Tag Archives: squirrel girl

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Enters Marvel Contest of Champions

Some may scoff at Doreen Green when they meet her, but she uses her squirrel-like abilities and positive attitude to take down some notably intimidating foes. Squirrel Girl is now available on Kabam’s Marvel Contest of Champions.

Doreen Green’s squirrel-like abilities made her an outsider in her teenage years. She escaped the insults of her classmates by hiding in the woods, among the squirrels. With the help of her good friend Tippy Toe, Squirrel Girl has taken down some of the most feared Super Villains in the universe. With an almost unrivaled win record, she lives up to the title, the “Unbeatable Squirrel Girl.”

The Champion’s spotlight is here if you’d like to know about this character’s abilities and stats.

Messages from Midgard #6: Cute Baby Laussa

The “War of the Realms” takes a break this week from the main heroes and blockbuster trappings to tell smaller, quirky stories that are varying degrees of fun. The McElroys bring the road trip banter in War of the Realms: Journey into Mystery #2, and Andre Araujo gets to take a break from advanced technology and gory fight scenes to be a humor cartoonist. War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #1 is one of the first tie-ins to remember that this event has a global scope, and Greg Pak and Gang Hyuk-Lim introduce Marvel’s first Filipina hero, Wave, although the story comes apart at the seams sometimes. I tip my hat to Pak and Lim for introducing more Asian heroes to the main Marvel Universe, and hopefully we get to hear for them after three issues. And Unbeatable Squirrel Girl continues to be a sweet cinnamon roll of a comic that I hope Marvel never cancels. (Thank you Scholastic book club marketing!)

War of the Realms: Journey into Mystery #2

With the boring team assembling part out of the way, the McElroys, Andre Araujo, and colorist Chris O’Halloran are free to write and draw road trip hijinks after a quick prelude showing why Ares is working for Sindr and after Thor’s baby sister, Laussa. The McElroys settle into writing this truly odd assortment of characters in Journey into Mystery #2, and honestly, I could read a whole ongoing series of them traipsing through the Marvel Universe and arguing about personal space, the fact that no one on the team can drive except Kate Bishop (Kudos to Miles Morales for doing driver’s ed next semester though.), and Thori being fierce.

The McElroys and Araujo don’t force a fight with Ares just yet and have the team stop at “Bide-A-Wee” trailer park because, again, no one except Kate Bishop can drive. Araujo draws the denizens of the trailer park in a stiff manner like they’re pretending to be human. This makes sense because they are actually Skrulls. (Of course, the McElroys use this fact to get in some licks at Secret Invasion.) And, then, there’s the requisite action scene that Araujo and O’Halloran make fun with some creative shapeshifting and pink arrows for Kate. However, the sequence is resolved in a very un-War of the Realms way. But what do you expect from a creative team that made changing a dirty diaper both hilarious and suspenseful.

If we had to fight a War of the Realms to get this fun buddy road trip story from the McElroys and Andre Araujo, it will have been worth it. This comic definitely feels like it was written by a bunch of guys who have probably been in enclosed spaces with each other for a long time whether that’s childhood road trips or doing live podcast shows for rabid fans. Throw in a sense of wonder, humor, and love for cute babies interacting with Helhounds, and Journey into Mystery #2 an overall verdict of Buy.

War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #1

Through his elevation of Amadeus Cho to the Hulk and especially a four issue arc of Totally Awesome Hulk where Cho teams up with other Asian-American superheroes, Greg Pak has used his clout as a writer to push for more Asian and Asian-American superheroes in Marvel Comics. He and artist Gang Hyuk Lim turn that up to eleven in War of the Realms: New Agents of Atlas #1, which features appearances from Marvel’s first Filipina hero Wave, the Chinese hero Aero, and Korean heroes Crescent and Io and Luna Snow, who were popular in the Marvel Future Fight mobile game and make their first comic appearance here. It’s cool to see these characters and their unique abilities get the spotlight, but Pak struggles to juggle such a large ensemble cast in one issue. Lim’s art is also fairly pedestrian even though there are pops of color from Federico Blee like when Crescent sics his magic bear Io on some Fire Goblins.

In New Agents of Atlas #1’s back matter, Pak says that he wanted to use the book to explore the “diversity within diversity” having Asian and Asian-American from different countries and backgrounds interact while defending the continent from Sindr and Fire Goblins. And he pulls this off in one fantastic scene where Jimmy Woo, the leader of Agents of Atlas, asks Amadeus Cho, Kamala Khan, Silk, and Shang Chi what kind of pear he’s holding. Depending on their background, they say it’s a Korean, Chinese, or Japanese pear because Kamala has only seen that kind of pear at the Japanese grocery.

However, the lesson is that the kind of pear doesn’t matter, and Woo says that the important thing is that they work together as a team. They proceed to not do this with Kamala and Amadeus constantly bickering about some Champions business, which leads to their plane crashing outside Seoul and a fight against the Korean superheroes, not Sindr’s forces. Pak and Lim nail Amadeus Cho’s egotism as he flexes his muscles and showboats throughout the comic and impetuously launches himself into battle without regard for his teammates. However, the scene where the newly minted Agents of Atlas fight the Korean superheroes is very rushed as White Fox immediately assumes that Amadeus Cho is bad because he had a Hulk incident a while back. It’s a good illustration of the pointless drama that gets in the way of teamwork, but with an emphasis on the “pointless” part.

Luna Snow, who Silk fangirls over because she’s a hero and a K-Pop star, Crescent and Io, and a cool surprise character have visually distinct abilities, but Gang Hyuk Lim is too married to the Marvel house style to really let them shine. This is a book that could have used the stylized touch of a Takeshi Miyazawa, who collaborate with Greg Pak on his creator owned comic Mech Cadet Yu, or David Lafuente. With its introduction of new heroes and soapy team dynamic, New Agents of Atlas has tantalizing potential even if this first issue doesn’t completely deliver so it earns the Overall Verdict of Read.

Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #44

Arguably, the best “War of the Realms” tie-in continues as writer Ryan North, artist Derek Charm, and colorist Rico Renzi have Squirrel Girl team up with Ratatoskr, the Norse squirrel god of chaos against Frost Giants and then frighten the citizens of rural Alberta. North and Charm do a good job laying out Ratatoskr’s motivation as she sees that Malekith ruling all ten realms would lead to conformity and boredom, which is the opposite of chaos. So, she’s fighting Frost Giants although in a flashback, she did give a thumbs up to Mangog, the destroyer of Asgard. Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #44 is really an exercise in ethics as Ratatoskr tries to cross lines, but Squirrel Girl holds her back and tries to keep everything even kneeled. However, this backfires.

Like every issue in this series, Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #44 is a dense comic filled with jokes, extended riffs, footnote jokes, and kick-ass fight scenes. What could have been just a simple fight between Squirrel Girl and two Frost Giants ends up with Ratatoskr giving an update on what she has been up to over the past 30 issues or so while imprisoned in Asgard as well as some jokes about how Frost Giants see humans as action figures and superhumans as rare ones. They’re still looking for the rare action figures with kung fu grips though.

Once the Giants go down, North and Charm go into full fish out of water mode with Ratatoskr, who is trying to blend in with the locals, but ends up as a femme fatale in rural Canada and does not pass for human. She has great fashion sense, and North and Charm get to sneak in jokes about video game palette swaps, Sailor Moon, and draw a squirrel ear wearing Spider-Man costume while she picks her look. Also, in her interactions with the regular folks of Alberta, she chooses the chaotic option over the safe one and ends up getting in random guys’ faces. This scene also illustrates the classic principles that humans hate and fear what they don’t understand as the Albertans turn on Squirrel Girl and Ratatoskr, once they realize that “they’re not from around here”.

Ryan North, Derek Charm, and Rico Renzi seem to be having a hell of time combining Squirrel Girl’s morality and empathy with Ratatoskr’s penchant for chaos and manipulation. It’s an instant source of drama and mischief and gives Charm the chance to draw “resting evil face”. Also, for its dedication to fun, good comedy, complex baddies, adorable art, and expressive, flat colors, Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #44 gets an overall verdict of Buy.


Although the quality of this week’s three comics does fluctuate, Journey into Mystery, New Agents of Atlas, and Unbeatable Squirrel Girl use the backdrop of “War of the Realms” not as a crutch, but as a freedom to tell road trip, Asian superhero team-up, and odd couple stories. Frost Giants are coming through portals so why not bring back the entertaining villain Ratatoskr from a few years back to mess with Squirrel Girl and use her divine abilities to troll mere mortals. A book like New Agents of Atlas could use its own series to build up the new characters, but Journey into Mystery and Unbeatable Squirrel Girl uses the events of “War of the Realms” as jumping on points for comedic misadventures. This week is a breath of fresh air after all the melodrama, gore, and Frank Castleness of previous “War of the Realms” tie-ins.

Panel of the Week

I don’t know what beef Malekith has with Shakespearean English. (Art by Derek Charm and Rico Renzi from Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #44.)

Recreate the Adventures with Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors Figures from Hasbro this October

Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors debuts Sunday, September 30 on Disney and Disney XD and you’ll be able to recreate the show yourself with figures from Hasbro.

The figures are 11-inch scale and not only sport the outfits of the characters but also 15 points of articulation.

Figures include Ms. Marvel, Squirrel Girl, America Chavez, Ghost-Spider, Quake, Inferno, and Patriot. Each has their own accessories and Tippy-Toe is included too!

The figures are out this October first at Target, followed by Disney Stores and the Hasbro shop.

Unboxing: Loot Crate Presents Marvel Gear + Goods “Take the Lead”

Loot Crate has a box for Marvel fans with the Loot Crate Presents Marvel Gear + Goods! You get official Marvel apparel, collectible goods every 2 months starting at $39.99.

This month’s box celebrates some of the awesome women of Marvel and their “taking the lead.”

Supplies are limited order the next box now!

 

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Funko Specialty Series: Squirrel Girl Dorbz & Gargoyles Hudson Pop! this Summer

Every store deserves an amazing Funko exclusive!

In an effort to recognize their most special accounts and loyal retailers, Funko is continuing their Specialty Series. Every month, they announce two major exclusives – this month includes a Dorbz and Pop!

Why is it so special? You’ll only be able to find these Specialty Series exclusives in boutique retail, specialty stores, local comic book shops and from qualified online retailers. This is your chance to help support local businesses and smaller retailers, and you’ll pick up an amazing exclusive item in the process!

The latest exclusives are a Squirrel Girl Dorbz and Gargoyles Hudson Pop!

Remember, these two fantastic pieces are exclusive to the Specialty Series. So pay a visit to your favorite specialty store or your local comic book shop and let them know to order the Specialty Series from Funko.

Dorbz: Marvel – Squirrel Girl
Please Note: Final Images Coming Soon.

Pop! Disney: Gargoyles – Hudson

Please Note: Final Images Coming Soon.

Review: Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #26

SquirrelGirlCoverUnbeatable Squirrel Girl takes a little break in issue 26 for a special in-universe zine comic written and drawn by various heroes, villains, and denizens of the Marvel Universe. In real life, they are all written by Ryan North with Erica Henderson switching roles with her Jughead collaborator Chip Zdarsky to pen a surprisingly sultry Howard the Duck story. It’s a fun sampler that mostly hit and very little miss from the much vaunted series of three panel Galactus gag strips by Garfield‘s Jim Davis to Anders Nilsen and Soren Iverson’s poignant story of Wolverine befriending a Sentinel and shotgunning a beer with his adamantium claws. The series Unbeatable Squirrel Girl has a lot of fantastic action, jokes, and the occasional superhero parody, but it’s a book where Doreen listens to both her opponents and allies and tries to work things out with eating nuts and kicking butts. S

So, it’s fitting, we get this comic that is written by a wacky range of POVs beginning with Squirrel Girl herself who stutters through the intro about his being a fundraiser zine. We get to listen to Kraven, hear Spider-Man’s retort, and see the world through Tippytoe’s eyes, which is drawn and colored in an adorable manner  Madeline McGrane’s art and colors make this frame story definitely look like a zine you might pick up at the local coffee shop or one of those fancy schmancy zine stores in bigger stories. It’s followed up by Chip Zdarsky going the closest he’ll ever get to his work on Sex Criminals in a mainstream comic with Erica Henderson doubling as a film noir director, but more awkward. They use close-ups and small panels of Howard the Duck and his femme fatale/client like they’re egging Marvel editorial to linger on this scene more while adding a funny caption. Zdarsky doing Big Two interiors is a big treat, and he barely holds back.

Tom Fowler’s Brain Drain story is a nice showcase of the underrated Unbeatable Squirrel Girl supporting character and hews the closest to Henderson’s usual style on the book. His take on Brain Drain is philosophical, adorable, and structured like the computer science programs that the character loves. It’s oddly motivational too and worth a reread thanks to its erudite writing style. Speaking of rereads, Carla Speed McNeil draws a Loki comic that only makes sense forwards and backwards and is a great example of how the comics medium allows for flexibility of meaning using Loki as a litmus test. It’s a wonderful double page spread, and the best Loki story since Journey into Mystery.

After this, Michael Cho draws a Kraven the Hunter comic/Spider-Man diss story, which is a pretty fun riff off “Kraven’s Last Hunt” and features dead presidents. His art has a light hearted old school vibe while having a subversive take on superhero/supervillain relationships kind of like the main Unbeatable Squirrel Girl title, but from the bad guy’s perspective. It’s followed up by a one page retort from Spider-Man with some gorgeous, yet still funny digital painting work from Rahzzah, who teams up later in the book to do Nancy Whitehead’s photo collage comic with the help of North, who channels Dinosaur Comics in the strip. It’s a well-designed remix story that will make the non-artists reading this comic smile and the kind of mash-up that you would find in a real zine.

NilsonWolverine

But the heavy hitter of the bunch is Anders Nilsen and Soren Iverson’s Wolverine story that is fitting for an artist who had done a comic called Poetry is Useless. Anders Nilsen has a minimalist Euro style perfect for a comic about Wolverine getting talked out of killing a Sentinel, who challenges him to look past his shiny mutant killing exterior and team up with him to beat up some kaiju. (Sadly, this part of the story is off panel.) Wolverine gets a big epiphany moment when he realizes that he’s “hating and fearing” the Sentinel just like the X-Men have been treated for most of their career. This story is proof that more Fantagraphics and Drawn and Quarterly guys should draw superhero comics.

Following this weighty, yet fun story is a couple of candy confections. Unbeatable Squirrel Girl colorist Rico Renzi draws an adorable and faux edgy Batman parody starring the one and only Tippytoe. It pokes fun at Batman’s angsty backstory as well as the fact that Tippytoe always plays second banana. Renzi’s art style is similar to the cartoon The Amazing World of Gumball with lush digital backgrounds and colors. Finally, Jim Davis, whose work I was familiar with eons before I ever opened a Marvel comic, transposes the classic Garfield and Jon relationship to Galactus and the Silver Surfer. It’s the same dad-ish, three panel punchline jokes, but told in a more cosmic key, and Davis has a lot of fun showing Galactus doing his planet devouring, face stuffing thing. His literal eye popping Silver Surfer has a similar manic energy to Robin Williams’ Genie in Disney’s Aladdin.

Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #26 is a real treat as independent cartoonists, the creator of Garfield, and even the book’s colorist get to take a stab at some of the more familiar faces in the Marvel Universe while also giving Squirrel Girl’s supporting cast a moment in the sun. It’s sometimes poignant and always funny.

Story: Ryan North, Erica Henderson Art: Madeline McGrane, Chip Zdarsky, Tom Fowler, Carla Speed McNeil, Michael Cho, Anders Nilsen, Rico Renzi, Jim Davis Colors: Madeline McGrane, Chip Zdarsky, Rico Renzi, Rahzzah,Soren Iverson
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.0 Overall:9.2 Recommendation: Read

Marvel and Freeform Find Their New Warriors

One of the announcements I had predicted for San Diego Comic-Con was the unveiling of the cast for Marvel and Freeform‘s New Warriors television show. A week early the information has dropped with some fantastic additions and what looks to be a solid group.

Comedian and actress Milana Vayntrub has landed one of the most coveted roles out there as she steps into the tail of Squirrel Girl. There’s been lots of speculation as to who would play the lead character with some pretty high profile actresses publically vying for the spot.

Joining Vayntrub is Derek Theler as Mister Immortal, Jeremy Tardy as Night Thrasher, Calum Worthy as Speedball, Matthew Moy as Microbe, and Kate Comer as Debrii.

The series is Marvel’s first live action comedy and one of two live action series to debut on the channel from the multimedia company, the other being Cloak & Dagger. The show was picked up straight to series and will launch in 2018.

(via The Hollywood Reporter)

Squirrel Girl and the New Warriors Come to Freeform in a New Live-Action Comedy

Freeform, Marvel, and ABC (all are owned by Disney) have announced a new television project, Marvel’s New Warriors. The television series is the second Marvel project for the television and is a comedic live-action adaptation, the first comedy for Marvel on television. The series has been picked up for ten 30-minute episodes and will debut in 2018.

Marvel’s New Warriors is about six young people with powers living and working together. With powers and abilities on the opposite end of the spectrum of The Avengers, the New Warriors want to make a difference in the world … even if the world isn’t ready. Not quite super, not yet heroes, Marvel’s New Warriors is about that time in your life when you first enter adulthood and feel like you can do everything and nothing at once – except in this world, bad guys can be as terrifying as bad dates.

The series will feature fan-favorite “Squirrel Girl” (Doreen Green) as a totally empowering fan girl— tough, optimistic and a natural leader. Doreen is confident and has the powers of a squirrel … She’s acrobatic, can fight and talk to other squirrels. Her most important trait is that she has faith in people and teaches them to believe in themselves. Additional cast to be announced.

Freeform also has Marvel’s Cloak & Dagger underway at the network. Can a crossover be far behind?

The series is co-produced by Marvel Television and ABC Signature Studios. Marvel’s Jeph Loeb, and Jim Chory serve as executive producers on the series.

The New Warriors debuted in 1989 in The Mighty Thor #411 and Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz are created with their creation. The team has numerous versions with a rotating roster. It’s unknown who will be a part of this version. While Squirrel Girl hasn’t been on the team she was a part of a version of the team that appeared on the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon series.

Review: Deadpool: Too Soon? #1

deadpool-too-soon-1-coverDeadpool: Too Soon? #1 is insane in the best possible way from the first panel to the last. This issue showcases everything you love about the Merc with a Mouth. If this is your first foray into the world of Deadpool it’s a good start and you won’t be disappointed. Issue #1 of this arc treats us to more guest stars than you can shake a katana at and while Squirrel Girl, The Punisher, Spider-Ham, Howard the Duck, Ant-Man, Forbush Man, and Rocket & Groot seem like they wouldn’t be in the same comic book, in any part of the multiverse or on any timeline, it seems to work.

Deadpool, aka “the reason you’re reading this comic book” and Shiklah join together an elite (or as Deadpool puts it, the funniest) team of superheroes for a super secret mission. Someone has murdered the Forbush Man! Could someone be targeting some of the Marvel Universe’s funniest heroes for death? That’s certainly what Deadpool thinks – and he’s gathered a number of characters in a spooky old mansion (naturally) to help crack the case. Good thing Deadpool is known for his world-renowned investigative skills! But as more bodies start turning up, can these heroes solve the mystery before their goose is cooked?

Joshua Corin‘s writing is on point and is in line with the Deadpool brand. It’s quick and clever and I loved every word of it. Corin takes some of the most humorous , and one of the most deadly, characters in the Marvel universe and gives the readers something to laugh about. Even though the content is hella dark the delivery feels natural & unforced. The dialogue and interaction are exactly what you would want them to be in a mash up involving such a motley crew. No on acts out of character and it all seems extraordinarily natural and organic. Corin gives the readers a quick, page-turning read and the only problem I had with it is that it was over too soon.

Todd Nauck‘s artwork is on point, the detail is amazing and we get some pretty cool retro panels in The Avengers super secret underground lair. We are treated to art that looks like it’s moving and allows the reader to get caught up in the action. Not a frame is wasted and it feels more like a TV show or a movie than like a comic book and that’s not a bad thing. The visuals are on point with and, keep up with the sharp dialogue that Corin provides.

Overall this issue was everything I wanted and more than I expected. It was a nice call back to the comic books of my youth and reminded me of what I loved about comic books as a kid. It was cohesive, smart, well written., expertly drawn and a perfect start to a story arc. I look forward to seeing how this story plays out and if it keeps ending on such hard and enticing twists. I am totally in for the long haul and you should be too.

Story: Joshua Corin Art: Todd Nauck Colorist: Jim Charalampidis
Story:9.1 Art:8.9 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #13

detailIn Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #13, Doreen Green, her mom, best friend Nancy, and an army of squirrels fight back against the living Gulliver’s Travel riff, Enigmo as he multiplies at an exponential rate and takes over both the United States and Canada. Writer Ryan North, artist Erica Henderson, and colorist Rico Renzi embrace the silliness of this premise and the seeming tranquility of the Ontario wilderness as Squirrel Girl with some assistance from the nihilistic robot Brain Drain and a very tired and pissed off Ant-Man of the Scott Lang variety use their minds, superpowers, and random pointless knowledge about various animals to defeat this crazy threat.

Add Scott Lang to the pantheon of popular characters that Erica Henderson has executed an epic riff on. She doesn’t draw him in Paul Rudd heartthrob mode, but in full anger mode with side of dad jokes about his “Ant Van” in his utility belt. He is constantly making fun of Canada, which kind of gets exasperating after a while, but luckily North balances his world-weariness with the high-level enthusiasm of Squirrel Girl and Nancy plus Brain Drain’s non-sequitur routine. (Basically, everything that comes out of this character’s mouth is super hilarious.) The plot of Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #13 is very much a middle chapter as Squirrel Girl and her team regroups to take out Enigmo. But this regroup includes a size changing van, canoes, and way too much information about ant colonies so the comic is still pretty entertaining.

Rico Renzi should be commended for his deep blue and black backgrounds for the Ontario scenes, which make it seem like Squirrel Girl and her company are really in the middle of nowhere and not in New York City lite or a Vancouver backlot. This kind of detail in locations is one of the strengths of the comics medium, and it pays off in a big way as the team dodges traffic on the expressway between Ontario and the United States, which turns into a fight scene against cops that all look like Enigmo. The fight choreography is super jumbled, but North and Henderson hit on a genius idea in the final pages that turns the arc from superhero versus multiplying supervillains fight to a heist movie complete with cool (imaginary) costumes. This totally makes sense because both Brain Drain and Scott Lang are former criminals. Plus Ant-Man’s movie was more of a heist flick with a third act that parodied Marvel superhero films so this turn in the plot is totally logical.

Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #13 tells the same joke about Canadians over and over and the fight against Enigmo is underwhelming, but for the most part Ryan North, Erica Henderson, and Rico Renzi turn in another wacky installment of Unbeatable Squirrel Girl complete with Doreen revealing that she treats the squirrels she controls as friends unlike Scott Lang and his ants, Maureen Green playing the overly proud parent, and the set up for next month’s heist issue. Plus there is the Marvel Comics debut of the talented Spider-Man fanzine artist Hannah Blumenreich on the reliably hilarious Deadpool trading cards that Brain Drain uses to pick a hero to help them against Enigmo

Story: Ryan North Art: Erica Henderson Colors: Rico Renzi
Story: 7.5 Art: 8 Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

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