Tag Archives: young terrorists

Matt Pizzolo’s Young Terrorists Books Playlist

by Matt Pizzolo

The germ of the idea behind Young Terrorists came when I was blackballed by a Washington lobbyist for distributing a documentary about animal rights activists who were serving time in federal prison as terrorists. It’s kind’ve a long story, and I go into it a bit in the backmatter of Young Terrorists #1. The point is… we all talk about “the system” and how it works or it doesn’t work, but it’s not until the system turns directly on you, til an insider who really knows how to work the machine identifies you as an individual to be targeted and starts grinding the gears around you, that’s when you get an inkling of the scale of it all… It feels kinda like when the eye of Sauron catches sight of Frodo — some omnipotent power has just noticed you and suddenly you’re very very fucked.

This all happened a while back, when the GW Bush Administration passed a law called The Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, which made it so any activism against a business that exploits animals is classified as terrorism and punishable under the PATRIOT Act. The Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act is a law that was brought to you by (wait for it) lobbyists who (you guessed it) work for businesses that exploit animals.

I only got the tiniest smidge of the lobbyist’s fury, and it was enough to rattle me. And I’m kind’ve not that easy to rattle, which is sort’ve how I wound up in that situation in the first place.

There’s no shortage of people abusing power across America and around the world. I love comics about superheroes who fights mutants and Nazis and various flavors of dudes-in-pajamas, but in this case I was inspired to create a team of superheroes who fight back against an abusive power structure. The power structure we all call home.

Issue 2 came out last week. Technically it’s over a year late. But… looking around at the world we’re living in right now, kinda feels like it came out right on time. Honestly, it’s pretty upsetting when you write dystopia fiction and people start calling your body of work prescient.

If you’re interested in some of the ideas beneath the surface of Young Terrorists, here are a few of the books I was reading when I wrote it. In several cases they directly impacted the actions on the page, in other cases they’re just sources I relied on to remind me why I’m always so pissed off all the time.

EATING ANIMALS

By Jonathan Safran Foer

This isn’t the book that turned me vegan when I was 17 years old, that was John Robbins’ DIET FOR A NEW AMERICA. But I’d heard good things about EATING ANIMALS and I wanted to re-acclimate before writing Cesar, since I’d lapsed into being a lazy vegetarian over the decades. And yeah, everything’s just as awful as I’d remembered it. Foer has a sincere, every-new-dad approach that makes the whole thing less polemic and more palatable, but it was a healthy shot of rage with specificity and if you read it you’ll note detailed descriptions of some of the treatment of animals that Cesar ponders in issue 1. EATING ANIMALS didn’t inspire the issue 4 illustration of cows being driven into a shredding machine and forcefed to their brothers and sisters though, that image has been burned into my brain since I read DIET FOR A NEW AMERICA.

eating-animals

THE DIVIDE: AMERICAN INJUSTICE IN THE AGE OF THE WEALTH GAP

By Matt Taibbi, with incredible art by Molly Crabapple

Taibbi is a national treasure for his relentless mocking of Wall Street in Rolling Stone throughout the financial crisis. THE DIVIDE delves into real-life stories that paint a mosaic of how our economic infrastructure fleeces the poor by the millions in order to upstream wealth to the elites. The scenes of Sera and Cesar joining migrants forced at gunpoint across the border directly into the hands of drug cartels waiting to kidnap and ransom them is directly inspired by this book (unless that technically counts as plagiarism, in which case I never read it). Taibbi has the guts to list specific locations and name names, whereas I am way too gutless (also I live closer to the border so fuck that—btw, if you’re in a drug cartel: I’m referring to the Canadian border cuz I live in Vancouver… f’real). Anyhow, if you actually want to learn something read his book not mine.

the-divide-american-injustice-in-the-age-of-the-wealth-gap

ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE

By Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera

all-the-devils-are-here

CONFIDENCE MEN: WALL STREET, WASHINGTON, AND THE EDUCATION OF A PRESIDENT

By Ron Suskind

confidence-men

THE BIG SHORT

By Michael Lewis

the-big-short

GRIFTOPIA

By Matt Taibbi

griftopia

TOO BIG TO FAIL

By Andrew Ross Sorkin

too-big-to-fail

These are various books on the financial crisis, which I’m listing together because only a sociopath would read all of them. THE BIG SHORT is great (I heard it got made into a movie?), GRIFTOPIA is cool, and CONFIDENCE MEN was the one I probably found to be the most enjoyable read (though it’ll really make you grieve Bernie’s campaign), but I ultimately thought ALL THE DEVILS ARE HERE was the most thorough account of the financial crisis with a ton of insight and details I hadn’t already heard elsewhere—which is probably why it’s the least popular on the list. TOO BIG TO FAIL was the most popular on the list until Adam McKay came along, and thank god for McKay because TBTF is fucking atrocious and should be stricken from the record—that book helped inspire Sera’s line “history is written by the culprits.”

BLACK FLAGS: THE RISE OF ISIS

By Joby Warrick

I tried a few books about ISIS/ISIL/Daesh trying to get a real breakdown on how exactly they structured a sovereign state rather than just being an insurgent, guerrilla group. Most of the books I found were dumb propaganda, fake-news, or not interesting enough to bother mentioning. BLACK FLAGS is legitimately great though. It’s mainly a pretty thorough biography of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, but it also expands to encompass the ensemble of characters and situations that led to the formation and operation of the Islamic State. And if you’re confused about what the fuck is going on in Syria, this book gives an insightful view through several facets of the prism.

black-flags-the-rise-of-isis

THE SECRET ARCHITECTURE OF OUR NATION’S CAPITAL

By David Ovason

I can’t remember if any of the Washington DC architectural stuff from the Young Terrorists FCBD story is actually from this book or not. I think I read this book wanting to find existing conspiracy theories about Washington DC architecture, but I didn’t like any of them so I just synthesized my own. This book is mostly about how a lot of the Founding Fathers were freemasons and how that inspired DC’s architecture. (I also read FAITHS OF THE FOUNDING FATHERS which was pretty good and asserts they were Deists.) Third Eye Comics was kind enough to fly me out to Baltimore for a signing, so I went to DC afterward and mapped out how the buildings face each other, that’s when I noticed the Eagle on the Fed building is basically glaring in Lincoln’s direction and I remembered years back reading an observation that Lincoln and JFK were the only two Presidents to go around the central banks and as luck would have it both were assassinated… that observation wasn’t made in this book though, I think it was in Jim Marrs’ RULE BY SECRECY. Which is great and fucking bananas.

the-secret-architecture-of-our-nations-capital

THE DOORS OF PERCEPTION

By Aldous Huxley

Huxley’s my all-time favorite writer, but I never read this book because I’m straightedge and I don’t care about Jim Morrison. Turns out it’s pretty rad though, and it finally made me understand the reason I never needed drugs as a kid is because I got the shit kicked out of me so much. Supposedly science later disproved this, but I’m stickin’ with Huxley.

the-doors-of-perception

Preview: Young Terrorists #2

YOUNG TERRORISTS #2

Artist: Amancay Nahuelpan
Writer: Matteo Pizzolo
Colorist: Jean-Paul Csuka
Letterer: David Hopkins & Jim Campbell
IN STORES: 12/14

What if “The Smoking Man” from X-Files was a real person, and his daughter found out what he did for a living?

The daughter of an assassinated globalist kingpin breaks out of an internment camp and leads her fellow escaped prisoners in a battle against an elitist conspiracy of shadow governments, megabanks, and military juntas in this edgy and subversive political thriller.

Amancay Nahuelpan’s fresh, emotive and edgy art style gives kinetic life to the paradigm-shifting story, a return to Pizzolo’s street philosophy and punk polemic roots that Film Threat characterized as “unapologetically brutal and surprisingly intelligent.”

The 84-page issue 2 perfect-bound prestige-edition completes the first mini-series story arc for these audacious anti-heroes.

young-terrorists-2-1

Sell-Outs and New Printing Roundup

Check out some of the sell-outs and new printings announced this past week.

Black Mask Studios

Young Terrorists #1 exploded into comic shops and immediately sold out at the distributor level. Black Mask Studios has announced the comic is going to a new printing with a brand new cover. The series by writer Matt Pizzolo and and artist Amancay Nahuelpan will get a second printing cover from Tess Fowler and Tamra Bonvillain.

YOUNG TERRORISTS #1 Reprint

Review: Young Terrorists #1

YOUNG TERRORISTS #1 1The daughter of an assassinated globalist kingpin breaks out of an internment camp and leads her fellow escaped prisoners in a battle against an elitist conspiracy of shadow governments, megabanks, and military juntas in this edgy and subversive political thriller.

The concept behind Black Mask Studio‘s latest series Young Terrorists is, what if “The Smoking Man” from X-Files was a real person, and his daughter found out what he did for a living?

Its been a few days, and I’m still digesting the oversized first issue written by Matt Pizzolo with art by Amancay Nahuelpan. At 80 pages, there’s a hell of a lot crammed into the first issue, which bounces around a bit introducing us to the various players. It almost at times feels like a Tarantino film with the various vignettes coming together towards the end.

The first issue is as brutal as it is thought provoking, almost a Fight Club for the politically active revolutionary set.

This being an oversized first issue, there’s a lot here, and at the same time, there’s still more than enough left out to create a mystery of what’s to come. The use of terrorism and violence to fight corruption will give Pizzolo years of stories ahead, especially in today’s political and social climate. Pizzolo also mines what a small revolutionary group might actually be like in today’s world, how they would insulate themselves, what they’d do to set up shop, in a few pages he creates a world and system that feels real. He also hits some very real issues like Detroit’s borderline “failed state” status. It’s a stark reminder that while this may be a comic, it’s making a statement about the world we live in.

It’s all brought to life through Nahuelpan’s art which is as brutal (in a good way) as the story itself. You can almost feel the scrapes and bruises, each punch, and every bit of violence shown. It’s an awesome combination of writer and artist and Amancay is showing off in this first issue that this is an artist to watch.

While I’ll admit I didn’t catch everything going on in the first issue (nor do I need to), the debut is a hell of a package that will get you to think about it well after you’ve read it. Young Terrorists is a debut that is as thought provoking as much as it is raw and brutal. Can’t wait to see what comes next.

Story: Matt Pizzolo Art: Amancay Nahuelpan
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.45 Recommendation: Buy

Black Mask Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Around the Tubes

It was new comic book day yesterday! What’d folks get that you really enjoyed? What’d you get that you didn’t? Sound off in the comments!

Around the Tubes

iO9 – The 5 Most Ridiculously Sexist Superhero Names in Comics – Have others that you think are worse?

ArtsBeat – ‘Simpsons’ Memorabilia to Be Auctioned From Sam Simon Collection – So much we want!

ICv2 – Ultra Pro Acquires Jolly Roger Games – Interesting move.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

CBR – I Hate Fairyland #1

ICv2 – Space Dumblins

The Outhousers – Young Terrorists #1

Amancay Nahuelpan’s Art Process for Young Terrorists #1

We have a look behind the scenes at the art process of Amancay Nahuelpan for Young Terrorists #1 from Black Mask Studios. The comic written by Matt Pizzolo is out this Wednesday and asks what if “The Smoking Man” from X-Files was a real person, and his daughter found out what he did for a living?

The daughter of an assassinated globalist kingpin breaks out of an internment camp and leads her fellow escaped prisoners in a battle against an elitist conspiracy of shadow governments, megabanks, and military juntas in this edgy and subversive political thriller.

Check out the cool creative process below for three different pages, including the cover, before the comic hits shelves this Wednesday. Click on the images to get an even better look at them.

 

 

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Justice League #43Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Brett

Nanjing: The Burning City HC (Dark Horse) – This is one of those weeks where I could have easily chosen 20 different comics to put on my picks. Narrowing it down to five was very difficult, but this book is absolutely on top. A graphic novel taking place in Nanjing during the Chinese occupation/attack during the second Chinese/Japanese war. The atrocities committed are staggering, and this graphic novel is a nice introduction that will hopefully get people more interested in this genocide and destruction.

Hip Hop Family Tree #1 (Fantagraphics) – If you missed it, the praised Fantagraphics graphic novel series is being released as monthly comics with extra material, so perfect for new readers and old readers like. The series is an amazing recounting of the rise of hip hop music.

Oxymoron: The Loveliest Nightmare #1 (Comix Tribe) – I love Comix Tribe’s releases, though their release schedule can be a bit spotty at times. This new series, spinning out of The Red Ten, which is being released a week early, focuses on the supervillain the Oxymoron. Comix Tribe is a publisher that absolutely deserves more eyes on their releases.

Princeless: Raven, the Pirate Princess #2 (Action Lab Entertainment) – Jeremy Whitley’s Princeless has been both entertaining and destroying comic tropes and stereotypes at the same time. This new series, which spun out of the last volume, focuses on Raven as she builds a pirate crew to take on her brothers. This issue is amazing, and there’s one sequence in particular that’ll get you laughing and thinking.

Young Terrorists #1 (Black Mask Studios) – A fascinating read that I’m still digesting. It gets Black Mask Studios back to its political roots, taking on corporations, governments, really, society as a whole.

 

Edward

Top Pick: Justice League #43 (DC Comics) – The ending to the previous issue, with Batman taking on the role of Metron, is one of the big type of developments that Geoff Johns loves in his storytelling.  Where this story arc goes from here is anyone’s guess, but it is going to be something big.

Manifest Destiny #16 (Image Comics) – This series continues with the unexplained mysteries of America’s interior, as was seen by a different Lewis and Clark.  The revelations of the previous issue seem like they will have a big impact going forward.

Secret Wars: Secret Love #1 (Marvel) – Romance comics are an important part of the history of the medium of comics.  It is nice to see a romance inspired tie-in to Secret Wars, though it will be interesting to see exactly where they take it.

Silk #6 (Marvel) – There are still a few Marvel monthlies that are moving along somewhat unbothered by Secret Wars, and Silk is one of them.  This fun series never got a good chance to gain a decent fan base but continues to impress.

Van Helsing Vs. Dracula #1 (Zenescope) – Dracula is probably the most widely used villain in comics, not in terms of appearances, but in terms of how many companies have published stories with him.  Liesel Van Helsing is a steampunk heroine that has never made the connection with readers.  Putting the two together seems like it might work though.

 

Elana

Top Pick: Princeless: Raven the Pirate Princess #2 (Action Lab Entertainment) –  Everyone loves Princeless, the feminist, funny, exciting all-ages fantasy comic staring women of color and a dragon. Raven the Pirate Princess is not just a spin-off series, it is the next step of maturation for the adventure/fantasy world Jeremy Whitley is building. While both series are all-ages this one is aimed at slightly older kids. It very effectively lampoons real world sexism in ways that I want to put on freaking flyers and hand out at conferences.

Just as important, it features young women flirting with each other. So you get pirate ships and also ‘shipping in one family-friendly, queer positive, comic book featuring mostly people of color.

Marvel, DC, take note.

Which brings us to….

Top Pick: Secret Wars: Secret Loves #1 (Marvel) – Jeremy Whitley, creator of the feminist all-ages fantasy comic dynamo that is Princeless is finally writing something for Marvel. It’s a romance story featuring Danny Rand and Misty Knight! If that wasn’t enough in this comic we get Kamalah Kahn and Robbie Reyes together. Marvel should probably publish a full time romance series again. Other then X-Men.

Black Canary #3 (DC Comics) – Last issue ended on a cliff hanger. Who’s Dinah’s ex in the covert-ops suit? And how does that mysterious kid play guitar like that? And when will someone buy me an Annie Wu commission? Her art here is killer.

Island #2 (Image Comics) – Bored of comics? Want something new? Buy this. All of the art is unlike any of the other comics art you have. Unless you read a lot of Brandon Graham stuff in which case the Brandon Graham stuff will be familiar. And by familiar I mean awesome.

Power-Up #2 (BOOM! Box/BOOM! Studios) – Magical girls for everyone! Magical girls for construction workers with beards! For Mom’s in station wagons with irritable teenagers! For tiny gold fish! And for under-employed retail workers. Cute and heartfelt. Read the review I wrote for issue 1.

Secret Six #5 (DC Comics) – Gail Simone’s original run on Secret Six is one of my favorite comics of all time. It’s taken a while to get this new volume up and running properly. But the last issue marked a major upswing in the series. It’s harkening back to the twisted humor, over the top violence and drama between members of a found family of fucked-up people that made readers fall in love with the original series.

Wolf #2 (Image Comics) – Urban fantasy is a dime a dozen right now but Ales Kott’s new series Wolf stands out. The story is completely unpredictable. This series has a David Lynchian vibe I haven’t felt in anything else I read. It’s reminiscent in tone Mulholland Drive in particular. The series is genuinely creepy and a little confusing. But I love Mulholland Drive for those very reasons. So consider that praise for this book too.

 

Mr. H

Top Pick: Justice League #43 (DC Comics) – Forget Age of Ultron and Ant-Man, this has been the cinematic adventure of the year for me! I love how Johns has taken the old cliché of “Bat-God” and turned it literal. Awesome stuff. His reinterpretation of Darkseid and his Apokolips horde is fantastic.  I don’t see it slowing down. Waiting at the bus stop for the next Boom Tube!

Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #4 (Marvel Comics) – Peter finally gets his daughter back and she fights by his side. I don’t think anything more needs to be said. Thwip this one up quick Webheads!

House of M #1 (Marvel Comics) – What’s better than one rule under Doom? Try Magneto. I am very glad they are revisiting this story. Was great when it was originally published. However what could Wanda wish away this time? How about hoping she utters the words “No More Reboots.”

Superman/ Wonder Woman #20 (DC Comics) – Continuing the Truth story, I’m eager to see what became of Lana Lang but if this month doesn’t turn it around, this might be it for me on this title. Big fan of Mahnke but not sure his art can save me on this. Hope I’m wrong.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles #49 (IDW Publishing) – One more issue till the big one. This is where it hits the fan! Turtles, Shredder, Splinter, Bebop, Rocksteady, Metalhead, Karai. I am eagerly awaiting the showdown. Rumor is one of the Turtles may not survive..

Preview: Young Terrorists #1

YOUNG TERRORISTS #1

Artist: Amancay Nahuelpan
Writer: Matt Pizzolo
Colorist: Jean-Paul Csuka
Letterer: Jim Campbell
IN COMIC STORES: 8/19
IN BOOK STORES: 9/1

What if “The Smoking Man” from X-Files was a real person, and his daughter found out what he did for a living?

The daughter of an assassinated globalist kingpin breaks out of an internment camp and leads her fellow escaped prisoners in a battle against an elitist conspiracy of shadow governments, megabanks, and military juntas in this edgy and subversive political thriller.

Amancay Nahuelpan’s fresh, emotive and edgy art style gives kinetic life to the paradigm-shifting story, a return to Pizzolo’s street philosophy and punk polemic roots that Film Threat characterized as “unapologetically brutal and surprisingly intelligent.”

The 80-page issue 1 perfect-bound prestige-edition launches this new ongoing series, continuing forward with standard 32-page monthly issues.

YOUNG TERRORISTS #1 1