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DC Reveals First Look of The Other History of the DC Universe Book Five

Since its 2020 debut, the five-issue limited series The Other History of the DC Universe has received critical and fan acclaim for its examination of the DC Universe through the eyes of superheroes outside the prevailing culture, and against the backdrop of real-world events.

The first issue of this unique series focused on Jefferson Pierce, a.k.a. Black Lightning as he finds his path to heroism as Olympic gold medalist, teacher, neighborhood activist and finally, super hero. It’s only fitting that The Other History of the DC Universe concludes with a spotlight of his super-powered offspring, Thunder.

Being a superhero runs in Anissa Pierce’s family. It’s been a part of her life in one way or another since her father, Jefferson Pierce, first started to fight crime as Black Lightning. Despite what her parents tell her, despite what the world tells her, Anissa knows that she has the same calling as her father. But as Anissa takes on the mantle of Thunder, she must grapple with a very different world than the one that her father first patrolled.

The Other History of the DC Universe Book Five is out July 27 from writer John Ridley, art by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Andrea Cucchi, cover by Camuncoli and Marco Mastrazzo, and variant cover by Jamal Campbell.

Review: The Other History of the DC Universe #4

The Other History of the DC Universe #4 is an interesting shift in the series. While previous issues have examined the DC Universe, this issue takes us in and out of the comic world to the real world discussing real events and issues through a comic lens.

Discover the 1990s and 2000s through the eyes of Renee Montoya.

Story: John Ridley
Layouts: Giuseppe Camuncoli
Finishes: Andrea Cucchi
Color: José Villarrubia
Letterer: Steve Wands

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin #3

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Black Friday #2 (Scout Comics/Black Caravan) – Something is trying to come up through the floor. An evil has festered due to the violence of previous Black Fridays and the staff of Star-Mart will need to survive what’s coming. Fantastic horror and a must for fans of the genre.

Black Widow #7 (Marvel) – The series has been amazing so far with a great mix of everything. The writing is top-notch, the action entertaining, and the art is amazing. One of Marvel’s best series out now.

The Blue Flame #1 (Vault Comics) – A new take on the superhero genre. The Blue Flame must prove humanity is worth saving before a universal trial but the hero must save himself first.

Made in Korea #1 (Image Comics) – A series that explores the concept of artificial intelligence. Check out our glowing review.

Mister Miracle: The Source of Freedom #1 (DC Comics) – Spinning out of Future State, this is the story of how Shilo Norman became Mister Miracle.

The Other History of the DC Universe #4 (DC Comics) – John Ridley turns his exploration into the DC Universe towards Renee Montoya.

Redshift #1 (Scout Comics) – The Ministry of Exploration pins mankind’s last hope on an astronaut who’s scared of space. It’s a tale of survival for all.

Reptil #1 (Marvel) – Not a character we expected to get the spotlight but we’re intrigued to see what’s done here.

Robin #2 (DC Comics) – The first issue was a lot of fun. There was a solid mix of humor and action and the second issue is just as fun. So much added to Damian as far as depth of the character already.

Shadow Doctor #4 (AfterShock) – The amazing true story about a Black doctor in the 1930s who had to turn to his friend Al Capone to help fund his business.

Shadowman #2 (Valiant Entertainment) – The first issue was fantastic and a great reintroduction to the character. The debut got universal praise from our team and we’re all excited to see where the series goes from there.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin #3 (IDW Publishing) – We’ve been eagerly waiting for the issue as the series has been delivering entertainment with each release. It’s a familiar grizzled take but the setting and story itself really stands out with really unique elements.

Preview: The Other History of the DC Universe #4

The Other History of the DC Universe #4

Written by: John Ridley
Art by: Giuseppe Camuncoli

Words can be tricky. Renee Montoya has known this for most of her life. Words taught her to feel ashamed of her gender, her sexuality, and her ethnicity. The people of Gotham City taught her to hide who she was to fit in to, be loved, and in doing so, they taught her to hate herself. But from that despair came something unexpected and powerful.

Renee’s path from a closeted police officer in the 1990s to her time as the faceless vigilante known as the Question is one that is inextricably linked with queerness. It is one that is defiant of binaries, outmoded and hateful stereotypes, and the words that propagate them. As the Question, Renee stood in contrast to society’s rigid expectations of her, held a mirror up to the world’s face, and asked, “Who are you?”

The long-awaited miniseries written by Academy Award-winning screenwriter John Ridley (12 Years a Slave, Let It Fall) and beautifully illustrated by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Andrea Cucchi continues to explore the mythology of the DC Universe, as seen through the prism of DC Super Heroes from historically disenfranchised groups.

The Other History of the DC Universe #4

Review: The Other History of the DC Universe #3

The Other History of the DC Universe #3 is an interesting shift from the first two issues. This is more of a focus on the myth superheroes build about themselves with Katana as the focus. It’s a graphic essay and a graduate course in DC history.

Story: John Ridley
Layouts: Giuseppe Camuncoli
Finishes: Andrea Cucchi
Color: José Villarrubia
Letterer: Steve Wands

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Around the Tubes

The Other History of the DC Universe #3

It’s new comic book day! What are you all getting? What are you excited to read? Sound off in the comments below! While you think about that and wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web to start your day.

Smash Pages – CCI responds to criticism of their planned Thanksgiving weekend event – Bets if it’ll even happen?

DC – The Flash: Jordan Fisher Joins the Cast as Bart Allen – Any speedsters they haven’t cast yet?

Kotaku – Activision Blizzard Hires Former Trump Administration Member Once Decried As ‘Bully’ – Grrrr…

Reviews

Talking Comics – Black Knight: Curse of the Ebony Blade #1
Geek Dad – Inferior Five #5
Geek Dad – The Other History of the DC Universe #3

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Avengers: Curse of the Man-Thing #1

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Avengers: Curse of the Man-Thing #1 (Marvel) – Writer Steve Orlando takes Man-Thing through a journey in this mini-series celebrating the character.

Beta Ray Bill #1 (Marvel) – Can Beta Ray Bill finally get the spotlight he deserves?

Crossover #5 (Image Comics) – The series has gone back and forth across line of being a bit too self-referential and inside jokes but it’s a hell of a concept and it’s interesting to see what else the team folds in.

Nuclear Family #2 (AfterShock) – The first issue was intriguing and left us in the middle of a bombed-out American town. What is going on!?

The Other History of the DC Universe #3 (DC Comics) – The series has been impressive at how honest it’s been with each issue. This one takes on Katana during the 80s!

Power Rangers Unlimited: Heir to Darkness #1 (BOOM! Studios) – The popular villain Astronema gets the spotlight as her origin is revealed.

Shadecraft #1 (Image Comics) – Zadie Lu is convinced that the shadows are trying to kill her and something weird is going on in her small town.

Silk #1 (Marvel) – A character that always deserved to be a bigger deal than she was, we’ll see if this miniseries is finally the one to put her over the top and cement A-status.

Two Moons #2 (Image Comics) – This horror series set during the Civil War had a solid debut and we want to see where it goes from there.

Witchblood #1 (Vault Comics) – A modern story of a witch cruising the Southwest as a gang of biker vampires wants the source of her coven’s power.

Young Hellboy: The Hidden Land #2 (Dark Horse) – The first issue had a fun pulp sense about it and we’re hoping for more of that.

Preview: The Other History of the DC Universe #3

The Other History of the DC Universe #3

Written by: John Ridley
Art by: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Andrea Cucchi

1983. Japan. Tatsu Yamashiro’s life has been taken from her. Her home, her children, her husband are all gone. With nothing left but a burning pain and the sword that stole her family from her, Tatsu begins a long journey of healing, self-discovery, agency, and rebirth. This is the story of Tatsu Yamashiro, the woman known to many as Katana-a hero who became more than the world ever intended for her, ultimately making a family of like-minded Outsiders who rally together for the common good amidst xenophobia and oppression. The long-awaited miniseries written by Academy Award-winning screenwriter John Ridley (12 Years a Slave, Let It Fall) and beautifully illustrated by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Andrea Cucchi continues to look at the mythology of the DC Universe as seen through the prism of DC Super Heroes who come from traditionally disenfranchised groups.

The Other History of the DC Universe #3

Review: The Other History of the DC Universe #2

The Other History of the DC Universe #2

In The Other History of the DC Universe‘s debut, writer John Ridley planted a flag with a raw, emotional, and blunt take on DC’s superhero history. The debut was not only a celebration of the history but it’s the type of reflection on it that we see today with our own real experiences. The comic didn’t examine it with rose-colored glasses, instead, it delivered a perspective and truth that stands up and feels justified. It was like a band-aid being ripped off to show a still festering wound. The Other History of the DC Universe #2 that direction with a shift of a focus to the Teen Titans.

Told from the dual perspectives of Karen Beecher-Duncan (Bumblee) and Mal Duncan, we’re taken from their early years in Metropolis through the history of their time with the Teen Titans and then Titans. I’m not personally too knowledgeable with either character, so Ridley’s take is just new history for me as a whole. Karen and Mal, like the first issue, show the white-centered team for what it was and don’t pull punches. Drama, drug use, abuse, these are some of the topics touched upon. But, it’s the second class citizen nature of Mal and Karen’s membership that really stands out.

Mal rightly comes back to the fact that as much as he was there for the team, the team was rarely there for Mal or Karen. They missed their wedding, they saw Mal as nothing more than a maintenance person, there feels like a rooted racist aspect of the team. When they initial met, the Teen Titans were hiding in one of Metropolis’ crime infested areas as if no one would care about anyone in these areas. We’re taken through the history of the Teen Titans, then Titans, as they break up and get back together, ignoring Mal and Karen throughout the years except when they could use their help.

But beyond the Titans, the comic is also an examination of the relationship of the two individuals. We get to experience their ups and downs. There’s high and lows with all of the human emotion one would expect. There’s drama throughout the education. While we’re teased the Titan’s drama, we get to experience Mal and Karen’s.

Ridley delivers what feels like a very interesting critique at DC as a whole. Not just the comics but the publisher itself. The comics feel like a graphic thesis paper on the depiction of minorities in literature and entertainment. This is a series that’s going to spur discussion for quite some time.

Like the first issue, The Other History of the DC Universe #2 has a graphic essay feel about it. Breaking from “traditional” comic layouts, the comic breaks from the usual panels that are expected. The result is a read that feels like journal entries enhanced with beautiful art. Giuseppe Camuncoli‘s layouts with Andrea Cucchi‘s finishes are impressive. The art is just amazing, along with the color from José Villarrubia and lettering by Steve Wands. There’s so much packed in with art that plays as homage to classic scenes and styles. There’s some pages that feel like they’re ripped from the original material, it all brings back memories.

The Other History of the DC Universe #2 is another fantastic and amazing issue. The series is calling out the failures of DC Comics’ history and the issues with its narratives. It’s impressive the publisher would do this at all. The fact it’s all at such a high quality is such a treat. Each issue feels like it’s a college level course in DC comic history. Time for all of us to get schooled.

Story: John Ridley Layouts: Giuseppe Camuncoli Finishes: Andrea Cucchi
Color: José Villarrubia Letterer: Steve Wands
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonKindleZeus Comics

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

The Other History of the DC Universe

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman: Black & White #2 (DC Comics) – Amazing art made the first issue stand out and we’re hoping for more of the same with the second.

Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1 (Source Point Press) – Three friends are brought back together when they find themselves in the crosshairs of a local drug dealer.

The Eighth Immortal #1 (Source Point Press) – And immortal must choose between protecting humanity and her own sanity.

I Survived Vol. 3 Nazi Invasion 1944 (Graphix) – In a Jewish ghetto, Max Rosen and his sister, Zena, struggle to live after their father is taken away by the Nazis.

Kaiju Score #3 (AfterShock) – Things are of course going sideways when it comes to the heist and it’s thankfully entertaining watching things go wrong.

Loot #1 (Scout Comics/Scoot) – Emily D. Jackson works for her newly retired mom in loss prevention at a big box superstore by day and turns her passion for theft into part-time treasure hunting on the side.

Nailbiter Returns #9 (Image Comics) – The series has been a fantastic “horror sequel” taking all of the tropes and expectations of being one and mixing it up. If you’re a fan of the genre, the series as a whole is worth checking out.

The Other History of the DC Universe #2 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – The first issue was jaw dropping and the second has us just as impressed. This series continues to look at the history of DC through the perspective of its minority characters. This issue, the Teen Titans.

Stake #1 (Scout Comics) – As a member of the Vampire Bounty Hunter Union, and with the help of her ancient vampiric mentor Jessamy, Angel’s out to track down the bloodthirsty monsters who destroyed her life.

Strange Academy #7 (Marvel) – The series has been a lot of fun with fantastic artwork. The danger is increasing now as we’re past the introduction and this is becoming one of Marvel’s best regular releases.

Taarna #2 (Heavy Metal) – The first issue delivered a cosmic trippy story and we’re excited to see where this series goes from here. With solid visuals and grand scope, the series feels like an homage to Jack Kirby.

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