Tag Archives: renzo podesta

Review: Skip to the End

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got a graphic novel that mixes music and comics.

Skip to the End is by Jeremy Holt, Alex Diotto, Renzo Podesta, Adam Wollet, and Tim Daniel.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

 

Insight Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Rock out and Skip to the End this June from Jeremy Holt, Alex Diotto, and Insight Comics

Bassist-turned-junkie Jonny Wells is addicted to his past, but the only way to get there is through his music.

This June, Insight Comics is publishing Skip to the End, a riveting graphic novel created as an allegory to the history of the legendary band Nirvana.

Skip to the End tells Jonny’s story as he tries to cope with his band mate and best friend Kirk’s suicide. Twenty years later he struggles with heroin addiction, lost in the songs they created and desperate to relive the past—unitl one day he discover he can. With the aid of a mysterious guitar, Jonny begins to make trips back in time, searching for the roots of Kirk’s unraveling. At Nar-Anon meetings and in conversations with his sponsor Emily, he starts to cope with the events that led to Kirk’s death. But by the time Jonny realizes that his visits can’t change the present, he might be too addicted to stop.

Skip to the End explores music’s transportive property, while sharing a story of friendship, combating addiction, and suicide awareness.

Skip to the End is written by Jeremy Holt, with art by Alex Diotto, designed by Tim Daniel, colored by Renzo Podesta, and lettering by Adam Wollet.

Review: Howard Lovecraft and the Three Kingdoms

howard lovecraft and the three kingdoms coverThe advent of steampunk as a somewhat established genre has brought along a lot of friends from the past. Rooted most strongly in the works of Verne, the genre has also deviated a bit from Verne’s original works as it has evolved in the modern pop culture. Seemingly in the search for more steampunk material, fans of the genre have delved deeper into the past and found some other source material, namely steampunk horror. Although potentially typified by Poe or Shelley, the real resurgence in horror from this time has no doubt been H.P. Lovecraft. His horror stories are more popular today than probably at any other time (including when he was alive) and other mediums (including board games and video games) use his inspiration to create their own works.

The collected volume of Howard Lovecraft and the Three Kingdoms from Arcana Studios is not so different. It opens with a quote from Poe and quickly introduced us to a dying elder Lovecraft and his son. A part of Lovecraftian fiction was his own interaction with his work, in which he himself explored his own horrors through his pen and paper. In this case it would seem as though the elder were the one to really undertake the journey into this dark despair and to record the thoughts by way of the book. As a reading of this work this makes more sense, because although the younger Lovecraft is in fact the Lovecraft, it doesn’t exactly read like that.  The father’s weeping is more consistent with the author’s works, not the dynamic nature of the youngster.

lovecraftBefore I get too far ahead of myself though, I would like to talk about Santa Claus. It is not because Santa Claus plays a very important role in this book, but rather because he shouldn’t play one at all. The idea of Santa Claus providing gifts to children is an idea that is purely 20th century, and as this book is based in 1894, it is a bit of an anachronism when little Howard gets his first Lovecraftian torture novel from jolly old Saint Nick. Am I being too picky on the anachronism?  Not really, because it is the anachronism which actually makes this graphic novel work. For those more familiar with Lovecraft’s work, they will find among the author’s thoughts some subtle and not-so-subtle opinions on race and gender, neither of which would really fly in the modern world as opinions to be held outside of the far right of the spectrum. These opinions which exist in his work are also anachronisms, and if they are replaced by clearly misunderstood aspects of modern day Yuletide, then it is for the better. Out go the remnants of outdated thinking, in comes a tentacled creature named Spot (the name Spot for a pet being a bit of an anachronism as well.)

The end process of this selective process of finding the right balance between modern and past is something akin to a children’s book, which to be fair seems to be the point anyway. Dark and dangerous is replaced with cuddly and squishy, with the terrible Lovecraftian monsters being no scarier than the creatures in “Where the Wild Things Are.” The end result is basically a Lovecraftian tale aimed at children, and one which is successful in removing the scariest parts of the writer’s bag of tricks. Is it for adults? I would say equally yes, particularly those that do like a bit of dark Victorian to go with their daily lives. It is maybe not a groundbreaking work, but pays homage to the writer without taking itself too seriously and ends up being a fun read with matching artwork to complement the stories.

Story: Bruce Brown Art: Renzo Podesta and Thomas Boatwright
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read for Adult, Buy for Child

Arcana Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Art Monster #3

Art Monster #3

Writer: Jeremy Holt
Artist: Frances Ciregia
Colorist: Renzo Podesta
Letterer: Adam Wollet
Price: $0.99
Pages: 25
Rating: 15+

As Victor and Ivan struggle with their experimentations, an equally macabre series of events take place across the street at the town’s funeral home. Operated by the enigmatic owner known simply as Leland, the questionable undertaker’s expansive property houses more than it appears.

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Preview: Art Monster #2

Art Monster #2

Writer: Jeremy Holt
Art: Francesca Ciregia
Letterer: Renzo Podesta
Colorist: Adam Wollet
Price: $0.99
Pages: 20
Rating: 15+

Unsure of how to prevent his imminent expulsion, Victor’s thoughts are sidetracked when Erin introduces him to her twin sister Emma, who is visiting for spring break and unexpectedly takes an immediate liking to him. Too preoccupied to notice her interest, Victor enlists Ivan to assist with a revolutionary art piece inspired by a vision of death and reanimation.

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Preview: Art Monster #1

Art Monster #1

Writer: Jeremy Holt
Art: Francesca Ciregia
Colorist: Renzo Podesta
Letterer: Adam Wollet
Price: $.99
Pages: 16
Rating: 15+

Victor, a struggling artist in his seventh year of art school, is unable to complete the requirements for his degree. With expulsion looming, he is further sidetracked by meeting Erin, a beautiful and talented furniture designer. Around the same time, he also meets Ivan, a successful performance artist with a penchant for bizarre interactive exhibitions. Unbeknownst to Victor, these serendipitous interactions are the catalyst for what will become his artistic breakthrough.

Art_Monster_01-1

Viper Comics Announces Digital 1st Series!

Viper Comics Announces Digital 1st Series!

Viper Comics is proud to announce its Digital 1st comic series which is being launched today, “Ichabod Jones: Monster Hunter”.  Get your digital copy for only .99 cents at Graphicly, iVerse, and coming soon to Comixology, iBooks and Amazon. 

The series will start with the release of Issue #1 today, Issue #2 (April 18),

Issue #3 (May 16), and Issue #4 (June 13). 

Ichabod Jones Issue #3

Ichabod Jones: Monster Hunter

Written by Russell Nohelty | Art by Renzo Podesta

Ichabod Jones is a deranged, mentally unstable psychopath. He’s also on a mission to save the world. At least that’s what the bossy voice in his head tells him. The same voice that led him to be interred in a maximum security mental asylum in the first place. Now, he must escape from the asylum and rid the world of monsters in the midst of the Apocalypse. Of course he’s a  psychopath, so who knows if anything going on in his head is real in the first place.

Preview – 27: Second Set #4

27: Second Set #4

story CHARLES SOULE, art RENZO PODESTA, cover SCOTT FORBES

Price: $3.99

The second chapter of the 27 saga comes to a close with a stunning confrontation between Garland and one-hit-wonder-witch, Valerie Hayes. It’s a talent competition with the entire world as the audience, judged by none other than the God of Fame. The loser loses it all, and the winner takes… everything!

Preview – 27: Second Set #3

27: Second Set #3

story CHARLES SOULE, art RENZO PODESTA, cover SCOTT FORBES

Price: $3.99

1980s one-hit wonder turned witch Valerie Hayes will NOT stop until she has magically stolen our hero William Garland’s immense fame and made it her own. Her first attempt failed miserably, so now she’s calling on the other members of the one-hit wonder club to help. Full of homages to some of rock’s greatest fizzles, this is one issue not to miss!

Review – 27: Second Set #2 and #3 – Extra Early Review!

27: Second Set #2 CoverI’ve been a fan of Charles Soule‘s 27 when I first saw his pitch at the Baltimore Comic Con last year.  The art was amazing and the idea of a series following a down on his luck musician hoping to make it to his 28th birthday was something I was familiar with and intrigued in how it would be depicted.  Little did I know the story would be infused with mysticism, deals with the devil and a nice puzzle throughout.

Fast forward to the second set and the mysticism and focus on numbers has been dialed down a bit.  Instead we’re given a volume that’s focus is the character of Alex Garland and what it means to have a second chance.

At the end of the first issue, Garland has revealed the board in his chest to the world with a rather impressive light show.  He quickly rockets from being a musician who is working his way back to the top to instantly being the hottest thing there is out there.

Garland has revealed to the world that he has a bizarre button implanted in his chest that gives him genius-level creative powers every time it is pushed. His fame has skyrocketed, but he’s already attracting unwanted attention: a 1980s one-hit wonder turned witch will do whatever she can to steal the button, even if it means cutting it right out of Garland’s chest!

The idea of having this focus on one-hit wonders through the second volume is impressive and smart.  Garland could easily go that route.  He also could skyrocket to the spotlight by using the device in his chest.  But in the first issue, we see him putting in the hard work.

The second and third issue have a nice track running through them following Garland and the baddie.  There’s the story of the world reacting to Garland’s reveal and then there’s Valerie Hayes, the one-hit wonder who wants Garlands power.  He’s in the limelight again and she wants to be there.  Garland made a deal to get their and is literally killing himself each time he uses his power, how far will she go?

There’s just something that’s really fun with this second volume.  I feel like I’m on the fame ride with Garland and there’s such smart commentary on that experience throughout, but it’s very subtle and not preachy.  The nods of the hats to the one-hit wonders of the past is great as well.  It starts from the covers and works it’s way inward.

The art is unbelievable.  There’s little out there that looks like this series.  I’d hang these pages on my wall, the covers especially.  If the story doesn’t get you, the art will.  It’s beyond fantastic.

27 is a comic like no other.  Unique story, amazing art the second and third issues are an absolute buy.

Writer: Charles Soule Art: Renzo Podesta Cover: Scott Forbes Publisher: Image Comics

Story: 8.75 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review

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