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Tokyo Ghost Gets Adapted by Legendary with Cary Fukunaga Directing

From comic page to big screen, Tokyo Ghost is being adapted into a film with Cary Fukunaga directing. Fukunaga is the director behind the eagerly awaited James Bond entry, No Time to Die. Legendary Entertainment is the studio developing the film.

Based on the comic series by writer Rick Remender artist, Sean Gordon Murphy, letterer Rus Wooton, and colorist Matt Hollingsworth the comic series was published by Image Comics. Remender will pen the film project.

Tokyo Ghost is set in 2089 when humanity has become addicted to technology. It’s a way to escape reality. Two peacekeepers are given a job that takes them to the tech-free nation of Tokyo, the last tech-free country on Earth.

Tokyo Ghost was originally released in 2015 and lasted ten issues. The 10 issues were then released in two volumes as well as a deluxe edition featuring all ten issues.

Tokyo Ghost

Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #11

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

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Amazon
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This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ultramega #1

Ultramega #1

I love the kaiju genre. The concept of battling giant monsters has always appealed to me and while I’m not an expert, it’s a story I get sucked into a lot. And the stories tend to be pretty simple. There’s a giant monster and another monster/being/robot must battle them in a fight. The childhood action figure battles play out on screen, often with amazing visuals on a massive scale. But, there’s a lot of these stories now, so what makes them stand out is key. No longer do I look for just the battle, I want more. Ultramega #1 is the latest entry in the genre and while a lot of it is pretty standard, its over-the-top nature makes it stand out… a bit.

Created by James Harrem, who handles the writing and art, Ultramega #1 stands out in a lot of ways. The comic features a mysterious entity who imbues three individuals the power to detect and stop kaiju. In this version ordinary individuals impacted by a space virus randomly turn and grow into giant monsters. That in itself is not new or different. Where the comic ends up also doesn’t feel all that new or different. It’s the battle in between that’s memorable.

This is a comic that’s best to not spoil. Harrem has delivered a comic with twists in the battles. They’re so over the top with aspects I’ve never seen in this sort of comic. There’s a lot here that had me pause and say “I haven’t thought/seen that before”. And that’s a good thing. There’s a lot of original ideas here. But, all of those ideas are focused on laughable violence where blood literally floods the streets. It’s that comical level of violence where it’s hard to not laugh at how silly it is. And with that, some enjoyment.

Harrem delivers all of that with an almost glee. It feels like there’s scenes where there’s thought as to how much blood and goo to put on the various objects. It’s a level that’s comical at times with rivers of flood flood the streets and body parts flying about. There’s a glee in the destruction. Dave Stewart‘s colors and Rus Wooton‘s lettering only adds to the fun as the group go over the top with the gore.

Ultramega #1 is an entertaining start. It’s destruction is what stands out from the similar stories. It doesn’t just deliver fallen building and destroyed cars, it does it in a style and on a level that’s amusing and lighthearted. There’s a lot to this debut that’s familiar but it delivers it all in a style all its own.

Story: James Harrem Art: James Harrem
Color: Dave Stewart Letterer: Rus Wooton
Story: 7.75 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.95 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #10

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Amazon
Zeus Comics
TFAW

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #9

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Amazon
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #8

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Charlie Adlard
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Amazon
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Walking Dead Deluxe #6

The Walking Dead returns in full color with extras! The Walking Dead Deluxe takes us back to the beginning with each issue now featuring full color. There’s also extras of what might have been with notes as part of “The Cutting Room Floor.”

What’s it like to revisit this modern classic? How does it change all these years later… and in color? Find out!

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Tony Moore
Color: Dave McCaig
Letterer: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Amazon

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Solid Blood #17

Solid Blood #17 is a surprise drop comic from Image Comics and Skybound Entertainment. A “What if” type comic created by writer Robert Kirman with art by Ryan Ottley, the sci-fi/fantasy comic is what might have been released had The Walking Dead not been a success.

The results are… interesting.

Story: Robert Kirkman
Art: Ryan Ottley
Ink/Color: Cliff Rathburn
Lettere: Rus Wooton

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook.

Review: Dark Nights: Death Metal Multiverse’s End #1

DARK NIGHTS: DEATH METAL MULTIVERSE'S END #1

I’ve been a bit mixed about the Dark Nights: Death Metal event. The story so far hasn’t quite lived up to the “attitude” that was pitched. It’s not so much “death metal” as “geek/nerd metal”. My other issue is that the event feels like the latest “Crisis” but with a different title. There’s also a habit of key events taking place in one-shots instead of the main title. Dark Nights: Death Metal Multiverse’s End #1 is one of those “key” event stories which is frustrating but the issue has a lot going for it too. Those things? That’d be humor and heart.

Written by James Tynion IV, Dark Nights: Death Metal Multiverse’s End #1 focuses on the teams whose role is to destroy the various towers fueling Perpetua. Dubbed “Justice Incarnate,” heroes from across the multiverse have teamed up to save the day. John Stewart, Guy Garder, President Superman, and Captain Carrot, are just some of the characters featured in the comic and each role is interesting.

There’s a lot to like about the comic. For those who haven’t been reading the event, Stewart acts as narrator catching readers up with the details. He presents the current situation to Owlman who has captured Stewart and debating if he wants to help save the day. It’s the best description of the current event and how it ties into classics DC “Crisis” events. It’s also the nail in the coffin that this is indeed just the latest of those. What Stewart delivers is a clearer understanding of DC meta history. After reading the issue, I actually “got it” and could explain things better. It’s info that’d be so useful in other aspects of the comic event.

But, the comic is more than a primer to Dark Nights: Death Metal and the previous Crisis. Tynion delivers an action packed issue of the heroes attempting to shut down the towers to stop Perpetua from siphoning more energy. With different teams on different worlds, we get to see Justice Incarnate battle vampires, Nazis, and the Crime Syndicate. Each fight has its own moments. To see Guy Gardner and Captain Carrot punch Nazis delivers a bit of catharsis in these times.

And, Tynion delivers some heart too. While it feels a little bit out of place, there’s moments where character reflect on their friends lost and the hope they’re delivering. Much of that is through Captain Carrot who I suspect we’ll be seeing a lot more of after the dust settles from the latest event.

Tynion also has some fun with the silliness of the event. Perpetua sends more Evil Batman creations to stop the heroes introducing the Rainbow Batman Corps led by Evil Batman Baby. Yes, a baby Batman who’s cute as can be but also deadly like a small dog on the attack. Tynion recognizes the over the top nature of it all and just goofiness and decides to make that a part of the story as the evil Batman Corps is battled. There’s a layering to the story like that which provides a fascinating aspect.

The art from Juan Gedeon delivers a Simon Bisley Lobo vibe to the comic emphasizing the exaggerated nature of events and adding to the humor of it all. There’s a lighthearted aspect in that way as punches are over the top and the action full of color delivered by Mike Spicer. Nazis, vampires, and more never quite feels like an ominous scary threat. The situation is dire and downright depressing at times but there’s a cartoonish quality to the style that makes the comic fun. Punches lack “pow” and “blam” but the style has readers adding that as we bounce from fight scene to fight scene and planet to planet.

Dark Nights: Death Metal Multiverse’s End #1 is a chapter in the bigger picture event. It doesn’t quite stand on its own but there’s a certain insanity to it that almost makes it worth it. But, what’s truly impressive with the comic is a self-awareness that doesn’t seem present elsewhere. It makes fun of itself and the silliness we’ve seen throughout the event. It goes all out, then makes fun of itself for doing so. And that brings a certain enjoyment.

Story: James Tynion IV Art: Juan Gedeon
Color: Mike Spicer Letterer: Rus Wooton
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation:
Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Fire Power Gets a Double Sellout and New Printings

The New York Times bestselling, Eisner Award winning pop culture phenomenon Robert Kirkman has caught lightning in a bottle once more on his co-creation with Eisner winning artist Chris Samnee, Eisner Award-winning colorist Matt Wilson, and letterer Rus Wooton in the new series—Fire Power. Issues #1 and #3 are being rushed back to print in order to keep up with breakout customer demand.

Despite a total of 200K copies of Fire Power #1 already pumped into circulation, the launch issue has sold out at the distributor level, alongside Fire Power #3, with backorders piling up.

In the new series Fire Power, Owen Johnson’s journey to China to learn about his birth parents eventually leads him to a mysterious Shaolin Temple. The students there study The Fire Power—the lost art of throwing fireballs. A power they claim will be needed soon to save the world. Will Owen Johnson be the first person in a thousand years to wield the Fire Power?

Fire Power #1, second printing (Diamond Code AUG208118) and Fire Power #3, second printing (Diamond Code AUG208119) will both be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, October 14.

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