Tag Archives: watchmen

Watchmen on HBO: Black Wall Street, “Trust In the Law”, masks & politics

Victor Luckerson is writing a book about Tulsa’s Black Wall Street, which was highlighted by HBO‘s Watchmen series. Felicia Perez is the Innovation Director at the Center for Story-based Strategy. We team up to look at the real history and current politics behind the most 2019 of HBO shows. Also, check out Victor’s essay in the New Yorker: “The Great Achievement of Watchmen is Showing How Black Americans Shape History

Discussed:

  • Lady Trieu is Batman
  • Why it took me so long to cover this show (partially Alan Moore)
  • The power and danger of Nostalgia
  • America’s messed-up relationship with history
  • The problem with conspiracies
  • Ohhhhhklahoma! (is not OK)
  • and of course, the actual comics. 

Victor Luckerson: Twitter and newsletter runitback.substack.com.

Felicia Perez Facebook and Twitter 

and me, send me feedback! Twitter

Around the Tubes

Detective Comics #1000

It’s a new week and we’ve got lots coming at you. While you wait for things to get rolling, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

The Comichron – Comic book, graphic novel sales to comics shops up 2% in 2019; Detective #1000, Watchmen top charts – For those that enjoy the race.

How To Love Comics – Iron Man 2020 Reading Order Guide – For anyone that wants to know where to start and go from there!

ICv2 – Game and Toy Distributor Completes Majority Recapitalization – Equity firms aren’t a good thing… hopefully this works out well.

Review

The Beat – A Sparrow’s Roar

Avengers: Endgame, Joker, and Watchmen Walk Away Winners From the Critic’s Choice Awards

Joker

Joker and Watchmen both took home multiple prizes from the 2020 Critics Choice Awards.

Joaquin Phoenix won for “Best Actor” for his lead portrayal in Joker. It also saw another win for Hildur Guðnadóttir for “Best Score.”

The film lost “Best Picture,” “Best Adapted Screenplay,” “Best Cinematography,” “Best Production Design,” and “Best Hair and Makeup.”

Avengers: Endgame won for “Best Visual Effects” and “Best Action Movie” where it beat Spider-Man: Far From Home. The movie lost “Best Sci-Fi or Horror Movie.”

Watchmen picked up actor wins but lost “Best Drama Series.” Regina King won for “Best Actress in a Drama Series” while Jean Smart won for “Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series.” Tim Blake Nelson was also nominated for “Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series” but did not win.

Check out the full list of nominees and winners below.

FILM

Best Picture

1917
Ford v Ferrari
The Irishman
Jojo Rabbit
Joker
Little Women
Marriage Story
Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
Parasite
Uncut Gems

Best Actor

Antonio Banderas — Pain and Glory
Robert De Niro — The Irishman
Leonardo DiCaprio — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
Adam Driver — Marriage Story
Eddie Murphy — Dolemite Is My Name
Joaquin Phoenix — Joker
Adam Sandler — Uncut Gems

Best Actress

Awkwafina — The Farewell
Cynthia Erivo — Harriet
Scarlett Johansson — Marriage Story
Lupita Nyong’o — Us
Saoirse Ronan — Little Women
Charlize Theron — Bombshell
Renée Zellweger — Judy

Best Supporting Actor

Willem Dafoe — The Lighthouse
Tom Hanks — A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Anthony Hopkins — The Two Popes
Al Pacino — The Irishman
Joe Pesci — The Irishman
Brad Pitt — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

Best Supporting Actress

Laura Dern — Marriage Story
Scarlett Johansson — Jojo Rabbit
Jennifer Lopez — Hustlers
Florence Pugh — Little Women
Margot Robbie — Bombshell
Zhao Shuzhen — The Farewell 

Best Young Actor/Actress

Julia Butters — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
Roman Griffin Davis — Jojo Rabbit
Noah Jupe — Honey Boy
Thomas McKenzie — Jojo Rabbit
Shahadi Wright Joseph — Us
Archie Yates — Jojo Rabbit

Best Acting Ensemble

Bombshell
The Irishman
Knives Out
Little Women
Marriage Story
Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
Parasite

Best Director

Noah Baumbach — Marriage Story
Greta Gerwig — Little Women
Bong Joon Ho — Parasite
Sam Mendes — 1917
Josh Safdie and Benny Safdie — Uncut Gems
Martin Scorsese — The Irishman 
Quentin Tarantino — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood

Best Original Screenplay

Noah Baumbach — Marriage Story
Rian Johnson — Knives Out
Bong Joon Ho and Han Jin Won — Parasite
Quentin Tarantino — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
Lulu Wang — The Farewell

Best Adapted Screenplay

Greta Gerwig — Little Women
Noah Harpster and Micah Fitzerman-Blue — A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood
Anthony McCarten — The Two Popes 
Todd Phillips and Scott Silver — Joker
Taika Waititi — Jojo Rabbit
Steven Zaillian — The Irishman

Best Cinematography

Jarin Blaschke — The Lighthouse
Roger Deakins — 1917
Phedon Papamichael — Ford v Ferrari
Rodrigo Prieto — The Irishman
Robert Richardson — Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood 
Lawrence Sher — Joker

Best Production Design

Mark Friedberg, Kris Moran — Joker
Dennis Gassner, Lee Sandales — 1917
Jess Gonchor, Claire Kaufman — Little Women
Lee Ha Jun — Parasite
Barbara Ling, Nancy Haigh — Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Bob Shaw, Regina Graves — The Irishman
Donal Woods, Gina Cromwell — Downton Abbey

Best Editing

Ronald Bronstein, Benny Safdie — Uncut Gems
Andrew Buckland, Michael McCusker — Ford v Ferrari
Yang Jinmo — Parasite
Fred Raskin — Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Thelma Schoonmaker — The Irishman
Lee Smith — 1917

Best Costume Design

Ruth E. Carter — Dolemite Is My Name
Julian Day — Rocketman
Jacqueline Durran — Little Women
Arianne Phillips — Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Sandy Powell, Christopher Peterson — The Irishman
Anna Robbins — Downton Abbey

Best Hair and Makeup

Bombshell
Dolemite Is My Name
The Irishman
Joker
Judy
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Rocketman

Best Visual Effects

1917
Ad Astra
The Aeronauts
Avengers: Endgame
Ford v Ferrari
The Irishman
The Lion King

Best Animated Feature

Abominable
Frozen II
How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World
I Lost My Body
Missing Link
Toy Story 4

Best Action Movie

1917
Avengers: Endgame
Ford v Ferrari
John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum
Spider-Man: Far From Home

Best Comedy

Booksmart
Dolemite Is My Name
The Farewell
Jojo Rabbit
Knives Out

Best Sci-Fi or Horror Movie

Ad Astra
Avengers: Endgame
Midsommar
Us

Best Foreign Language Film

Atlantics
Les Misérables
Pain and Glory
Parasite
Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Best Song

“Glasgow (No Place Like Home)” – Wild Rose
“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” – Rocketman
“I’m Standing With You” – Breakthrough
“Into the Unknown” – Frozen II
“Speechless” – Aladdin
“Spirit “– The Lion King
“Stand Up” – Harriet

Best Score

Michael Abels – Us
Alexandre Desplat – Little Women
Hildur Guðnadóttir – Joker
Randy Newman – Marriage Story
Thomas Newman – 1917
Robbie Robertson – The Irishman

TELEVISION

Best Drama Series

The Crown (Netflix)
David Makes Man (OWN)
Game of Thrones (HBO)
The Good Fight (CBS All Access)
Pose (FX)
Succession (HBO)
This Is Us (NBC)
Watchmen (HBO)

Best Actor in a Drama Series

Sterling K. Brown – This Is Us (NBC)
Mike Colter – Evil (CBS)
Paul Giamatti – Billions (Showtime)
Kit Harington – Game of Thrones (HBO)
Freddie Highmore – The Good Doctor (ABC)
Tobias Menzies – The Crown (Netflix)
Billy Porter – Pose (FX)
Jeremy Strong – Succession (HBO)

Best Actress in a Drama Series

Christine Baranski – The Good Fight (CBS All Access)
Olivia Colman – The Crown (Netflix)
Jodie Comer – Killing Eve (BBC America)
Nicole Kidman – Big Little Lies (HBO)
Regina King – Watchmen (HBO)
Mj Rodriguez – Pose (FX)
Sarah Snook – Succession (HBO)
Zendaya – Euphoria (HBO)

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Asante Blackk – This Is Us (NBC)
Billy Crudup – The Morning Show (Apple)
Asia Kate Dillon – Billions (Showtime)
Peter Dinklage – Game of Thrones (HBO)
Justin Hartley – This Is Us (NBC)
Delroy Lindo – The Good Fight (CBS All Access)
Tim Blake Nelson – Watchmen (HBO)

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Helena Bonham Carter – The Crown (Netflix)
Gwendoline Christie – Game of Thrones (HBO)
Laura Dern – Big Little Lies (HBO)
Audra McDonald – The Good Fight (CBS All Access)
Jean Smart – Watchmen (HBO)
Meryl Streep – Big Little Lies (HBO)
Susan Kelechi Watson – This Is Us (NBC)

Best Comedy Series

Barry (HBO)
Fleabag (Amazon)
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon)
Mom (CBS)
One Day at a Time (Netflix)
PEN15 (Hulu)
Schitt’s Creek (Pop)

Best Actor in a Comedy Series

Ted Danson – The Good Place (NBC)
Walton Goggins – The Unicorn (CBS)
Bill Hader – Barry (HBO)
Eugene Levy – Schitt’s Creek (Pop)
Paul Rudd – Living with Yourself (Netflix)
Bashir Salahuddin – Sherman’s Showcase (IFC)
Ramy Youssef – Ramy (Hulu)

Best Actress in a Comedy Series

Christina Applegate – Dead to Me (Netflix)
Alison Brie – GLOW (Netflix)
Rachel Brosnahan – The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon)
Kirsten Dunst – On Becoming a God in Central Florida (Showtime)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus – Veep (HBO)
Catherine O’Hara – Schitt’s Creek (Pop)
Phoebe Waller-Bridge – Fleabag (Amazon)

Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Andre Braugher – Brooklyn Nine-Nine (NBC)
Anthony Carrigan – Barry (HBO)
William Jackson Harper – The Good Place (NBC)
Daniel Levy – Schitt’s Creek (Pop)
Nico Santos – Superstore (NBC)
Andrew Scott – Fleabag (Amazon)
Henry Winkler – Barry (HBO)

Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Alex Borstein – The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel (Amazon)
D’Arcy Carden – The Good Place (NBC)
Sian Clifford – Fleabag (Amazon)
Betty Gilpin – GLOW (Netflix)
Rita Moreno – One Day at a Time (Netflix)
Annie Murphy – Schitt’s Creek (Pop)
Molly Shannon – The Other Two (Comedy Central)

Best Limited Series

Catch-22 (Hulu)
Chernobyl (HBO)
Fosse/Verdon (FX)
The Loudest Voice (Showtime)
Unbelievable (Netflix)
When They See Us (Netflix)
Years and Years (HBO)

Best Movie Made for Television

Brexit (HBO)
Deadwood: The Movie (HBO)
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie (Netflix)
Guava Island (Amazon)
Native Son (HBO)
Patsy & Loretta (Lifetime)

Best Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television

Christopher Abbott – Catch-22 (Hulu)
Mahershala Ali – True Detective (HBO)
Russell Crowe – The Loudest Voice (Showtime)
Jared Harris – Chernobyl (HBO)
Jharrel Jerome – When They See Us (Netflix)
Sam Rockwell – Fosse/Verdon (FX)
Noah Wyle – The Red Line (CBS)

Best Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television

Kaitlyn Dever – Unbelievable (Netflix)
Anne Hathaway – Modern Love (Amazon)
Megan Hilty – Patsy & Loretta (Lifetime)
Joey King – The Act (Hulu)
Jessie Mueller – Patsy & Loretta (Lifetime)
Merritt Wever – Unbelievable (Netflix)
Michelle Williams – Fosse/Verdon (FX)

Best Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television

Asante Blackk – When They See Us (Netflix)
George Clooney – Catch-22 (Hulu)
John Leguizamo – When They See Us (Netflix)
Dev Patel – Modern Love (Amazon)
Jesse Plemons – El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie (Netflix)
Stellan Skarsgård – Chernobyl (HBO)
Russell Tovey – Years and Years (HBO)

Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie Made for Television

Patricia Arquette – The Act (Hulu)
Marsha Stephanie Blake – When They See Us (Netflix)
Toni Collette – Unbelievable (Netflix)
Niecy Nash – When They See Us (Netflix)
Margaret Qualley – Fosse/Verdon (FX)
Emma Thompson – Years and Years (HBO)
Emily Watson – Chernobyl (HBO)

Best Animated Series

Big Mouth (Netflix)
BoJack Horseman (Netflix)
The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance (Netflix)
She-Ra and the Princesses of Power (Netflix)
The Simpsons (Fox)
Undone (Amazon)

Best Talk Show

Desus & Mero (Showtime)
Full Frontal With Samantha Bee (TBS)
The Kelly Clarkson Show (NBC)
Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (HBO)
The Late Late Show With James Corden (CBS)
Late Night With Seth Meyers (NBC)

Best Comedy Special

Amy Schumer: Growing (Netflix)
Jenny Slate: Stage Fright (Netflix)
Live in Front of a Studio Audience: Norman Lear’s All in the Family and The Jeffersons (ABC)
Ramy Youssef: Feelings (HBO)
Seth Meyers: Lobby Baby (Netflix)
Trevor Noah: Son of Patricia (Netflix)
Wanda Sykes: Not Normal (Netflix)

Joker Nominated for 4 Golden Globes, Watchmen Snubbed

Joker

Today, the nominees for the 77th Golden Globes were announced. Joker was nominated for four awards including “Best Motion Picture,” “Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama,” “Best Director – Motion Picture,” and “Best Original Score – Motion Picture.”

Joker crossed the billion-dollar mark in the last few weeks and the controversial film is one of the most profitable in history.

Watchmen, an expansion of the heralded comic, was snubbed in this year’s awards. The show which focuses on the generational trauma of an African-American family was one of the highest profile snubs, especially due to its praise.

Check out below for the full list of nominees.

Best Motion Picture – Drama

  • “The Irishman” (Netflix)
  • “Marriage Story” (Netflix)
  • “1917” (Universal)
  • “Joker” (Warner Bros.)
  • “The Two Popes” (Netflix)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

  • Cynthia Erivo (“Harriet”)
  • Scarlett Johansson (“Marriage Story”)
  • Saoirse Ronan (“Little Women”)
  • Charlize Theron (“Bombshell”)
  • Renée Zellweger (“Judy”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

  • Christian Bale (“Ford v Ferrari”)
  • Antonio Banderas (“Pain and Glory”)
  • Adam Driver (“Marriage Story”)
  • Joaquin Phoenix (“Joker”)
  • Jonathan Pryce (“The Two Popes”)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • “Dolemite Is My Name” (Netflix)
  • “Jojo Rabbit” (Fox Searchlight)
  • “Knives Out” (Lionsgate)
  • “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” (Sony)
  • “Rocketman” (Paramount)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • Ana de Armas (“Knives Out”)
  • Awkwafina (“The Farewell”)
  • Cate Blanchett (“Where’d You Go, Bernadette”)
  • Beanie Feldstein (“Booksmart”)
  • Emma Thompson (“Late Night”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • Daniel Craig (“Knives Out”)
  • Roman Griffin Davis (“Jojo Rabbit”)
  • Leonardo DiCaprio (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
  • Taron Egerton (“Rocketman”)
  • Eddie Murphy (“Dolemite Is My Name”)

Best Motion Picture – Animated

  • “Frozen 2” (Disney)
  • “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” (Universal)
  • “The Lion King” (Disney)
  • “Missing Link” (United Artists Releasing)
  • “Toy Story 4” (Disney)

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language

  • “The Farewell” (A24)
  • “Les Misérables” (Amazon)
  • “Pain and Glory” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • “Parasite” (Neon)
  • “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” (Neon)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

  • Kathy Bates (“Richard Jewell”)
  • Annette Bening (“The Report”)
  • Laura Dern (“Marriage Story”)
  • Jennifer Lopez (“Hustlers”)
  • Margot Robbie (“Bombshell”)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in Any Motion Picture

  • Tom Hanks (“A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”)
  • Anthony Hopkins (“The Two Popes”)
  • Al Pacino (“The Irishman”)
  • Joe Pesci (“The Irishman”)
  • Brad Pitt (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • Bong Joon-ho (“Parasite”)
  • Sam Mendes (“1917”)
  • Todd Phillips (“Joker”)
  • Martin Scorsese (“The Irishman”)
  • Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • Noah Baumbach (“Marriage Story”)
  • Bong Joon-ho and Han Jin-won (“Parasite”)
  • Anthony McCarten (“The Two Popes”)
  • Quentin Tarantino (“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”)
  • Steven Zaillian (“The Irishman”)

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

  • Alexandre Desplat (“Little Women”)
  • Hildur Guðnadóttir (“Joker”)
  • Randy Newman (“Marriage Story”)
  • Thomas Newman (“1917”)
  • Daniel Pemberton (“Motherless Brooklyn”)

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • “Beautiful Ghosts” (“Cats”)
  • “I’m Gonna Love Me Again” (“Rocketman”)
  • “Into the Unknown” (“Frozen 2”)
  • “Spirit” (“The Lion King”)
  • “Stand Up” (“Harriet”)

Best Television Series – Drama

  • “Big Little Lies” (HBO)
  • “The Crown” (Netflix)
  • “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
  • “The Morning Show” (Apple TV Plus)
  • “Succession” (HBO)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

  • Jennifer Aniston (“The Morning Show”)
  • Olivia Colman (“The Crown”)
  • Jodie Comer (“Killing Eve”)
  • Nicole Kidman (“Big Little Lies”)
  • Reese Witherspoon (“The Morning Show”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

  • Brian Cox (“Succession”)
  • Kit Harington (“Game of Thrones”)
  • Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”)
  • Tobias Menzies (“The Crown”)
  • Billy Porter (“Pose”)

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • “Barry” (HBO)
  • “Fleabag” (Amazon)
  • “The Kominsky Method” (Netflix)
  • “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)
  • “The Politician” (Netflix)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • Christina Applegate (“Dead to Me”)
  • Rachel Brosnahan (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”)
  • Kirsten Dunst (“On Becoming a God in Central Florida”)
  • Natasha Lyonne (“Russian Doll”)
  • Phoebe Waller-Bridge (“Fleabag”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

  • Michael Douglas (“The Kominsky Method”)
  • Bill Hader (“Barry”)
  • Ben Platt (“The Politician”)
  • Paul Rudd (“Living with Yourself”)
  • Ramy Youssef (“Ramy”)

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • “Catch-22″ (Hulu)
  • “Chernobyl” (HBO)
  • “Fosse/Verdon” (FX)
  • The Loudest Voice (Showtime)
  • “Unbelievable” (Netflix)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Kaitlyn Dever (“Unbelievable”)
  • Joey King (“The Act”)
  • Helen Mirren (“Catherine the Great”)
  • Merritt Wever (“Unbelievable”)
  • Michelle Williams (“Fosse/Verdon”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Christopher Abbott (“Catch-22”)
  • Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Spy”)
  • Russell Crowe (“The Loudest Voice”)
  • Jared Harris (“Chernobyl”)
  • Sam Rockwell (“Fosse/Verdon”)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Patricia Arquette (“The Act”)
  • Helena Bonham Carter (“The Crown”)
  • Toni Collette (“Unbelievable”)
  • Meryl Streep (“Big Little Lies”)
  • Emily Watson (“Chernobyl”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

  • Alan Arkin (“The Kominsky Method”)
  • Kieran Culkin (“Succession”)
  • Andrew Scott (“Fleabag”)
  • Stellan Skarsgård (“Chernobyl”)
  • Henry Winkler (“Barry”)

Around the Tubes

Roku #1

It’s new comic book day tomorrow! What’s everyone excited for? What do you plan on getting? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

iO9 – Watchmen‘s Ideas About Trauma and Legacy Are Making the Show More Mystifying – It’s a hell of a show and this is part of it.

Comicbook – Bernie Wrightson Comic Book Cover Estimated To Command Up To A Million Dollars At Auction – Well deserved.

Newsarama – DC Names New Publicity & Communications Director – Interesting move and congrats on the new position.

The Beat – Comics going uptown: The Color of Power: Heroes, Sheroes, & Their Creators exhibit opens November 16 – Sounds like an interesting exhibit.

The Comichron – October 2019 comics sales estimates: X-Men #1 launches near 256k copies – For those that enjoy the horse race.

Reviews

Newsarama – Fantastic Four #16
Comics Bulletin –
Roku #1

Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ Watchmen Soundtrack Comes to Spotify

HBO‘s Watchmen has been amazing in not just the story and acting but the soundtrack as well.

Composers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross have brought their unmistakable sound to the television show creating a haunting melody to go with the mystery. The two are award-winning composers who have created music for well over a hundred television and film productions and the two won an Oscar for their score to The Social Network.

You can now listen to the first volume of music on Spotify.

TV Review: Watchmen S1E2 Martial Feats of Comanche Horsemanship

Watchmen

Watchmen‘s second episode focuses on the fallout of the murder of the police captain Judd Crawford played by Don Johnson. The episode goes beyond that but also builds on its history of Tulsa as well as Angela Abar’s.

We learn about Angela’s history with Judd and her history with Judd. That history becomes closer due to the White Night, a coordinated attack by the 7th Cavalry murdering police officers. Through that we also find out about Abar’s children, who are the children of her former partner who was killed during the attack. It’s an interesting scene as it explains why an officer would be so close to her superior and also why the police now hide their identities.

The series continues to entwine itself into the history of the Tulsa Race Riot. It becomes clear as to why Judd was murdered as Angela discovers what looks like a KKK outfit in Crawford’s closet. We also discover Louis Gossett, Jr.’s Will Reeves is indeed the young boy from Tulsa as well as his connection to Angela.

What makes Reeves interesting is his talking in riddles which has the viewer parsing everything he has to say. It forces you to listen to the dialogue and question everything said. It puts the viewer in a similar position with Angela as she attempts to discover the truth.

We also learn more about Veidt and his servants. It’s now much clearer as to what’s going on and the oddness of them. It shows Veidt is up to his old tricks and has lost his mind even more than before. Is he still the villain?

The episode has a lot of revelations and adds depth to each of its characters in small moments and big ones as well. It also deepens the mystery as we, like Angela Abar, discover each new piece of information. For each answer, there’s so many more questions presented.

Watchmen is proving itself to be every bit the worthy successor of the original comic material delivering a layered story and fleshed out history. This is much watch television. One that deserves multiple viewings.

Overall Rating: 8.5

Watching the Watchmen. A Deep Dive Into “It’s Summer and We’re Running Out of Ice”

Watchmen

HBO‘s Watchmen has debuted and the first episode exceeded expectations. The show called for multiple viewings and deep examination of scenes, characters, scenery, and so much more.

Below is what stood out in the first episode… warning, spoilers!

Bass Reeves – The show opens with a silent film featuring Bass Reeves. Reeves was real and the first black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi. He mostly worked in Arkansas and Oklahoma. Reeves is rumored to be the inspiration for The Lone Ranger. The silent film features a masked Reeves with a rope around a white police officer’s neck bringing him to justice. It echoes the end of the episode where Don Johnson‘s Judd Crawford is hung by it looks like Louis Gossett, Jr.‘s Will Reeves.

Tulsa Race RiotWe’ve written about this real-world event. There’s a lot of solid details included like the soldier wearing a WWI uniform. Some of those who took up arms served in the war. The inclusion of the planes as well is a nice historical touch. This scene sets up the young boy at the end with the note and the baby he picks up. It’s likely that Louis Gossett, Jr.’s Will Reeves is this boy grown up as he has the note in his lap (he could be the baby instead). During the teaser, Reeves says he’s 105 years old which would make him about 7 years old during the riot. It also hints as to who Reeves might be.

Hooded Justice – Hooded Justice first appeared in 1938 in the Watchmen world as a vigilante. His identity is never revealed and there are enough contradictions it’s unclear as to who he might be. There’s a good chance that Reeves is indeed Hooded Justice. That’d make him 24 when he first became a hero so his character would be the right age to be a member of the Minutemen.

The show is one that also is about the details. Hooded Justice is seen on the side of the bus as Angela Abar heads to her business. Hooded Justice also is seen in the animated video playing behind Judd Crawford. There are strong hints that HJ plays a role in the show as he’s one of the few original heroes from the comic shown multiple times.

Hooded Justice also was a closeted gay man in the comics who faked dating Sally Jupiter. At one point Sally’s daughter Laurie believes HJ is her father. He was really in a relationship with Captain Metropolis. He’s the character who beats the Comedian for raping Sally. Laurie also is in the show as Laurie Blake, an FBI agent. Blake is the Comedian’s real-world last name.

Watchmen Smiley Face

Yellow bandanas on the police – The standard police officers cover their faces to protect their identity. The bandanas they use are yellow, like the iconic smiley face from Watchmen.

At the end of the episode we see blood dripping from Crawford’s body onto his badge. It’s similar to the blood drip on the Comedian’s smiley face pin in the original Watchmen.

The scene in the school – Angela Akbar is talking to a class about her cooking business. She initially makes eggs into a smiley face, a yellow one. Other things that are noticeable in this scene:

  • Vietnam is referred to as a state
  • Robert Redford is shown in a grouping of four important Presidents. Richard Nixon is next to him. In the trailer park, Nixon is a statue on the outside and a trailer says something negative about Redford. Later, Don Johnson’s Crawford is listening to talk radio where they’re talking negatively about Redford and a gun program.
  • A poster of a squid is shown in the back echoing the alien attack at the end of the Watchmen comic.
  • Reparations are mentioned which could be a reference to the Tulsa Race Riot which reparations were recommended for families impacted by it. It could also be a broader program involving slavery.

The squids – There’s the poster of the squid in the schoolroom and they fall from the sky like rain. It’s bad enough there’s a cleanup crew dedicated to them that we see working in a neighborhood. This is a reference to the “alien attack” that happened in the comic which looked like a giant squid. Later in an interrogation scene, there’s a mention of a government conspiracy about interdimensional attacks.

7th Cavalry – This was another nod to real-world history. The 7th Cavalry was lead by Custard and battled in Little Big Horn. This is why Angela Abar was texted that. There’s a lot of history with this military unit to unpack but they’re known for numerous battles against Native Americans.

Watchmen End is Nigh

Future is Bright – When Angela is going to her business a man is holding a sign that says “The Future is Bright.” This is the exact opposite of Rorschach’s “The End is Nigh” from the comics.

Jeremy Irons’ Adrian Veidt – Veidt is one of the few characters from the original comic. A newspaper article says Veidt is dead but he’s clearly not. He’s living in a castle with two servants who are most likely created by Veidt as part of whatever plan he has. Mr. Phillips, his butler, hands a horseshoe to cut a cake and Veidt’s look is one of confusion and disappointment as something is off. There’s rumors as to who these two characters might be but so far there’s no indication this is true.

Watch and clocks – The clock is an important motif of the original Watchmen. Veidt is given one as a present. In the next scene during a dinner between Crawford and Abar, the overhead shot looks like a clock. 7th Cavalry is after watch batteries. We hear tic-toc in numerous scenes.

Unanswered questions:

  • Why does everyone think Veidt is dead?
  • When Don Johnson’s Crawford is leaving from his home a picture is shown that we assume is him and his father. Whatever history is there might be why he’s killed.
  • Why was Oklahoma chosen for the musical other than the show takes place there? I just don’t know the musical much.
  • The police have an Owlship. Is this the new heavy armored vehicle like real-world police are buying from the military?

Visual standouts:

  • There’s the shift from Veidt and the watch to the dinner with the chandelier looking like a watch.
  • The overturned truck at the end of the Tulsa scene looks like the front windows of the Owlship.
  • When the kids at the end of the Tulsa scene are looking at the burning city you can see the title of the episode a bit above them as the viewer is situated behind the title.

So, that’s everything that stood out to me. What’d I miss? What stood out to you?

Around the Tubes

Watchmen

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are excited for? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: In Ghost Teller, the ghosts tell the stories – Free comics!

The Mary Sue – Watchmen Getting Review Bombed for Being “Too Woke”? Do Y’all Even Know Watchmen? – The real question is, who reads the Watchmen? Not these people apparently!

The Hollywood Reporter – Marvel TV Topper Jeph Loeb to Exit – This isn’t too surprising. The fact it’s been so long is considering the many missteps along the way.

Reviews

Comics Bulletin – Count Crowley: Reluctant Midnight Monster Hunter #1
Newsarama –
Marauders #1
IGN –
Marauders #1

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