Tag Archives: jeremy barlow

The Original Predator Screenplay Gets a Comic Adaptation

Before there was Predator, there was Hunters. Now, Dark Horse Comics and Twentieth Century Fox invite you to experience that story in Predator: The Original Screenplay. Adapted from James E. Thomas and John C. Thomas’ 1984 screenplay Hunters, writer Jeremy Barlow, artist Patrick Blaine, and inker Andy Owens bring the original story to brutal life.

In Predator: The Original Screenplay, a team of military specialists are on a rescue mission in the jungles of Central America. The details of the mission are classified, but the team soon uncovers a trail of lies and deceit. Something is observing them—tracking their every move. The hunt has begun!

Predator: The Original Screenplay #1 (of five) goes on sale June 10, 2020.

Predator: The Original Screenplay

Alien and Predator Clash Again in Thicker Than Blood

Starting this December, a terrifying new series will once again pit the iconic Aliens and Predators against each other. From Dark Horse Comics comes Alien vs. Predator: Thicker Than Blood, written by Jeremy Barlow, illustrated by Doug Wheatly, and lettered by Michael Heisler, with the cover illustrated by Chun Lo

Alien vs. Predator: Thicker Than Blood kicks off when Predators board a luxury charter spaceship, unleashing a path of terror and bloodshed. An adolescent girl and her younger “brother” are the last to survive and begin a cat-and-mouse chase with the attackers. They hope for an escape, but they haven’t counted on the Alien . . .

Alien vs. Predator: Thicker Than Blood #1 (of four) goes on sale December 11, 2019.

Alien vs. Predator: Thicker Than Blood #1

Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management and Dark Horse Comics Team Up to Teach Tsunami Preparedness

Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management and Dark Horse Comics team up to prepare for the Great Oregon ShakeOut on October 20 and introduce Without Warning: Tsunami, a new comic touting tsunami preparedness. The 16-page comic strip sequence chronicles a mother/daughter camping trip on the Oregon coast when an earthquake and resulting tsunami strike. The duo stays safe and helps others in danger.

Without Warning: Tsunami is the second time that the partners have come together to collaborate on bringing preparedness messaging to youth. In 2013, OEM’s Geologic Hazards Program Coordinator Althea Rizzo approached Dark Horse with a proposal. An avid comic book fan herself, Rizzo knew that it was a good way to reach a new target audience. In August 2014, Without Warning was released, telling a story of an Oregon teen who reunites with her family after a major Cascadia Earthquake.

Rizzo came up with both stories which were scripted and illustrated by Dark Horse team members Jeremy Barlow and David Hahn.

Oregon is located in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a 600-hundred mile earthquake fault stretching from offshore Northern California to Southern British Columbia.  According to scientists and other experts, a large 9.0 or higher earthquake could strike Oregon at any time.

Without Warning: Tsunami is available online. Printed copies can be obtained through local county emergency management offices.

without-warning-tsunami

10 Questions with Jeremy Barlow

Barlow Headshot02 smallWriter Jeremy Barlow has had a varied and interesting comic writing career covering some big franchises like Kult, Mass Effect, Dethklok, R.I.P.D. and now Hawken Genesis out this week from Archaia.

We got a chance to chat with Jeremy about how his career started, what it’s like to write all those comics and a bit about video games.

Jeremy is the latest victim of Graphic Policy’s “10 Questions”…

You can follow Jeremy on Facebook and Twitter.

Graphic Policy: How did you get involved in the comic book industry?

Jeremy Barlow: Dark Horse Comics hired me as an assistant editor right out of college. I’d just earned an English degree and was moving to Oregon from another state, and happened to time my query as DH had an opening in their editorial department. A few months prior to that I had a couple of great meetings with senior editors Diana Schutz and Chris Warner at Comic-Con in San Diego, which led to a job interview back in Milwaukee. The rest is history.

GP: Do you read comics growing up? Do you read them now?

JB: I sure did. I was buying comics before I knew how to read, off the grocery store spinner racks. It was love at first sight with ROM: Spaceknight and it grew outward from there. I’m still an avid comics reader, though my tastes have changed—I read more manga and European material than I do the superhero stuff—but I’m still a sucker for some good, original American science-fiction.

My buying habits have changed, too. Save for the occasional hardcover collection, I purchase everything digitally now, through my iPad, or I borrow it from the local library. Which cuts down on the clutter.

GP: How did you come to work with Archaia on this project?

JB: Archaia Publisher Mike Kennedy invited me. He and I go way back and have worked together on a number of different projects over the years. One of the first Dark Horse series I assisted on was Lone Wolf 2100, written by Mike and illustrated by Francisco Ruiz Velasco, who also drew HAWKEN’s opening chapter. It’s all come full circle.

Archaia’s been on my radar for years, too—they partner with incredible talent and produce the best looking books in the industry. I always planned to work with them on something eventually, and HAWKEN’s timing happened to be perfect.

GP:  The graphic novel is also tied into a video game. Do you play video games yourself? If yes, some favorites?

JB: I do, but not as much as I’d like. Making time for it is difficult, but when I do play I go deep. I’m obsessively thorough and will chase every last side mission and achievement I can follow, losing weeks at a time to this, if I’m not careful. So I’m very deliberate about what and when I play. Fallout 3 was a glorious black hole, and I spent months in that wasteland. Months.

My favorite games are story-driven, with a strong narrative or unique point-of-view. Red Dead Redemption was amazing, and probably my favorite game of the last few years. The Mass Effect trilogy gave me chills, and I still hop on the ME3 multiplayer now and then.  I just started BioShock Infinite and am having a blast with that so far.

GP: Hawken Genesis acts as a prequel to the video game. How much freedom did you have when crafting the story?

JB: The story was pretty well mapped by the time I came onboard. The game developers and the transmedia guys had already created an astonishingly thorough world bible, and I plugged into that. My job initially was to give it all a unique flavor, and to help them set up what’s to follow.

GP: There’s a who’s who of artists involved with this as well. Did you find yourself writing differently based on the artist? Did you even know who was handling each part?

JB: I didn’t always know who was illustrating which sections, but Archaia was good about keeping me updated as things fell into place. In general, I try to write for every artist with whom I’m collaborating. They’re the partnership’s visual thinkers, and I’m conscious not to dictate panel layouts or camera angles, unless an image needs a specific delivery. My job isn’t to direct, it’s to convey the story’s themes and emotions in a way that gets us all aiming at the same target. If every member of the team is invested, if we’re all working together, the results can be magic.

GP: One of the things I really enjoyed about it, is the breaks between the chapters where there’s a cell phone, tablet or computer screen that has more info on this world. How did that idea come about?

JB: Those are great, aren’t they? That concept was pre-loaded prior to my involvement, and it was an incredibly appealing and efficient way to both build the world and to convey a lot of information in a short space. Joe LeFavi deserves a lot of credit for the idea and the execution.

GP: I know you’ve written for many genres, with Kult, Mass Effect, Dethklok, R.I.P.D. and now Hawken Genesis, any one a favorite of yours? How do these different settings affect how you approach a story?

JB: Yeah, I’ve been really fortunate to play in so many fantastic worlds, and I try not to get involved with projects that don’t have a personal appeal. Writing something you love is hard enough; writing something you don’t care about is a total drag.

The trick with writing licensed or franchise stories is to speak in their voices so convincingly that readers can hear the characters and feel the worlds, while interweaving your own perspective and ideas into the DNA. If done right, the writer kind of disappears into the process. It’s a good tool to have in the box, and I’ve learned to use it well, but if you’re not careful it can keep you from developing your own identity.

It’s only been in the last year or so that I’ve come to understand who I am as a writer.  KULT, for example, was a spectacularly failed experiment through which I learned that I can’t write darkness without heart. I need to balance the sinister with the warmly absurd. At the time, watching KULT come together and seeing where I went wrong was hard to take—because in this business, you’re failing in public—but with some time and distance I recognized that I needed that to happen to get some things out of my system. What I’m calling a failure was the most important and educational step I’ve taken so far.

In terms of genre affecting approach, I try to come at every project answering the same questions: What do I have to say about this, and how can I make that as interesting and exciting as possible? What kind of book would I spend my own money to read? Beyond that, genre really doesn’t matter. A good story should transcend the conventions.

It’s hard to choose a favorite, but R.I.P.D. probably best represents my own style and sensibilities, so my heart holds a special place for it.

GP: What types of hurdles have you met creating comics, and any lessons learned you can share? What advice do you have for someone breaking into the entertainment industry?

JB: My hurdles are all internal, and are probably pretty universal. I’m self-critical, I let perfection get in the way of good, I’m always barely a step ahead of my deadlines…

I don’t know that I can advise anyone on how to deal with any of that, but if there’s any wisdom I wish had been shared with me early on, it’d be: 1. You’re going to be terrible at this for while; it takes time to hone a professional level of craft, and that’s okay. 2: Becoming good at this is more important than getting hired, at least early on.

Most times, when someone’s asking how to ‘break in,’ they really want to know, ‘how do I get someone to hire me?’ The answer is both simple and the hardest to hear—become so good at what you do, they’ll want to pay you to do it. If you develop your talents, you won’t have to search for work. It’ll find you. Getting to that point takes years, though, and in the meantime you have to sweat it out and burn the crap out of your system, and the sooner the better.

GP: What can we expect from you next?

JB: I have a couple of stories coming up from Dark Horse on Free Comic Book Day in May. After that, nothing for a little while. I’ve stepped off the track for a bit to work on some long-delayed, original creator-owned projects. With any luck, you’re start seeing those roll out toward the end of the year.

Review – Hawken Genesis

HAWKEN GENESIS CoverOn a distant planet colonized by corporations, combat rages over precious resources, survival, and glory. As one man rises to power, another is tragically ruined in the process. But who will truly emerge victorious in the end? Based on the Free-to-Play online mech shooter Hawken, this original graphic novel serves as both prequel and sourcebook for the game world, offering players a glimpse of what came before the game, and what might come in the months ahead.

I’ve been reading the Hawken free digital comics on comiXology, and have really enjoyed them. Though short, they gave a great feel to the world, they were teasers and acted as such. They did so in a really solid way. So, going into this graphic novel, I knew the general setting (I’ve also been checking out the video game at the same time). I like mechs, a lot, so the setting and battle scenes already had a cool factor to me. But, when I read the graphic novel, I was in for so much more.

The story is a prequel and how the world Hawken is based in got the way it is. The story is fairly simple in rival corporations battling things out over resources and something goes wrong in the arms race. It’s pretty cool sci-fi, but we’ve seen it before.

What really stands out to me is the details and how this graphic novel is put together. In between each chapter (each chapter has a different artist) there’s small tablets or computer screens or cell phones with more details on the world around it. Instead of just getting chapter breaks with some pin-up image, we get richer detail on this world. And it’s a cool world, so I dug learning more. It’s a great touch that adds to the overall package. And since this ties into a video game, that synergy of “technology” helping advance the story works well with the fact it’s a video game. Something just feels right about that.

In fact, I want to see more of that. I’d like to see more synergy of this product. More comics, maybe push a text based story or snippets to fans. There’s so much potential here. But, that seems like something for another post.

Overall, if you’re a fan of giant robots, future worlds, battles between corporations, or a fan of the video game, absolutely check this graphic novel out.

Story: Jeremy Barlow Original Concept: Khang Le Original Story: Dan Jevons Art: Kody Chamberlain, Federico Dallocchio, Nathan Fox, Michael Gaydos, Bagus Hutomo, Sid Kotian, Khang Le, Christopher Moeller, Alex Sanchez, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Francisco Ruiz Velasco

Story: 8.35 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Archaia provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview – Hawken Genesis

Hawken Genesis

Writer: Jeremy Barlow
Original Concept: Khang Le
Original Story: Dan Jevons
Art: Kody Chamberlain, Federico Dallocchio, Nathan Fox, Michael Gaydos, Bagus Hutomo, Sid Kotian, Khang Le, Christopher Moeller, Alex Sanchez, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Francisco Ruiz Velasco
Price: $19.95 print or $9.99 on comiXology
136 pages, Full Color
Diamond Order Code: JAN130839, ISBN: 978-1-936393-92-3)
Out: March 27th

On a distant planet colonized by corporations, combat rages over precious resources, survival, and glory. As one man rises to power, another is tragically ruined in the process. But who will truly emerge victorious in the end? Based on the Free-to-Play online mech shooter HAWKEN, this original graphic novel serves as both prequel and sourcebook for the game world, offering players a glimpse of what came before the game, and what might come in the months ahead.

HAWKEN GENESIS Cover

Archaia Is Off to Emerald City Comicon!

ArchaiaArchaia Entertainment is excited to announce it will be exhibiting at Emerald City Comicon, taking place March 1-3, 2013 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, Washington!

Several Archaia creators will be on hand to sign copies of their books or promotional items at the Archaia booth #808, including: Andrew E. C. Gaska; Chandra Free; Charles Soule; Dave Marquez; David Petersen; Royden Lepp; Yehudi Mercado.

Special advance copies of the Hawken: Genesis anthology graphic novel hardcover, which is based on the hit online, free-to-play mech game from Meteor Entertainment, will debut at ECCC and be available for sale. Writers Khang Le and Jeremy Barlow will be on hand to sign copies at the Archaia booth and at the Meteor booth in the Gaming Area.

In addition, a promotion through FourSquare will give fans the chance to win a prize pack comprised of autographed copies of Mouse Guard Vol. 1: Fall 1152, Rust Vol. 1: Visitor in the Field, and Hawken: Genesis. Just be sure to check in at the Archaia booth through the FourSquare app on your iOS or Android phone once you’re at the show and you’re automatically entered!

For programming, Archaia will put on an exciting, entertaining panel at the show:

Archaia Presents: How I Broke in to Comics (and How You Can, Too!)
Friday, March 1, 4-5pm, Room 3AB
Ever wonder how some of your favorite creators broke in to comics, or were curious how some up-and-comers get to be “up-and-comers”? Join some of Archaia’s creators for a lively discussion of how they got their first break in comics, and to hear their advice on how you can, too! Panelists include Chandra Free (The God Machine, Fraggle Rock), Andrew E.C. Gaska (Space: 1999: Aftershock and Awe, Conspiracy of the Planet of the Apes), Royden Lepp (Rust), David Marquez (Syndrome, The Joyners in 3D), Yehudi Mercado (Pantalones, TX), David Petersen (Mouse Guard), and Charles Soule (Strange Attractors).

Archaia and comiXology’s Final Hawken Promotion

Hawken_Genesis_04_Archaia_comiXologyThe fourth and final installment of Hawken has arrived through comiXology, and features a code for 50% off the full Hawken: Genesis graphic novel on comiXology and a code to redeem for 5,000 In-Game Credits for Hawken. With thousands of players engaged in the free-to-play online video game since its Open Beta in December, award-winning graphic novel publisher Archaia Entertainment and free-to-play video game publisher Meteor Entertainment want to thank the Hawken community. Hawken is a free-to-play multiplayer mech first-person shooter developed by Adhesive Games and published by Meteor Entertainment.

This preview is available across comiXology’s entire digital comics platform, including the iPhone, iPad, Android, Kindle Fire, Windows 8, and the Web. “The Cost of Doing Business” is written by Jeremy Barlow, with illustration by Nathan Fox. You can get it now on comiXology.

Downloading this FREE release by 12 a.m. PST on March 13, 2013 will entitle fans to receive a unique discount code that can be redeemed for 50% off the final Hawken: Genesis graphic novel, to be released on comiXology on March 13, 2013. Fans will also receive a unique code that can be redeemed within the free-to-play online mech first-person shooter Hawken, good for 5,000 Hawken Credits—in-game currency that can be used to buy items, accessories, and to upgrade your mech. These unique codes will be emailed to fans after March 13, 2013 by comiXology, to the address associated with their comiXology account.

Hawken: Genesis is written by Jeremy Barlow based on the original concept by Khang Le, with original story by Dan Jevons, and illustration by Kody Chamberlain, Federico Dallocchio, Nathan Fox, Michael Gaydos, Bagus Hutomo, Sid Kotian, Khang Le, Christopher Moeller, Alex Sanchez, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Francisco Ruiz Velasco. It will debut digitally on March 13, 2013, and on store shelves on March 27th.

You can also get the three previous FREE previews on comiXology.

Free Hawken: Genesis Teaser #3 Released Today!

Hawken_Genesis_03_Archaia_comiXologyFollowing the successful launch of the free-to-play online video game Hawken in December, Archaia Entertainment and free-to-play video game publisher Meteor Entertainment rewarded fans for their dedication and support by offering an exclusive, digital-only issue of Hawken: Genesis for FREE.

This latest installment will only be made available through comiXology, with no plans for a printed edition. Previous installments have offered an early look at chapters featured in Archaia’s forthcoming hardcover graphic novel, Hawken: Genesis which will go on sale March 27 in comic shops. The full-length original graphic novel is written by Jeremy Barlow with concept by Khang Le, story by Dan Jevons, and illustration by Kody Chamberlain, Federico Dallocchio, Nathan Fox, Michael Gaydos, Bagus Hutomo, Sid Kotian, Khang Le, Christopher Moeller, Alex Sanchez, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Francisco Ruiz Velasco.

This exclusive short story is available through comiXology. “No Witness So Dreadful” features story and cover by the game’s creator and creative director, Khang Le, with illustration by Hoang Nguyen and Kinsun Loh.

Hawken is a free-to-play multiplayer mech first-person shooter developed by Adhesive Games and published by Meteor Entertainment. Hawken entered Open Beta on December 12, 2012. Hawken creates an intense and enjoyable battle experience that captures the feeling of piloting a heavy war machine while keeping the action fast-paced and strategic.

Get Hawken and Access to a Closed Beta

Archaia Entertainment and Meteor Entertainment have teamed up with comiXology to debut four, free exclusive digital preview issues of Hawken: Genesis, a hardcover graphic novel based on the highly anticipated online video game, Hawken! This week marks the release of the first exclusive preview throughout comiXology’s digital comics platform available across the iPhone, iPad, Android, Kindle Fire, and the Web. This exclusive digital preview includes a special access code for Hawken’s third closed beta event, happening November 20th – December 6th, 2012. Adhesive and Meteor have been so thankful for the fan feedback in the first two closed betas they couldn’t wait to extend the invite to the graphic novel audience.

The Hawken: Genesis full-length graphic novel arrives March 2013 and will be published by Archaia Entertainment. This hard-hitting original graphic novel establishes and explores the exciting world of Illal, the backdrop for the Hawken video game universe. Developed alongside Khang Le, the game’s Creative Director and lead conceptual designer of Adhesive Games, and featuring the talent of some of the industry’s top conceptual artists, comic illustrators, and painters, Hawken: Genesis is both a prequel and sourcebook to the epic warfare players will experience firsthand in the Hawken video game. Readers will get an amazing look at the vast post-apocalyptic mythology behind Hawken and follow the stories of the pivotal individuals that determine Illal’s fate!

The first exclusive comiXology digital preview, “Prelude to Ruin,” is written by Jeremy Barlow and illustrated by Francisco Ruiz Velasco. It can be accessed at this link: http://cmxl.gy/HawkenGenesis-1.

Three more exclusive digital previews will premiere monthly only through comiXology, and ultimately leading to the hardcover’s release this March.

Hawken: Genesis is written by Khang Le and Jeremy Barlow and illustrated by Kody Chamberlain, Federico Dallocchio, Nathan Fox, Michael Gaydos, Bagus Hutomo, Sid Kotian, Khang Le, Christopher Moeller, Alex Sanchez, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Francisco Ruiz Velasco. It will debut March 2013.

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