Tag Archives: lilah sturges

Lumberjanes Shows us the Shape of Friendship for Free Comic Book Day

BOOM! Studios has announced Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship FBCD Special, an all-new comic book arriving in comic shops worldwide on Free Comic Book Day which takes place May 4th, 2019.

Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship FBCD Special exclusively presents the first chapter of the all new original graphic novel reuniting the acclaimed Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass team of writer Lilah Sturges and artist polterink. When the Lumberjanes discover the hiding place of a group of magical creatures called Pookas, they think they’ve found new friends. But what they don’t know is that the Pookas are tired of hiding, and they’ve found the perfect way to join the outside world…by impersonating the ‘Janes themselves and taking over Camp! To reclaim their identities, the ’Janes will have to work together to remember who they really are…and to help another group of friends accept themselves, too, in a story about looking inside yourself and learning to love who you meet there.

Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship FBCD Special

Your First Look at Lev Grossman’s The Magicians: Alice’s Story

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at The Magicians: Alice’s Story, an all-new original graphic novel hardcover set in the world of the acclaimed book trilogy by Lev Grossman, from writer Lilah Sturges(, rising star artist Pius Bak and featuring a cover by Steve Morris.

The Magicians is an award-winning, New York Times bestselling adult fantasy novel series created by Lev Grossman, which has become a worldwide pop culture phenomenon and inspired a hit television series on Syfy, whose fourth season will premiere later this year. Originally published in 2009, The Magicians introduced readers to Brakebills College for Magical Pedagogy, which boasts a prestigious and dangerously difficult curriculum, famous and infamous alumni, and a record of only… a few deaths per graduating class.

Debuting in July 10, 2019, The Magicians: Alice’s Story expands the mythology of The Magicians, the first novel in the series trilogy, through the perspective of the character Alice Quinn before she joins Brakebills and embarks on an epic journey into the magical land of Fillory.

Alice is a brilliant and naturally talented magician who grew up fully aware of the hidden world of magic but whose well-versed parents refused to teach her how to make use of it. So what is an insanely gifted young genius with no guidance or encouragement to do except teach herself? Which is how she winds up a top student at Brakebills College. Alice is at first meek and cripplingly shy until she breaks out of her shell to face deadly magical creatures, devastating heartbreak, and the hard lessons of a magical world where even well-intentioned actions can have brutal and deadly consequences.

Eisner Award-nominated writer Lilah Sturges will be in attendance as a guest of BOOM! Studios at ALA Midwinter 2019 in Seattle, Washington. She will be available for signings both Saturday and Sunday, 1/26-1/28, as well as a guest on the BOOM! Studios: Discover Yours panel on Monday, 1/28, where she will join some of the most acclaimed voices in graphic fiction today for a discussion on the diverse, award-winning imprints of BOOM! Studios, Archaia, BOOM! Box and KaBOOM!.

The Magicians: Alice's Story

Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship is a New Original Graphic Novel out in November 2019

BOOM! Studios has announced Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship, an all-new original graphic novel reuniting the highly praised Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass team of writer Lilah Sturges and artist polterink.
Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship will be available in stores in November 2019.

The Lumberjanes are at it again, making trouble and making friends, all at the same time. This time their adventurous rambles take them deep into the woods, to the hiding place of a group of magical creatures known as Pookas. The ‘Janes are delighted to meet these magical beings and make new friends. But what they don’t know is that these isolated magical creatures are actually master shapeshifters and just itching for the chance to see what human life is all about. Everything quickly goes awry as the Pookas decide to try life in the ‘Janes shoes and end up turning Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady-Types upside down. Mal, Ripley, Molly, April & Jo will have to work together, using the power of friendship, in order to reclaim their lives and teach the Pookas that sometimes your best self is your true self. 

Lumberjanes: The Shape of Friendship

Rick and Morty Presents Returns For A Second Volume!

The renowned one-shot quarterly series, Rick and Morty Presents is back for a second volume, with four new, oversized single issues on the horizon including Jerry, Mr. Meeseeks, The Flesh Curtainsand Unity. The comic series tells four standalone stories, each focused on a different Rick and Mortycharacter from the critically-acclaimed Adult Swim show that follows sociopathic genius scientist, Rick Sanchez, who drags his inherently timid grandson on insanely dangerous adventures across the universe.

Rick and Morty Presents: Jerry #1 

(W) Ryan Ferrier, (A) CJ Cannon, (C) Joshua Perez, (CA) A: CJ Cannon and Joshua Perez, B: Sina Grace

Rick and Morty Presents is back by popular demand! This very special issue focuses on everyone’s favorite character, Jerry. Jerry’s wisely blaming all his marital issues on his Dad-bod. When he goes to Rick for a quick fix, things go so poorly, it’s… demonic. Written by Ryan Ferrier (Batman/Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Regular Show, D4VE, and more!), with series artists CJ Cannon and Joshua Perez! Features a variant cover by Sina Grace.

Rick and Morty Presents: Mr. Meeseeks #1

(W) James Asmus and Jim Festante, (A) CJ Cannon, (C) Joshua Perez, (CA) A: CJ Cannon and Joshua Perez, B: Sarah Stern

A message from Mr. Meeseeks: You ASKED for it, and we’re obligated to deliver! That’s what Meeseeks DO, after all! But WAIT… who the heck asked us to find the MEANING OF LIFE?!? THIS IS ONLY A 30 PAGE STAND-ALONE STORY!! I’m Mr. Meeseeks and this will not end well!

Rick and Morty Presents:  The Flesh Curtains #1

(W) Lilah Sturges, (A) CJ Cannon, (C) Joshua Perez, (CA) A: CJ Cannon and Joshua Perez, B: Marie Enger

Learn the true origins of THE FLESH CURTAINS, Rick’s rock band with BirdPerson and Squanchy! Booed off of every stage, they consider giving up… until Rick invents a machine capable of writing songs people can’t resist. But when their multi-dimensional concert goes awry, Rick suddenly finds himself in massive debt to a ruthless alien loan shark. Will Rick do the safe thing and play the music guaranteed to make the band a success, or do the insane thing and play the music guaranteed to alienate almost everyone in order to impress his favorite musician? 

Rick and Morty Presents: Unity #1

(W) Tini Howard, (A) CJ Cannon, (C) Joshua Perez, (CA) A: CJ Cannon and Joshua Perez, B: Sina Grace

It takes a special kind of madness to capture and imprison Rick Sanchez — the kind of madness only an ex can deliver.Unity wants to make a play to take over the galaxy, and she’ll need the best (and worst) of her exes in her clutches to do it. And Rick wants his Party Naked t-shirt back, she stole it when they broke up. 

The first issue of the second series of Rick and Morty™ Presents is scheduled for release March 13, 2019, with the subsequent issues releasing in June, September, and November.

Lilah Sturges Goes on Tour this Winter to Promote Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass

BOOM! Studios has announced a winter book tour in support of Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass, the historic first original graphic novel in the history of the series that’s sold over a million copies worldwide. Eisner Award-nominated writer Lilah Sturges will visit book stores, libraries, and comic shops across the United States to meet with fans and sign copies of this landmark release.

The Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass Winter Book Tour stops include:

  • Saturday, November 24th, Houston: 1:00-3:00pm at Brazos Bookstore
  • Sunday, November 25th, Los Angeles: 5:00-7:00pm at Chevalier’s Bookstore
  • Monday, November 26th, Los Angeles: 5:00-7:00pm at East County LA Public Library
  • Wednesday, November 28th, Portland: 5:00-6:00pm at Books With Pictures
  • Thursday, November 29th, Seattle: 6:00-8:00pm at Outsiders Comics & Geek Boutique
  • Friday, November 30th, Minneapolis: 7:00-8:30pm at Barnes & Noble Minneapolis
  • Saturday, December 1st, Chicago: 4:00-6:00pm at Challengers Comics + Conversation

Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass, from Sturges and rising-star artist polterink, features a stunning cover by Alexa Sharpe and presents an all-new story at Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s camp for Hardcore Lady-Types when Mal, Ripley, Molly, April, and Jo become separated during an orienteering outing thanks to a mysterious compass. While Molly begins to feel more and more insecure about the effect of her relationship with Mal on the other girls, a lonely woman explorer is trying to steal the compass…with the help of some weirdly polite automaton butlers, of course.

Review: Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass

Lumberjanes is an award winning comic series beloved by critics and fans and in the works to be a major motion picture! Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass is the first original graphic novel spinning out of the monthly comic series written by Lilah Sturges and art by Polterink.

Get your copy in comic shops today and in book stores October 23. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass SC

Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass SC

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Lilah Sturges
Artist: polterink
Cover Artist: Alexa Sharpe
Letterer: Jim Campbell
Price: $14.99

Eisner Award-nominated writer Lilah Sturges (Fables, Thor: Season One) teams with artist polterink (Enough Space for Everyone Else) for the first Lumberjanes graphic novel in a story about finding your way and navigating life, love, and a literal forest.

When the ‘Janes start to become separated during an orienteering outing thanks to a mysterious compass, Molly becomes more and more insecure about the effect of her relationship with Mal on the other girls.

Meanwhile, a lonely woman explorer is trying to steal the compass, with the help of some weirdly polite automaton butlers.

Lev Grossman’s The Magicians Comes To BOOM!

BOOM! Studios has announced it has acquired the comic book and graphic novel publishing license to The Magicians, the award-winning, New York Times bestselling adult fantasy novel series created by Lev Grossman, which has become a worldwide pop culture phenomenon and inspired a hit television series on Syfy, whose fourth season will premiere in 2019.

Originally published in 2009, The Magicians introduces readers to Brakebills College for Magical Pedagogy, which boasts a prestigious and dangerously difficult curriculum, famous and infamous alumni, and a record of only…a few deaths per graduating class.

The first release in this partnership will be The Magicians: Alice’s Story, an all-new original graphic novel hardcover set in the world of the book trilogy by Grossman, from acclaimed writer Lilah Sturges, rising star artist Pius Bak and featuring a cover by Steve Morris.

Debuting in July 2019, The Magicians: Alice’s Story expands the mythology of The Magicians, the first novel in the series trilogy, through the perspective of lead character Alice Quinn before she joins Brakebills and embarks on an  epic journey in the magical land of Fillory.

Alice is manifestly brilliant, and she’s always known that magic is real. During her years at Brakebills Alice rises to the top of her class, falls in love with Quentin Coldwater, and witnesses a horrifically powerful magical creature called the Beast invade their dimension. Soon after graduation, Alice and Quentin set their sights on the idyllic setting from their favorite children’s books, Fillory. In Fillory, magic flows like a river but even with talking animals, enchanted items, and the chance to become king and queen of a magical land in the offing, nothing is what it seems and something far darker lies in wait behind the spellbinding facade. Now fans will learn untold secrets of Alice’s journey, the world of The Magicians, and will find answers to some of their biggest questions.

FlameCon 2018: The Panels

To go along with an environment free of toxicity and full of heartfelt enthusiasm to go with the water stations, pronoun stickers, and the best press lounge in my five years of covering conventions, Flame Con also had nuanced panels on a variety of comics and pop culture topics with panelists, who represented a broad spectrum of voices and experiences. I attended three panels at the con: “Fan Activists Assemble!” about practical ways members of fandom can effect sociopolitical change, “Fangirl… But then Make It Fashion” an entertaining, yet wide ranging panel about the larger cultural context of character designs and costumes, and “Telling All Ages Queer Stories” about LGBTQ representation in all ages comics.

Jay Edidin and Elana Levin

Fan Activists Assemble! (Saturday)

Fan Activists Assemble” was hosted by Elana Levin of Graphic Policy Radio, who also trains digital organizes and is a new media mentor and also featured a guest appearance from journalist and podcaster Jay Edidin of Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men fame. Pop culture has always been intertwined with her activism beginning with her love for the X-Men comics, and her current passion is bridging those two worlds via the tool of the Internet. She also talked about how social media and the ability for protests to “trend” has helped the way they are viewed in society unlike in the past when protesters were arrested or beat up by the police, and their narrative was shaped by traditional news media.

As Stephen Duncombe said, “Scratch an activist, and you’re apt to find a fan.” At the beginning of her talk, Elana Levin stated many strengths that fans can bring to the world of activism, including community building, thinking beyond the world we exist in, and practical skills like art, writing, social media posting, and even meme and GIF making. Fans don’t have to reinvent the wheel and form their own organization and can bring their talents and fresh POV to existing organizations from larger ones like GLAAD or the ACLU to smaller, local ones.

Next, Levin brought in Jay Edidin as a case study of fan activism when he confronted Dark Horse Comics for having healthcare that excluded any coverage “…related to gender dysphoria and transition” while claiming to be an LGBTQ friendly company and featuring the Pride flag on their Twitter profile. Edidin used to be an employee of Dark Horse Comics and has been a journalist since 2007. He couldn’t go public for a while because his ex-husband worked for Dark Horse, but seeing the company’s Pride Day tweet led to him confronting the company. With the help of comic book creator, Mariah McCourt, an open letter stating a demand for expanding Dark Horse’s healthcare coverage was drafted and signed by many comics professionals. Dark Horse changed their policy a day before the letter went public.

Elana Levin showed that this action fit an effective four part organizational strategy. There was the goal, which was for Dark Horse Comics to have trans inclusive healthcare, the target was upper management because they have the power to effect change in the company, the “ask” was for comics creators to sign the open letter, and the message was for Dark Horse to basically put their money where their mouth is and support the LGBTQ community through their actions and not just through rainbow logos. Jay Edidin added that using the letter format was important because comics creators are vulnerable on their own.

Later, in the panel, Elana Levin gave examples of how social media and hashtags are able to shape discussions like the conversation around having an Asian American Iron Fist that cast a shadow over Finn Jones’ eventual casting as him in the Marvel Netflix show. Even if this didn’t end in a “win”, it started a conversation, and Marvel later did some race bent casting by having Tessa Thompson play Valkyrie in Thor Ragnarok and Zazie Beetz play Domino in Deadpool 2. Levin also laid out practical rules for hashtags, including keeping them short and simple and only using two per tweet. An example was using #WakandatheVote and #BlackPanther in a tweet about registering voters who were in line for the Black Panther film. She also reiterated the importance of having a specific goal, targeting decision makers, and having a clear ask in online activism using the Harry Potter Alliance’s efforts of having the franchise’s chocolate frogs made with fair trade chocolate and opposing North Carolina’s anti-trans HB2 “bathroom bill”.

The panel concluded with Levin engaging the audience in their own activism brainstorming session with an audience member discussing the need for more asexual representation in pop culture and comics and using FlameCon as a venue to make a case for this.  This led to a side discussion about the importance of fun in activism and helping keep people engaged in cause from free pizza and T-shirts to crafting GIFs like one of the Dora Milaje from Black Panther metaphorically confronting ICE.

Little Corvus, Yoshi Yoshitani, Aaron Reese, Terry Blas, Jen Bartel, Irene Koh

“Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion!” (Saturday)

“Fan Activists Assemble” was immediately followed by the “Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion” panel, which was moderated by Geeks Out’s Aaron Reese. The panelists were comic book creators Little Corvus (Deja Brew), Yoshi Yoshitani (Jem and the Holograms), Terry Blas (Dead Weight), Irene Koh (The Legend of Korra), and Jen Bartel (America). After breaking the ice with a fun discussion about favorite candies, Reese started out by asking about the difference between cultural inspiration and appropriation in character outfits. Bartel stressed the importance of “cultural and historical context” in fashion while Koh gave the positive example of the Bangladeshi character she introduced in the Legend of Korra comics as well as time periods where there was “cultural exchange” between European and Asian cultures.

A negative example given by Koh was Queen Amidala’s outfits in Star Wars, which she said were inspired by North Asian and Mongolian fashions and demeaned the original culture. Reese added that Padme had dreadlocks in a deleted scene from Revenge of the Sith, which led to the realization that most of the design and fashion choices in Star Wars are cultural appropriation beginning with the “white guys dressed like ninjas” that Terry Blas used to describe the Jedi Knights. Blas said that unlike Star Wars which exoticizes or “others” its Asian influences, Avatar: The Last Airbender respected Asian cultures even though it wasn’t created by Asians and was superhero stories for people who didn’t have superheroes that looked like them.

The discussion then turned to the popular video game Overwatch where Yoshi Yoshitani criticized the character Doomfist, whose map and character is supposedly inspired by Nigerian culture, but he is half naked, has tusks, and looks like the creators never did research on actual Nigerian fashion. She said that Hanzo and Symmetra had good designs while Irene Koh poked fun at Hanzo’s obsession with honor. Aaron Reese said that the issue with Overwatch was that the game designers focused on environments instead of character looks.

The next topic was body positivity, and Reese gave a shout out to Rose Quartz and the curviness and softness of characters in Steven Universe as well as the strength of Antiope from the Wonder Woman film and the other athletic “hunter/gatherer” Amazon women. His bad example was Psylocke, and a slide showed an example from both the comics and Olivia Munn playing her in X-Men: Apocalypse. Little Corvus made a good point that the difficulty that the panel had thinking of examples was a big problem in pop culture. Terry Blas used the example of his comic Dead Weight about a murder mystery at a fat camp where the characters are drawn as fat in different ways that reflects their character instead of just having the same body shape.

Bartel said that she had done covers for the character Faith from Valiant Comics and liked her as a representative of body positivity, but said that she wished she could redesign her costume into something that the superheroine would actually wear. In connection with this, Blas said that some male comic book artists spend hours of research getting a jet engine part right, but don’t consider fashion in their work. This led to a discussion about female superhero body types with Yoshitani saying that there was pressure on female superheroes to be perfect for everyone. Irene Koh said that she wished superhero artists took inspiration from ESPN: The Body Issue, which shows how different kinds of athletes have different body types.

Other topics discussed by the panel, included gender expression and how this was handled better in anime than in Western comics with Little Corvus making an excellent point about how Mulan could be non-binary as she explores different gender presentations in the 1998 Disney film. Another topic was color washing where Reese and Koh strongly criticized writers who described people of color like food.  The panel ended on a positive note with Reese, Blas, and Little Corvus talking about how the Runaways from the Hulu TV show and America were good representations of teenage fashion and their clothing choices made them seem like they were real people.

This panel reinforced the idea that careful attention to a character’s heritage even through something like a piece of clothing makes for a richer reading or viewing experience, and it also challenged me to look at media that I have taken for granted for instances of cultural appropriation. Star Wars was a big one.

Steve Fox, Chad Sell, Barbara Perez Marquez, Molly Ostertag, Lilah Sturges, James Tynion IV

“Telling All Ages Queer Stories” (Sunday)

The final panel I attended was on Sunday and was about all ages comics created by LGBTQ creators. The panel was moderated by Paste’s Steve Foxe and featured Chad Sell (Cardboard Kingdom), Barbara Perez Marquez (Cardboard Kingdom), Molly Ostertag (Witch Boy), Lilah Sturges (Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass), and James Tynion IV (Justice League Dark)Foxe began by asking what kind of LGBTQ characters whether positive or negative the panelists came across when they were young adults.

Tynion said that he mainly read superhero comics growing up where there wasn’t a lot of LGBTQ representation except for homophobic jokes and said he connected to the X-Men as well as webcomics with gay characters when he was in middle school. Sell said that an issue of Superman from the early 1990s scared him into possibly not coming out when two gay men were chased out of town and then rescued by Superman. The point he got from this story is that if he came out as gay, he would be forced to run away. Sturges’ first experience with a trans character in media was The Crying Game, but she said until Lana Wachowski made her 2012 speech that trans characters were portrayed as either pathetic or deceivers. She said that she enjoyed writing Jo as a happy trans kid in Lumberjanes. Perez Marquez talked about how she didn’t grow up with LGBTQ characters, but did connect with queer coded” characters like Spinelli from Recess.

Foxe’s next question was that in writing stories about LGBT youth that the panelists drew on their own childhood or an idealized one. James Tynion said that his science fiction series The Woods about a school being transported to a different planet drew on his own experiences as an out queer high schooler while his series The Backstagers about theater kids was more idealized. Molly Ostertag said that she wasn’t out as a lesbian in high school, and her upcoming queer high school girl romance was a vision of what she wanted as a teenager. However, she didn’t want to talk down to teens or avoid the realities of homophobia. Lilah Sturges said she felt a moment of doubt writing about the happy romance between Mal and Molly in Lumberjanes, but said she was able to write it because Lumberjanes like their relationship is a true utopian vision. Barbara Perez Marquez’s work on Cardboard Kingdom was more true to her life as a young queer Dominican girl while her webcomic Order of the Belfry was pure wish fulfillment about lady knights who kiss.

The discussion shifted to queer content filtering and pushback about LGBTQ content from editors and publishers. Tynion made a good point about how companies realized there was money in queer audiences and said he got some pushback in his superhero books and relatively none in his all ages comics for BOOM! Ostertag said it was easier to “push the envelope” in regards to LGBTQ content in comics versus television where she rarely interacted with the people who pulled the strings. So, it was much easier for her to explore gender roles in Witch Boy where a boy wants to try girl magic and not boy magic and harder to have a same gender couple holding hands in the background of an animated show. Sell and Perez Marquez talked about the “sneaky” representation of Cardboard Kingdom which are stories geared to 9-12 year olds and don’t have labels, but do explore things like same sex attraction and gender nonconformity.

Then, the panel basically transformed into a pure celebration of LGBTQ YA stories. James Tynion talked about how in Backstagers that he began with subtle representation and then had two of his leads, Jory and Hunter, become boyfriends by the end of the series. Lilah Sturges said that she enjoyed writing a pre-teen trans coming of age story in Lumberjanes because it’s not sexual and is a pure statement about what does it mean to have a gender. She also revealed something adorable that will make fans of the series smile when they read her graphic novel. Chad Sell talked about how he chose writers for The Cardboard Kingdom based on their own personal experiences that they could bring to the “neighborhood” of stories.

The panel ended in Q and A where an audience member asked about how the creators as adults captured the voices of today’s young people in their comics. Barbara Perez Marquez made the excellent suggestion of having kids or teens like in a public library’s graphic novel or anime club to beta read their scripts and give notes on what they liked about the scripts.

Your First Look at Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass

BOOM! Studios is spotlighting the best YA comic books and graphic novels, with a first look at Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass, the historic first original graphic novel in the history of the series that’s sold over a million copies worldwide from Eisner Award-nominated writer Lilah Sturges and rising-star artist polterink.

Arriving in stores October 2018, Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass features a stunning cover by Alexa Sharpe and presents an all-new story at Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s camp for Hardcore Lady-Types when Mal, Ripley, Molly, April & Jo become separated during an orienteering outing thanks to a mysterious compass. While Molly begins to feel more and more insecure about the effect of her relationship with Mal on the other girls, a lonely woman explorer is trying to steal the compass…with the help of some weirdly polite automaton butlers, of course.

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