Tag Archives: gavin mitchell

The 24 Panels Anthology Features, Alan Moore, Kieron Gillen, and More to Benefit the Grenfell Fire Survivors

Image Comics has announced the forthcoming 24 Panels Anthology, curated by New York Times bestselling creator Kieron Gillen with co-editor Steve Thompson, and featuring work from some of the most celebrated storytellers and artists in the industry. The charity anthology will benefit the survivors of the Grenfell fire.

In June 2017, the Grenfell fire killed 72 people in a 24-story tower block in West London. 24 Panels is an anthology comic to support the PTSD needs of the survivors. The 24 Panels Anthology will be comprised of 24 stories, each no longer than 24 panels. Half drawn from professional creators who volunteered their time and half drawn from open submissions, 24 PANELS is about community, hope, and (most of all) raising as much money as possible.

Al Ewing, Alan Moore, Alex de Campi, Antony Johnston, Caspar Wijngaard, Dan Watters, Dilraj Mann, Doug Braithwaite, Gavin Mitchell, Laurie Penny, Leigh Alexander, Lizz Lunney, Melinda Gebbie, Paul Cornell, Rachael Smith, Ram V, Robin Hoelzemann, Rosy Higgins, Sara Kenney, Sarah Gordon, Ted Brandt, Tom Humberstone, Tula Lotay, and more will contribute to 24 Panels.

24 Panels (Diamond Code SEP180079, ISBN: 978-1-5343-1126-8) will be available in comic book stores on Wednesday, November 21st. The final order cutoff for comics retailers is Monday, October 8th.

It will be available in bookstores on Tuesday, November 27th and can be pre-ordered at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-a-Million, Indiebound, and Indigo.

Review: The Pride Vol. 1

Growing up as a cinephile, I loved watching 70s movies especially those starring a young femme fatale named Pam Grier. The way she commanded he screen had just about every man in my family grinning from ear to ear. As years went by I saw an older yet still very much attractive actor in movies when she played a supporting character but that smile still got every man that was in her presence. So, it was pretty much kismet, when I found out she was going to be in a TV show on Showtime, The L Word.

I went into the show because of Grier but came out of the show, a massive fan, of the characters, the stories, and the culture, as it opened my eyes to a world I never knew existed. As the show explored the many intricacies surrounding sexual identity and the discrimination that women and any person who identifies as LGBTQ face daily. This opened my eyes to just how marginalized they were, or rarely they see themselves reflected in the arts without the utilization of stereotypes, especially comics. It was only within the past few years, comics have started to delve into telling these narratives with standouts being the superior Sunstone and the gone too soon Midnighter. Another standout that I came across was Joe Glass’ The Pride, which revolve around a team of superheroes who just so happens to be LGBTQ.

In the opening pages we meet a well-meaning superhero, Fab-Man, who is openly gay and who is not taken as seriously as his cisgender counterparts. This leads him to create his own, his “Justice League” full of LGBTQ superheroes who fight injustice as well as they face villains who are homophobic and evil and struggle to find a synergy to work with each other. One of the standout stories is “You Think You’re a Man,” one of our heroes finds out he has a son and a one of the villains has kidnapped him, leading our heroes to a trap which looks to silences one member forever. In “It Gets Better,” Fab Man talks a young boy who wants to commit suicide after being harassed because he was gay. In the last standout story, we get the origin of “Muscle Mary,” a warrior who can do battle with anyone but who originally came to the world of men, to avenge a death, but eventually came to defend mortals.

Overall, The Pride is a comic which shows that heroes are never black and white and usually contain multitudes of layers. Some times those layers is what makes you extraordinary. The stories by the different writers is well developed, smart, and exciting. Th art by the different artists complement the stories well. Altogether, a strong book.

Story: Joe Glass, PJ Montgomery, Mike Garley
Art: Kris Anka, Kris Carter, Elizabeth Swann, Hector Barros, Nathan Ashworth, Ben Wilsonham, Mike Stock, Ricardo Bessa, Gavin Mitchell, Maxime Garbarini, Dan Harris, Ryan Cody, Christian Wildgoose and Cory Smith
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Aces Weekly Asks You to Pick a Card, Any Card

Aces Weekly, the on-line comic magazine, founded in 2012 by David Lloyd and Bambos Georgiou, has announced the release of a set of collectible “trading cards”, which give purchasers access to volumes of the award-winning publication.

Each of the ten cards features an image from a specific volume on one side and a unique code on the other, which allows access to that volume. Volumes feature at least six different stories spanning seven issues and are often over 200 pages in length.

The cards are limited editions of 100 per volume, and are available from direct sales comic shops retailing for £6.99 for one card.

The first ten volumes feature a stellar line-up of established talent such as David Lloyd,  Herb Trimpe, Marc Hempel, Henry Flint, James Hudnall, Val Mayerik, JC Vaughn, Mark Wheatley, Phil Hester, John McCrea, Yishan Li, Algesiras, Alain Mauricet, Alexandre Tefenkgi, Roger Langridge, Dan Christensen, Kev Hopgood, Ferg Handley, Dave Hine, Shaky Kane, Keith Burns, Lew Stringer, Carl Critchlow, Phil Elliott, Lew Stringer, Stephen Baskerville, Jim Hansen, Mychailo Kazybrid, David Leach, Batton Lash, Jimmy Broxton and Bambos Georgiou.

Aces Weekly has also managed to launch plenty of breakout creators during those first ten volumes, including Paul McCaffrey, David Hitchcock, Ben Dickson, Gavin Mitchell, Esteban Hernandez, Kathryn Layno, Jok, Santullo, Rachael Smith and Lawrence Beveridge of the Fearless Vampire Killers, to name but a few.

The cards feature the following artist;

Volume 1 David Lloyd
Volume 2 Henry Flint
Volume 3 Marc Hempel
Volume 4 Herb Trimpe
Volume 5 Shaky Kane
Volume 6 Roger Langridge
Volume 7 Nardo Conforti
Volume 8 Paul McCaffrey
Volume 9 Val Mayerik
Volume 10 Keith Burns

Comic shops can obtain wholesale prices and order sets of cards by contacting Bambos Georgiou at info@acesweekly.co.uk

Aces Weekly Volume 3 Starts Today!

Aces Weekly News_page1_image1Volume three of Aces Weekly, the revolutionary digital comic art weekly, begins its seven-issue, seven-week run on Monday, February 4 .

Here’s what you can expect during this volume…

It features a further seven-week installment of Mark Wheatley and JC Vaughan’s, fantastic Return of The Human

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Roger Langridge’s, The Fez

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Antonio Bifulco and Giuseppe Rungetti’s, Gabriel – Warrior Exorcist

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The extraordinary and brilliant Paul Maybury’s, Astori

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Another chapter of Ben Dickson and Gavin Mitchell’s Santa Claus Versus The Nazis

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Steve Marchant’s, Six Minutes Past Midnight

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And a hymn of hope and a very special tribute to New Yorkers from the great creator of the Third World War series Seth TobocmanOne City

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Also Marc Hempel, Martin Griffiths, Alberto Jiménez Alburquerque and much more…

That’s seven weekly issues and up to 210 pages of great serials, short stories and extras for just over a dollar a week from www.acesweekly.co.uk