guy of the Prologue. He’s a brand-new villain named Perry Franz (mon dieu), a would-be high-tech crime-boss who becomes obsessed with Batgirl (to the point of hiring a sex worker to wear a Batgirl mask while they have sex) when she foils an armored-truck robbery. This guy is clearly meant to be a parallel to the Joker – he’s got the whole Xanatos Gambit thing going, he plays this cat-and-mouse game where he’s leaving messages for Batgirl with the cops and taunts her over the phone, and so on. Batman argues that Batgirl is letting Perry get to her and she’s underestimating him, and she rightfully takes this as Batman thinking she’s not up to the task.

However, Perry is just not that impressive, ultimately nothing more than the shallow “punk” Batgirl pegs him as when they first meet. In addition to the thing with the sex worker and the messages, his go-to move when they first fight is to roofie her (it’s not just a knockout gas, he talks about having “fun” with her after she passes out, although thankfully Batgirl manages to save herself). When you get right down to it, he’s a date rapist whose master crime come down to a failed bank robbery and stealing his uncle’s online banking password.

Now, I disagree with those who’ve argued that, in the film, “the damnable part is that Batman is proven right” about Barbara not being ready. In the final clash, Batman is the one who underestimates Perry, who hits the Batmobile with a couple RPGs, wounding him and forcing him into a desperate struggle to survive against machine-gun wielding thugs. Batgirl is the one who saves him with a motorcycle-and-steverdore’s hook combo, and she’s the one who takes down Perry. This is probably where Azzarello and Timm were coming from with the “she’s a strong character” argument.

But where they fall short is the follow-through. Even though Batgirl saves Batman, we don’t get a scene where he thanks her or admits that he was wrong and learned a lesson – the “strong female character” stuff that Azzarello and Timm argued they were doing isn’t incorporated into the text. Instead, Batgirl beats the living shit out of Perry because “you ruined everything” – and this, rather than the scene where she has sex with Batman on the roof is where she sounds like a crazied groupie – and this is her moment of staring into the abyss. Because she loses her temper and administers a beating far less egregious than many that Batman has handed out (which I think is what Timm was gesturing to with his comment about “pining over the violence”) because of this penny-ante and flimsy one-shot villain, she decides to hang up the cowl and stop being Batgirl. (Which again, kind of works against the Killing Joke’s story..)

It’s far too inconsequential and disconnected from any core elements of Barbara’s character – her family or friends, her motives for fighting crime, a more established villain with a stronger personal connection – to carry the weight of what should be a momentous decision. And that, rather than the fact that she has sex with Batman, is what weakens Batgirl as a character.

The Killing Joke:

What makes all of these creative choices so strange is that it’s not like the controversy over the Killing Joke was news to anyone involved. Everyone on the creative team knew very well that the problem with the Killing Joke is the Joker shooting and paralyzing Barbara Gordon in order to motivate Jim Gordon and Batman. It’s a classic case of fridging, and the gendered nature of the event is further emphasized by the Joker taking nude photos of Barbara to use in his haunted house ride.

No matter whether you think that Barbara becoming Oracle was an important moment for the representation of the disabled or whether you prefer the New 52 or Batgirl of Burnside as a reclamation of the character, the moment is still ugly, feeding into the worst aspects of 90s comics, and is ultimately unnecessary. There’s quite a few ways to make the story work without that scene, and it oddly contradicts the moment at the end of the comic where the Joker turns the joke-flag gun on Batman.

So you think they would have approached the adaptation with that in mind. Instead, as I’ve already suggested, the two halves clash. Given that in the comics, Barbara’s paralyzing was the moment where she had to stop being Batgirl and become Oracle instead, the Prologue has her retired when she’s attacked. Likewise, given that Batman’s had a much closer relationship with her than he did at this point in the comic, the fact that they decided to do the comic essentially page-for-page makes Batman’s very limited interactions with Barbara and muted emotional response both to the physical damage done to her and the Joker’s sexualization of the attack read like a non-response to what should be a huge deal. Moreover, it conflicts with Batman’s major arc in the story – his attempt to reach out to the Joker, even in the end, makes him seem completely uncaring about his former lover.

And of course, there’s the moment itself, which you’d think the creators of the film would treat with heightened sensitivity. Instead, the moment is intensified (in what is otherwise a very faithful adaptation of the comic) in two ways: first, the “shot” is held on what is the second-to-last panel on the right, with the Joker slowly moving his hand down Barbara’s chest and then the “camera” showing us Barbara’s opened shirt and bra. Second, later on when Batman is canvassing the city for the Joker, there’s an elaboration of a single panel where Batman’s interviewing a group of sex workers where we learn that the first thing that the Joker does when he gets out is to make use of their services, but this time he hasn’t and maybe he’s found a new girl. Now, you can argue that the Joker hasn’t come by because he’s busy with his quasi-suicidal mission to break Gordon and Batman, but the text leaves itself open to the interpretation that Joker did something more than just photograph Barbara.

As I’ve said above, the above page is my least favorite part of the comic, and even the people who don’t have a problem with that section will generally agree that the heart of the comic is in the hypothetical backstory for the Joker, his argument to Jim Gordon that madness is the only rational response to an irrational and random universe, his attempt to prove that any ordinary person is capable of turning into the Joker as a result of “one bad day,” Jim Gordon’s defiant hold on his sanity and his belief in the capacity of human beings to create meaning through institutions like the law, and Batman’s attempt to reach out to the Joker. So how does the film handle that?

The answer is that it does only an okay job, there’s a few moments where it becomes something special (I especially love this shot of the Joker watching the carnival lights come on, because it has some energy that’s often missing), but nothing near good enough to make up for everything it gets wrong that we’ve already talked about. Kevin Conroy is fine, Mark Hamill puts in a great vocal performance, but the art and direction fall short of what Moore and Bolland and John Higgins (the colorist) accomplished on the page. For example, let’s take the famous last page of the comic, shown above. There’s a lot that can and has been said about these nine panels – the use of the palette of reds and purples and oranges and yellows that runs throughout the comic, the way that the headlights turn into the flashlight beam from the joke (which Moore has already set up from the scene where Batman goes to the lunatic asylum, which he further emphasizes with the use of repeating dialogue), the ambiguity of the laughter and the siren that convinced Grant Morrison that Batman killed the Joker, and on and on.

In the movie? It’s just a shot of a puddle. No beam of light, no paralleling, nothing of what made this comic special in the first place. Maybe Alan Moore was right – there are some things comics can do that movies can’t.

Batman: The Killing Joke Gets an R Rating

Batman The Killing JokeIt shouldn’t be a shock to anyone but Warner Bros. Home Entertainment has accepted an “R” rating from the MPAA for their upcoming animated film, Batman: The Killing Joke. I say it shouldn’t be a shock since the original source material graphic novel is what I’d consider an “R” rating as well. This is the first non-PG/PG-13 rated movie in the nine-year and 26-film history of the DC Universe Original Movie franchise.

Batman: The Killing Joke, one of the best-selling graphic novels in history, tells the tale of The Joker’s origin story – from his humble beginnings as a struggling comic, to his fateful encounter with Batman that changes both of their lives forever. It also contains some of the most controversial material in comics history. The graphic novel won two Eisner Awards and was written by Alan Moore 28  years ago. It is consistently a top selling graphic novel, with this film being greenlit in 2013 and announced in July 2015.

Actors Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill reprise their Batman: The Animated Series roles as Batman and The Joker, respectively.

Animation visionary Bruce Timm guided the DC Universe Original Movie franchise for its initial 16 films, then returned last summer with his own original story, Justice League: Gods & Monsters. Timm takes the reigns once again for Batman: The Killing Joke, reuniting a trio of actors (Kevin Conroy, Mark Hamill & Tara Strong) from the game-changing Batman: The Animated Series cast to add even greater reverence to this heralded tale. Recognizing the fans’ dedication to the highly acclaimed graphic novel, Timm has worked meticulously to accurately maintain the intense adult content of The Killing Joke.

At this time, there are no plans for an edited, PG-13 version of the film according to Warner Bros. announcement.

Batman: The Killing Joke also features the voices of Tara Strong, as Barbara Gordon and Ray Wise as Commissioner Gordon.

The film’s World Premiere will take place at Comic-Con International this summer, and see a subsequent release in 2016 on Blu-ray Combo Pack, DVD and Digital HD. Tat relase date will be announced at a later time along with what other content we can expect.

Cartoon Network Announces Justice League Action

JLA_Poster_v3b[1]The world’s greatest Super Heroes return to television in Justice League Action, an all-new quarter-hour animated series from Warner Bros. Animation coming soon to Cartoon Network.

Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman lead the DC Comics Super Heroes against their most infamous foes in adventures packed with relentless thrills, fun and action. No need to wait for the good stuff to start, each eleven-minute episode jumps in with lightning-paced action and heroics. Whether defending the Earth, facing invaders from space, or battling the bizarre forces of magic, the always-rotating team of Justice League heroes, are up to any challenge. The new series is the first DC Comics-based franchise to launch on Cartoon Network since the highly-successful Teen Titan Go!, which in 2015 ranked as a Top 5 animated series among Kids 2-11, 6-11 and all key Boys. Teen Titans Go! also ranks as Cartoon Network’s #1 property for cross-platform video plays and on VOD.

Justice League Action marks the return of Kevin Conroy (Batman: The Animated Series), beloved by fans worldwide as one of the most iconic voices of Batman, to a weekly-animated television series. The series will also deliver an all-star lineup of regular and guest cast voices, including Mark Hamill as Joker, James Woods as Lex Luthor, Diedrich Bader as Booster Gold and many more portraying your favorite DC Comics Super Heroes and Super-Villains. Sam Register (Teen Titans Go!) serves as executive producer with Butch Lukic (Justice League, Batman Beyond), Alan Burnett (Batman: The Animated Series) and Jim Krieg (Green Lantern: The Animated Series) serving as producers.

Mark Hamill Says Romney Was Disrespectful, Patronizing and a Bully

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Actor Mark Hamill joined Cenk Uygur, Jayar Jackson and Michael Shure to break down President Obama’s and Mitt Romney’s debate styles on Current TV‘s The Young Turks with Cenk Uygur.

Hamill said:

I love the idea of an open debate like in France …, but it’s almost like harassment. The president’s trying to get his answer together and (Romney interrupts) because it’s not coming fast enough for the CEO. … He then repeats the question over and over. It’s bullying, to me, of the highest degree.

Advice for Governor Romney, last time someone pissed off Hamill, he got some friends together, started intergalactic civil war and toppled an authoritarian regime. Imagine what he can do to you and your Bain buddies….

(h/t Bryan Young and Big Shiny Robot)

Around the Tubes

New York Comic Con is here, yay!  Coverage will get ramped up of the show, but the best to do is follow us on Twitter to get real time updates.  While you wait for me to start twittering away, here’s the news you might have missed.

Around the Blogs:

Bleeding Cool – Ann Nocenti Takes On Green Arrow Beginning With Issue #7And DC brings in another female writer.

Kotaku – The Next Superman Video Game is ExcellentWasn’t the last game supposed to be good?

Kotaku – Batman: Arkham City’s Single-player Catwoman Content Demands Buying New or Buying a ‘VIP Pass’ – Well, I was going to buy the game, guess I’ll have to buy it new….

Con Coverage:

MTV Geek – Hasbro NYCC Exclusive Compound Hulk Review

MTV Geek – Buy A Cool T-Shirt, Support The Fight Against Breast Cancer at NYCC

The Beat – NYCC 2011: Day One: Preview Day

The Mary Sue – Five Things to Remember About New York Comic Con

Comics Alliance – New York Comic-Con Preview: What To Do On Saturday

MTV Geek – Hasbro Unveils Avengers Movie Figures Pre-NYCC!

MTV Geek – The Gamer’s Guide to New York Comic Con

The Beat – NYCC 11 kicks off

Bleeding Cool – NYCC Debut: NOBODIES, Volume 1 by DRAWMORE INC.

Queens Chronicle – Library hosts Queens’ very first Comic-Con

MTV Geek – Mark Hamill Joins New-Gen as Creative Consultant… And There’s a Movie – NYCC News

Bleeding Cool – NYCC Debut: Buffalo Speedway by Yehudi Mercado

Around the Tubes Reviews:

CBR – Shade #1

CBR – Ultimate Comics Spider-Man #3

Around the Tubes

I just feel like I need to plug it once again, if you haven’t yet, check out Sunday’s GP Radio with special guest Ron Marz.  It was a hell of a show.  While you’re listening to that, here’s the news you might have missed.

Around the Blogs:

CBLDF – Craig Thompson Helps CBLDF Bring in $4,700 During APE! – Fantastic to see a great cause to bring in some cash (it’s not easy to do that right now in this economy).  See below how you can help.

CBLDF – CBLDF Auctions Heat Up – Pony up some cash for a great cause….

Con Coverage:

MTV Geek – Mark Hamill and New-Gen Team Up at NYCC

The Beat – NYCC: White Space announces featured attendees: Doctorow, Sullivan, Tanz, Mason

Around the Tubes Reviews:

ICv2 – The Book of Human Insects

Giant Fire Breathing Robot – Creepy Archives, Volume Eleven

MTV Geek – Dark Horse Advance Reviews: Joss Whedon’s Buffy The Vampire Slayer Season 9 #2 & Tom Morello’s Orchid #1

World Premiere Of “Sushi Girl” Trailer At July 22nd Comic-Con Panel With Cast Led By Mark Hamill, Noah Hathaway & Tony Todd

Official Press Release

World Premiere of “Sushi Girl” Trailer, A Feast For the Senses, at July 22nd Comic-Con Panel

Assembly Line, LLC & Level Up Productions Bring Their Dark Crime Thriller “Sushi Girl” & Legendary Cast Led by Mark Hamill, Noah Hathaway & Tony Todd To San Diego

(LOS ANGELES, CA—July 12th, 2011) Revenge is a dish best served cold. “Sushi Girl,” truly a diabolical treat, stars a virtual who’s-who of cult icons in filmmaker Kern Saxton’s directorial feature film debut: Mark Hamill (Star Wars), Noah Hathaway (The NeverEnding Story), Tony Todd (Candyman), Andy Mackenzie (Shoot ‘Em Up), James Duval (Donnie Darko), David Dastmalchian (The Dark Knight), Michael Biehn (The Terminator), Danny Trejo (Machete), Sonny Chiba (Kill Bill Vol. 1), Cortney Palm (Superbad), and Jeff Fahey (Grindhouse).

Directly following the world premiere of the film’s trailer, “Sushi Girl” cast (Hamill, Hathaway, Todd, Mackenzie, Duval, Dastmalchian, Palm and Chiba) will participate in a Q&A at their Comic-Con Panel on Friday, July 22nd at the San Diego Convention Center in Room 25ABC from 7:00pm – 8:00pm. Director/writer/producer Kern Saxton (Deader Living Through Chemistry), producers Neal Fischer (Shotgun Diaries) & Suren M. Seron (Forever Plaid), and writer/producer Destin Pfaff (Millionaire Matchmaker) will accompany the cast. The film will also have a booth located at Exhibit table J5 in the Exhibit Hall in front of concession stand B.

“Sushi Girl” follows Fish (Hathaway) on his first night of freedom after having spent the last six years in jail keeping his mouth shut not only about the robbery he helped commit, but about his co-conspirators as well. The four men he protected celebrate his freedom with a lavish dinner, comprised of an array of sushi—served off the naked body of a beautiful young woman. The sushi girl appears catatonic, trained to ignore everything in the room—even as things become more dangerous.

Learn more about “Sushi Girl” by visiting the website: http://www.sushigirlmovie.com/

Follow the film on Twitter at @SushiGirlMovie for updates as well as the latest whereabouts of the cast and their Comic-Con Sushi Truck for meet and greet opportunities.