Tag Archives: peter tomasi

Wonder Woman, Titans, Swamp Thing, and The Flash Get Giant at Walmart

DC announced today that it’s expanding its line of comics currently exclusive to Walmart. The publisher is increasing the slate of 100-Page Giant comics from four to six. In addition, two titles from the original lineup will be re-titled and renumbered as #1 issues. All titles, including the Superman 100-Page Giant featuring Tom King with Andy Kubert and the Batman 100-Page Giant featuring Brian Michael Bendis and Nick Derington, will arrive in participating U.S. Walmart retail stores by Sunday, February 17.

Additions to the lineup include the Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant #1 and The Flash 100-Page Giant #1. As with the other Walmart titles, each book will retail at $4.99 and combine new original stories with “flashback” content from popular DC story eras such as DC Rebirth, the New Age of Heroes and the New 52.

The debut issue of the Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant includes an original story, “Desert of Ash,” written by Tim Seeley, with art by Mike Perkins. This 12-page tale features Swamp Thing and his witch companion Briar as they face the pyromaniac Char Man, who possesses the ability to control flames, a power granted by the elemental spirits of fire itself. Issues #2 and #3 feature “Bog of Blood,” a two-parter by Seeley with art by Joëlle Jones, which introduces a terrifying and potentially supernatural slasher stalking the swamps of Louisiana.

This 100-page spectacular also includes fan-favorite stories from DC’s New 52 period, including Jeff Lemire, Travel Foreman, and Dan Green’s “The Hunt,” from Animal Man, in addition to “Raise Dem Bones,” from the New 52 Swamp Thing by writer Scott Snyder and Yanick Paquette, plus “Death in a Small Town,” featuring Detective Chimp and Shadowpact.

Swamp Thing 100-Page Giant

The Flash 100-Page Giant #1 features an all-new tale of the Scarlet Speedster, written by Gail Simone with art by Clayton Henry. In the 12-part arc “Glass Houses,” Barry Allen is dedicated to keeping the streets of Central City safe as the Fastest Man Alive. But when his old foe Mirror Master shows up looking to cause trouble, it’s up to the Flash to stop him. This book also debuts classic tales of the New 52 version of the Flash by Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, in addition to the spacefaring adventures of Adam Strange from 2004 by Andy Diggle and Pasqual Ferry, plus the classic New 52 “rebirth” of the World’s Mightiest Mortal, Shazam, from Geoff Johns and Gary Frank.

The Flash 100-Page Giant #1

Both the Justice League of America and Teen Titans Giants will retain their same contents but continue with new cover titles and will be renumbered with #1 issues. The Justice League of America 100-Page Giant becomes Wonder Woman 100-Page Giant #1, continuing the original Wonder Woman story by Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti ,Tom Derenick, and Chad Hardin, with “flashback” stories from Geoff Johns’ New 52 Justice League and Aquaman, plus 2006’s “Who Is Wonder Woman?” by Allan Heinberg, Rachel Dodson, and Terry Dodson.

Wonder Woman 100-Page Giant #1

The Teen Titans 100-Page Giant continues as Titans 100-Page Giant #1, with writer Dan Jurgens continuing his original story with art by Scot Eaton and Wayne Faucher. In addition, the book will continue the ongoing reprint stories from Geoff Johns and Tom Grummett’s Teen Titans from 2004, Peter Tomasi’s Super Sons from 2017’s DC Rebirth and Kenneth Rocafort, Dan DiDio, and Max Raynor’s Sideways from the New Age of Heroes.

Titans 100-Page Giant #1

Each 100-page comic sells for $4.99 and are available in more than 3,000 participating Walmart retailers in the United States.

Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram’s House of Penance Gets a Deluxe Library Edition

With their series House of Penance, Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram wove a macabre tale of guilt, ghosts, and guns, in a fictionalized account of Sarah Winchester’s descent into madness. Now, Dark Horse is releasing a deluxe library edition collecting all six issues of House of Penance in an oversized hardcover format with new cover art, sketchbook extras, and more.

House of Penance is a horrific tale of how fortune brings misfortune, as a grim and determined woman oversees the construction of a house twenty-four hours a day for twenty years mission to wash away the blood curse of her husband’s invention, the Winchester rifle, from claiming her own life and soul.

House of Penance Library Edition HC goes on sale March 27, 2019. This 176-page volume retails for $34.99.

Batman Creators Capullo, King, Parker, Rousseau, Snyder and Tomasi at Baltimore Comic Con 2018

The Baltimore Comic-Con returns to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor on September 28-30, 2018 at the Baltimore Convention Center. Tickets are now on sale. Baltimore Comic-Con is welcoming top creators of one of comics’ most iconic characters, DC Comics’ Batman, including Greg Capullo, Tom King, Jeff Parker, Craig Rousseau, Scott Snyder, and Peter Tomasi.

Greg Capullo is a self taught Illustrator, working for the past five years as artist on the New York Times best-selling, highly-acclaimed Batman series for DC Comics. He is presently co-creating the Image Comics’ book titled Reborn, along with writer Mark Millar. Prior to his Batman run, he was best known for his 80-issue run on Image Comics’ Spawn. Other popular comics work includes Marvel Comics’ X-Force and Quasar. He is also the creator of The Creech, a sci-fi/horror comic published by Image Comics. Greg has provided art for Blizzard Entertainment’s World of Warcraft, contributed lead character designs for the the award-winning HBO animated Spawn series, and was the cover artist for many popular musical groups, including Five Finger Death Punch, Korn, and Disturbed.

Ringo and Eisner Award-winning Tom King is currently the writer of Batman at DC Comics, where he has also written Mister MiracleGraysonThe Omega MenDC NationSwamp Thing Winter Special, and has a story in Action Comics #1000, not to mention his award-winning work at Marvel on The Vision. King’s first book, A Once Crowded Sky, a postmodern super hero novel, was recognized by USA Today as one of the best Graphic Novels of the year. He was named by the Hollywood Reporter as one of the five comic creators to watch in 2015.

Jeff Parker is best known for writing comic books, such as Agents of AtlasX-Men First ClassBatman ’66AquamanFuture QuestThunderbolts, and more. His career in comics started as an penciller at Malibu, where he provided art for Solitaire. For years, Parker made a living drawing stories, as well as commercial art and storyboards for TV. At the inaugural Mike Wieringo Comic Book Industry Awards, Parker’s work on Future Quest at DC Comics won the Mike Wieringo Spirit Award.

Craig Rousseau has spent his career as an artist working on numerous noteworthy titles and runs. He has spent time on DC Comics’ Batman BeyondHarley Quinn, and Impulse, Marvel’s Captain America & the Korvac SagaSpider-Man Loves Mary Jane Season 2, and Iron Man & the Iron Wars, and he can be seen lately working on DC Comics’ Batman ’66, Image Comics’ Perhapanauts: Danger Down Under, and Dynamite Entertainment’s Pathfinder: Goblins!

Scott Snyder made a huge impact on the comic industry with his ground-breaking work in DC’s New 52, writing Batman (with artist Greg Capullo) and Swamp Thing. In 2011, he received Harvey and Eisner Awards for Best New Series for his work on American Vampire. In addition to these three titles, Snyder co-wrote Talon, which spun off directly from his critically-acclaimed “Court of Owls” storyline from Batman. He is currently taking the reins of DC Comics’ Justice League, writes New Challengers, and has authored such titles as Detective ComicsThe WakeSuperman UnchainedAll-Star BatmanBatman EternalJustice League: No JusticeDC NationAction Comics #1000, and Dark Nights: Metal.

Peter Tomasi is a writer and editor best known for his work at DC Comics. He began his career in 1993, editing such titles as Green Lantern, the Batman titles, AquamanHawkman, and JSA before being promoted to Senior Editor in 2003. In 2007, Tomasi decided to move from editing to writing full-time and, in 2010, took over writing Batman and Robin with issue #20. Since the launch of the New 52, Tomasi has helmed the new volumes of both Batman and Robin and Green Lantern CorpsThe Adventures of the Super SonsAction Comics #1000Superman, and The Kamandi Challenge at DC Comics, as well as House of Penanceat Dark Horse Comics.

In addition to on-site CGC grading, this year’s confirmed guests for the show include: Arthur Adams (Guardians of the Galaxy), Joel Adams (Bucky O’Hare Graphic Novel Coloring Book), Neal Adams (Deadman), Zeea Adams (Neal Adams Monsters), Arantza (fantasy artist), Brian Azzarello (100 Bullets), Jeremy Bastian (Cursed Pirate Girl), Marty Baumann (Big Hero 6), June Brigman (Power Pack), Pat Broderick (Micronauts), Mark Buckingham (Scooby Apocalypse), Buzz (Superman: The Coming of the Supermen), Greg Capullo (Dark Knights: Metal), Christa Cassano (Ghetto Klown), Howard Chaykin (Captain America), Joyce Chin (All-New Wolverine), Frank Cho (Harley Quinn), Amy Chu (Red Sonja), Steve Conley (The Middle Age), Katie Cook (Thanos Annual), Paris Cullins (WWE Superstars), Kristina Deak-Linsner (Vampirella: Roses for the Dead), Jose Delbo (Spongebob Comics), Vito Delsante (Midnight Tiger Stronger), Todd Dezago (Tellos), Garth Ennis (Jimmy’s Bastards, Friday and Saturday only), David Finch (Trinity), Meredith Finch (Rose), Jenny Frison (Wonder Woman), Steve Geiger (Web of Spider-Man), Joe Giella (The Flash), Tom Grummett (The New Titans, courtesy of Hero Initiatiive), Bob Hall (Squadron Supreme), Dean Haspiel (The Red Hook), Clinton Hobart (Disney fine artist), Jamal Igle (Molly Danger), Tony Isabella (Black Lightning), Todd Johnson (Tribe), Justin Jordan (Hal Jordan and the Green Lantern Corps), Tom King (Batman), Barry Kitson (The Flash), Alisa Kwitney (Mystik U), Leo Leibelman (Heavy Metal), Paul Levitz (Brooklyn Blood), Joseph Michael Linsner (Vampirella: Roses for the Dead), Kevin Maguire (Man of Steel), Shawn Martinbrough (Shadowman), Ron Marz (Fathom Vol. 7), Ed McGuinness (Avengers), Bob McLeod (G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero), Dawn McTeigue (Divinica), Adriana Melo (Plastic Man, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Frank Miller (Xerxes: The Fall of the House of Darius and the Rise of AlexanderSaturdayand Sunday only), Stuart Moore (Deadpool the Duck), Terry Moore (Strangers in Paradise), Michael Moreci (Nightwing), Denny O’Neil (DC Universe Holiday Special, courtesy of Hero Initiative), John Ostrander (Suicide Squad, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Tom Palmer (Avengers), Dan Parent (Betty & Veronica Friends Forever), Jeff Parker (Future Quest Presents), Paul Pelletier (Titans Special), David Petersen (Mouse Guard), Brandon Peterson (Green Lanterns), Tom Peyer (Captain Kid), Richard and Wendy Pini (Elfquest), Andy Price (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), David Proch (Quarter Moon), Tom Raney (Giantkillers), Frank Reynoso (Garbage Pail Kids: Fables, Fantasies and Farts), Afua Richardson (Black Panther: World of Wakanda), Roy Richardson (The Flash), Don Rosa (Uncle Scrooge), Craig Rousseau (Startup), Andy Runton (Owly), P. Craig Russell (Salome and Other Stories), Stuart Sayger (GI Joe: A Real American Hero vs. The Six-Million Dollar Man), Louise Simonson (Action Comics #1000), Walter Simonson (Thor), Dan Slott (Tony Stark: Iron Man), John K. Snyder (Fashion in Action), Scott Snyder (Justice LeagueSaturday only), Jim Starlin (Thanos: The Infinity SiblingsSaturday and Sunday only), Joe Staton (Dick Tracy), Brian Stelfreeze (Black Panther), Jim Steranko (Action Comics), Larry Stroman (Tribe), Rob Stull (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Peter Tomasi (Superman), David Trustman (God Slap), Sarah Trustman (The Memory Arts), Gus Vazquez (Sunfire and Big Hero Six), Rick Veitch (Rick Veitch’s The One), Magdalene Visaggio (Eternity Girl), Mark Waid (Captain America), Larry Watts (Evil Dead 2: Cradle of the Damned); Bob Wiacek (All New Wolverine), Rich Woodall (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), and Thom Zahler (Time & Vine).

Review: Action Comics #1000 Captures Superman’s Inspirational Power

In Action Comics #1000, an all-star team of writers, artists, and colorists try and for the most part succeed at getting to the heart of Superman. Some stories touch on different eras of history from his time in the 1930s as a non-flying, slumlord buster and the Mort Weisinger Silver Age sci-fi kookiness to classic comics like Kingdom Come. Others look at his relationships with his parents, wife/co-worker Lois Lane, and his arch-nemesis Lex Luthor. One story even looks far in the future of the DC Universe while another acts as a semi-controversial prologue to Brian Michael Bendis’ upcoming Man of Steel miniseries and his runs on Action Comics and Superman.

To give each story the attention it needs, I will do a short review of each one and score it at the end of the paragraph. A final aggregated score  will conclude this (hopefully not that long) “80 page giant” review.

Action Comics #1000 opens with one hell of a curtain call from writer/penciler Dan Jurgens, inker Norm Rapmund, and colorist Hi-Fi that acts as a victory lap for Jurgens’ DC Rebirth run on Action Comics and his tireless work turning Superman from the edgy, armor wearing New 52 version to his classic role as a heroic hope bringer and a family man too. The story is simple. Metropolis is holding a Superman celebration day, but Superman doesn’t want their praise and adulation and wants to keep saving the day. However, through a little trickery from Lois and the Justice League, he ends up getting his moment in the sun. Jurgens’ writing cuts to the core of Superman and his positivity with a small-time Metropolis criminal named Benning talking about how he got him a job after prison so he wouldn’t keep relapsing and running with different supervillains. His art is a little old school, but that’s not a bad thing, and Rapmund’s inking helps make the crowd shots sharp in a story that shows Superman’s bond with the citizens of Metropolis and the superhero community while not neglecting the family elements that have been a big part of the Rebirth era of Superman. There really wouldn’t be a superhero genre without him.

Story: 9.5 Art: 8 Overall: 8.8

The next story “Neverending Battle” from the Superman creative team of Peter Tomasi, Patrick Gleason, and Alejandro Sanchez is a tiny bit philosophical, somewhat historical, and definitely epic as a story only done in full page spreads. It’s about Vandal Savage weaponizing Hypertime to trap Superman in his own history so he can’t get back to Jon and Lois to celebrate his birthday. Tomasi’s writing is a little corny at times with adages like “What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” and “History repeats itself”, but Gleason and Sanchez’s glorious visuals and the through-line of Superman consistently overcoming great odds wins out just like Superman over Vandal Savage. The first spreads are the most iconic with Golden Age Era Superman punching out gangsters, stopping locomotives, and throwing tanks around with Tomasi commentating on the simplistic, good vs. evil nature of these early stories. But he and Gleason aren’t afraid to get vulnerable with a poignant homage to the scene in The Dark Knight Returns where Superman is weakened after stopping a nuclear explosion that blocks out the sun or a page where he’s trapped in the Phantom Zone. However, despite cunning and powerful enemies and occasionally death itself, nothing will stop Superman from being a hero or spending time with his loved ones on his birthday. Gleason has a strong handle on the moral clarity and goodness behind Superman’s strength and I look forward to his upcoming work as the main Action Comics artist.

Story: 8.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.3

The third story “An Enemy Within” with a script from Marv Wolfman, Butch Guice and Kurt Schaffenberger inking over recently discovered Curt Swan, and colors by Hi-Fi straddles a thin line between optimism and naivete and definitely falls on the naive side. Superman is too busy fighting Brainiac in Japan so he relies on Maggie Sawyer and the Metropolis PD to take out a mind controlled teacher, who is holding his students hostage. There is an opportunity to address social issues, like school shooting, gun control, police violence, and even homelessness in a scene towards the end, but Wolfman, Swan, and Guice gloss over these issues with a simplistic “humanity is good and will save themselves” mantra and use the mind control plot device to cover their asses. Honestly, your enjoyment of this story will depend on how much you believe in the idea of original sin or your tolerance level for after school specials. Guice’s inks bring an interesting grit to Swan’s usually clean, bright pencils, and honestly, the best part of the story is a solemn Superman pinup at the end inked by the late Schaffenberger.

Story: 4.5 Art: 6.5 Overall: 5.5

Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, Olivier Coipel, and Alejandro Sanchez turn in a stoic, 1930s era Superman story about a small time crook named Butch who gets his car beat up when trying to fight Superman. It’s probably the car from the cover of Action Comics #1. Johns and Donner’s take on Superman is a little rougher and little more stern, but he has a solid moral compass and cares for humanity as shown by his empathy towards Butch, who lost his dad in combat during World War I. Coipel’s art is wonderfully rough hewn and is like Norman Rockwell’s work without the sentimentality, and he even plays the “It’s a bird, it’s a plane…” line for sardonic, silent comedy. His Superman commands the page and is someone who you would listen to and definitely take seriously. He doesn’t smile either. But the ending of “The Car” has an earned happiness and is a little spark of light in a cynical world. Johns and Donner really get that heroism is about the little things and not flying the world backwards or time travel shenanigans.

Story: 9.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.8

Scott Snyder, Rafael Albuquerque, and Dave McCaig tell a quiet, yet time spanning story about the relationship between Superman and Lex Luthor, and how Superman chooses to see the good even in his worst enemy. The story starts intense with shadow wreathed art and dark colors from Albuquerque and McCaig as Luthor has assembled some powerful MacGuffins to take out Superman. But he’s actually just star gazing at the Smallville Planetarium? Albuquerque’s art is sharper and sadder after that with a nostalgic orange palette from McCaig as Lex tells Superman that the planetarium was an escape from bad weather and his abusive parents. They seamlessly blend past and present as it’s revealed that a young Clark Kent gave Lex’s space laser a little boost and saved his life. Snyder uses this anecdote/flashback sequence to hold out hope for a time when “maybe” the cycle of hero and villain will be broken between Superman and Lex Luthor as the story fades to black.

Story: 9.6 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.7

Tom King makes a case for winning back to back Eisners for Best Short Story in his, Clay Mann, and Jordie Bellaire’s contribution to Action #1000, “Of Tomorrow”. It’s a tone poem about Superman’s last day on Earth as he says goodbye to Ma and Pa Kent one last time as the Earth is engulfed in the sun with flames and winds that are reminiscent of the last days of Krypton. King writes Superman as an old man wrestling with his past and legacy, wishing he could save more people, and being supremely proud of his wife and son. And it gets deep at the end when he reflects on his father’s blend of science and faith. Mann captures each tiny, beautiful moment in his artwork as he makes art with his strength, tears, and freeze breath: a frozen statuette of Jonathan and Martha Kent like the one of Jor-El and Lara-El in the Fortress of Solitude. Bellaire goes for Earth tones in her colors as Superman immerses himself in his adopted planet before flying off forever. He loves his parents, he loves Earth, but he realizes that all planets die and all story ends. (Except for his comic book for now.)

Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10

Two veteran comics creators Louise Simonson and Jerry Ordway show they still have a lot in the tank in their “Five Minutes” story with colorist Dave McCaig that expertly intertwines Superman’s life as a superhero and Clark Kent’s life as a journalist in five minutes. Simonson’s narration shows that both Clark and Superman’s “powers” come in handy in different situation as Superman is able to dart from a train accident to a hold up and finally to save the city from an asteroid just like Clark is able to write a story and get it in under deadline. It’s a quick, zippy read with a lot of heart and a kind of cheesy “twist” ending, but Simonson and Ordway show how much passion Superman/Clark Kent has for both saving people and reporting. He is precise, efficient, and knows when to fly to next crisis just like a writer juggling different projects. Plus there’s a Bibbo Bibbowski cameo, which will be a treat for Superman fans of the 80s and 90s.

Story: 8.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.3

Paul Dini, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez, Kevin Nowlan, and Trish Mulvihill turn in a cheeky homage to Superman’s history, Garcia-Lopez’s ability to skillfully render almost every DC Comics hero and villain, and most of all, Mr. Mxyzptlk. Mxyzptlk has the ability to wipe out Superman from the existence in the blink of an eye, but he’s more of a prankster than a coldblooded villain and enjoys toying with him instead. Dini, Garcia-Lopez, and Nowlan also provide a little meta-commentary on how stories involving superheroes in comics never seem to end even after they’re killed off or have passed their mantle to sidekicks or legacy heroes. Probably, because they’re too much fun. This story’s kryptonite is Dini indulging his sleazy side towards the end, but the energy and humanity of Garcia-Lopez’s figures and Mulvihill’s heroic colors more than make up for it.

Story: 7.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.0

In a much darker story than the previous one, “Faster than a Speeding Bullet” happens in a very short span of time as Superman tries to stop a domestic abuser from shooting his girlfriend, Lila, in the head. Artist John Cassaday tells the story in a series of freeze frames as you can see the strain of Superman flying to stop the bullet, and the red, yellow, and blue of Laura Martin’s colors as his chances increase. Brad Meltzer starts incredibly dark in his script with Superman running calculations in his head that he won’t be able to save Lila and ends with Superman admitting that he is inspired by humanity as much as they are inspired by him. “Faster than a Speeding Bullet” is a taut, mini-thriller that also captures Superman’s essence and the strength of his and the people he inspire’s resolves.

Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5

The final story in Action Comics #1000 is Brian Michael Bendis’ DC debut with Jim Lee, Scott Williams, and Alex Sinclair doing the art. Lee and Williams definitely put the “action” in Action Comics, and most of the story is a third act of Man of Steel fight sequence with collateral damage galore as new giant sword wielding alien conqueror villain Rogol Zaar crashes all over Metropolis and tries to kill the last two Kryptonians on Earth. Yes, Supergirl has a cameo in this comic and is there to get her ass kicked as much as Superman. Bendis’ writing is quippy as ever and doesn’t really pair well with the disaster movie feel of Lee and Williams’ art. He seems to be going for an “Avengers Disassembled” type of throughline in his approach to Superman by physically breaking him down and also taking shots at his past. Yes, the final page of Action Comics #1000 is a huge retcon for Superman’s character, and hopefully, Bendis has the reasoning and great story to back it up, or Rogol Zaar might just be a Mongul knock-off with a cooler sword.

Story: 6.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.0

 

Story: Dan Jurgens, Peter Tomasi, Marv Wolfman, Geoff Johns, Richard Donner, Scott Snyder, Tom King, Louise Simonson, Paul Dini, Brad Meltzer, Brian Michael Bendis  Art: Dan Jurgens with Norm Rapmund, Patrick Gleason, Curt Swan with Butch Guice and Kurt Schaffenberger, Olivier Coipel, Rafael Albuquerque, Clay Mann, Jerry Ordway, Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez with Kevin Nowlan, John Cassaday, Jim Lee with Scott Williams  Colors:  Hi-Fi, Alejandro Sanchez, Dave McCaig, Jordie Bellaire, Trish Mulvihill, Laura Martin, Alex Sinclair
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Superman #24

MINOR SPOILERS BELOW

I will admit, when I was first reading Superman #24, I was confused for a moment, due to the last issue of Action Comics. In that issue we see Clark, Lois, and Jon back in Metropolis, and here they are still in Hamilton County, wrapping things up with aliens, giant beasts, and more weirdness. That being said, chapter five of the Black Dawn story-line offered some fun and interesting twists.

We finally get to see who is behind all of the weird cult-like townspeople, visits from aliens, and other weird mysteries in Hamilton County that has plagued this series from the start, and it’s none other than Manchester Black. Due to his core beliefs, Black has a problem with Superman letting bad guys live. This is similar to other anti-heroes, like The Punisher, and so on, but Black is a little more evil here. Black reveals his true motives, and they involve Clark’s son, Jon aka Superboy. By the end of the book things get pretty crazy with his plans, and it will be interesting to see how the next issue, and this story plays out. Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason have done a good job with this series, and I have confidence that this will at least be another fun adventure when all is said and done.

Doug Mahnke and Patrick Gleason are both excellent artists. Neither of these talents are strangers to this book, and Gleason even co-writes with Tomasi. My only problem is with the switching on pencils about halfway through. Again, both artists are fantastic, but it was jarring and very noticeable to me as you can clearly see the switch. I am not sure if this was based on time, and scheduling, and it isn’t terrible or hurts the comic in a bad way, it was just very noticeable. The colors by Wil Quintana, John Kalisz, and Hi-Fi are bright and vivid, covering all types of aliens and ships, while the inks by Jaime Mendoza, Mick Gray, Joe Prado, and Doug Mahnke are crisp and well done, even with the different pencil styles.

The issue is a fun and wild ride featuring the cast of characters we know from this series. The Kent family is awesome, and I have had a blast going on these adventures with them. My only hope is that since they’ve been put through so much as a family, especially poor Jon, is that they find some more time to relax soon. Also Krypto makes another appearance, which is always awesome.

Story: Peter Tomasi & Patrick Gleason Art: Doug Mahnke & Patrick Gleason
Inks: Jaime Mendoza, Mick Gray, Joe Prado, and Doug Mahnke
Colors: Wil Quintana, John Kalisz, and Hi-Fi Letters: Rob Leigh

Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #6

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Evil has infiltrated Sarah’s sanctuary. Even Warren Peck, her newfound protector, and confidant is overwhelmed by the spirits that seek revenge upon her. In the terrifying conclusion of Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram’s horror miniseries, Sarah is forced to confront her demons, face to face.

House of Penance #6 is a little short on dialogue by writer Tomasi but it’s filled with action as the series concludes. Sarah seems extremely jubilant as her house falls apart around it and falling apart feels like an understatement somehow though. The twist ending I think will actually surprise you.

The art by Bertram continues to shine in a terrifying and grotesque manner. I will admit the way the house falls apart reminds me of a jigsaw puzzle if it was made by M.C Escher. There’s something haunting about its image.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #5

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Warren Peck is surprised to discover how far he is willing to go to protect the tormented widow. Their connection deepens as Peck contemplates his bloody past and Sarah grows more determined than ever to atone for her family’s sins.

With only one more issue left of House of Penance, the end begins to crack through, both literally and figuratively, as madness seems to infect the mansion. This causes fights, racial tension, and violence as an unexpected guest arrives to attempt to stop it all. Peck is given the reason Ms. Winchester decided to build the mansion and reveals how he became who is he. There’s a lot revealed here by writer Peter Tomasi.

The art style by Ian Bertram gets a little explosive as a sea of red begins to worm its way into place. I will admit the odd dream scene widow Winchester has stands out in this issue. It shows her descent into madness as she attempts to get her family back. While I wish I could share it, the one large vertical panel in this issue is one that should get attention. The attention to detail in that panel is well done, showcasing the sheer size of the house.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #4

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The chaotic construction is no longer enough to keep Sarah’s ghosts at bay, so she tries something more extreme to ease her conscience. Peck’s nightmares are growing worse, too. Brought together by their dark visions, the heiress and the outlaw are getting closer, but Sarah’s sister doesn’t like it one bit.

IT’S NOT JUST THE HOUSE THAT’S HAUNTED . . .

In House of Penance #4 the past returns to haunt the house, as more Sarah’s ghosts haunt her. Both physically and emotionally things get strange, with only two issues left. I will admit I’m curious to see if more of Sarah’s family visits to see if they try to stop her descent to into madness.

Sarah’s descent into madness manages to influence the art, as it gets darker, and a little gruesome at times. While it may not all be dark, there are a few bleak spots of light. They are spread out throughout the comic which manages to give the issue a sense of balance.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #3

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A visitor from Winchester’s past stirs up old demons, and she must find new ways to keep them out of her unearthly mansion. Meanwhile, Warren Peck comes face to face with specters from his own past and learns that he has more in common with her than he’d thought . . .

Edgar Allen Poe would be proud of this mix of horror and the occult written by Peter Tomasi. While the occult maybe a little subtle at times, there is a clear point of it. The incredibly graphic pseudo-flashback also give the readers a peek at Mr Peck’s violent past.

The flashback of Mr Peck is a gorgeous blend of art and story by artist Ian Bertram. I will admit the subtle use of interwoven black lines around every panel leaves one wondering what they are. Are they hair from Mrs Winchester, or are they something much more sinister?

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #2

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Sarah Winchester’s house is always under construction—the banging of hammers keeps her demons at bay. Her construction crew of vagrants and murderers build, tear down, and rebuild the mansion according to her visions. But her newest employee, Warren Peck, has brought some demons of his own . . .

A historical tale of horror from creator Peter Tomasi!

House of Penance is strange, addicting, and enthralling. This second issue continues the strange vein of creepy places, strange blood red worms, and odd flashbacks courtesy of Warren Peck. Even the sea of worms seems to grow as it comes and goes. Which makes me curious as to why it is growing, along the creepy forger person who makes a brief appearance.

I will admit the more the artist zooms up on Sarah Winchester’s eyes, it makes me wonder why. There is something creepy about that vacant blue eyed stare. The last few pages artwork is stunning and creepy.  I won’t spoil what happens in those pages, but be warned it is graphic.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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