Tag Archives: mina elwell

Starburns Presents Previews Key Titles for 2019

On Free Comic Book Day 2019, SBI Press delivers their next installment of Starburns Presents. This year’s edition will include special previews of Invasion From Planet Wrestletopia, Nasquatch, Hellicious Presents: Pick Your Perdition, Gryffen, B-Squad, and A Whole New Set of Problems by 30 Rock‘s Josh Fadem!

Invasion From Planet Wrestletopia

Written by Ed Kuehnel & Matt Entin
Art by Dan Schkade
Colors by Marissa Louise

SBI Press will publish the no-holds-barred, action-comedy sci-fi series from writers Matt Entin and Ed Kuehnel (Valiant HeartsMario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle, Lumberjack Man), artist Dan Schkade (Will Eisner’s The SpiritBattlestar Galactica: Gods & Monsters), colorist Marissa Louise (Spell on WheelsMystery Girl) and letterer Dave Lanphear (Shirtless Bear-Fighter, Quantum & Woody).

Inspired by the colorful days of 1980s pro-wrestling, the six-issue mini-series kicks off when disgruntled professional wrestler “Rock ‘n Roll” Rory Landell declares himself “galactic champion of the universe”, which a hostile planet of wrestling aliens takes as a declaration of war from Planet Earth.

Invasion From Planet Wrestletopia

Nasquatch

Written by CW Cooke and Kelly Williams
Art by Kelly Williams

Nasquatch is the story of Nas and Denny, two disparate souls brought together by racing, cars, and a love of the outdoors. Also, Nas is a sasquatch who is an unbelievable driver and Denny lives in a trailer park and just wants a better life.

Nasquatch will be a digital-first comic book series launching in 2019, first appearing in the pages of the Starburns Presents Free Comic Book Day issue from SBI Press and going from there digitally and eventually seeing print in trade paperback format.

Nasquatch

B-Squad

Written by Eben Burgoon
Art by Michael Calero

Following the missions of a squad of misfit mercenaries that range from pop-culture riffs to cut from whole cloth oddity — the expendable mercs just never seem to catch a break and face the Thanksgiving leftovers of upper-tier mercenary groups. The debut effort revisits Burgoon’s story made with artist Lauren Monardo which was originally released in early 2013. “Conspiracy in Cambodia” sees B-Squad head to Cambodia as they are tasked with protecting free-range cadre of “mugwai” from a group of radicalized hipsters poaching the furry critters for unknown gain.

Each “mission” of B-Squad will be released in a giant-size format and feature a Saturday Morning Cereal style collection of “tangent comics” including Burgoon’s newest series “Tiny Wizards” and Michael Calero’s “Monster Safari” as well as expansive activities, games, and magazine content that will remind people of dentist-office staples like Highlights magazine and ZooBooks.

B-Squad

Hellicious Presents: Pick Your Perdition

Written by A.C. Medina and Mina Elwell
Art by Kit Wallis and Trevor Richardson

Continuing Hellicious with its first spin off book, Pick Your Perdition #1: Seeking Briggy, will be an interactive comic set in the world of Hellicious. Following the untimely demise of goth rocker, Briggy Bundy, his surviving band has been left with a great big iconic lead singer-sized hole in their lives which they desperately need to fill. You, the reader, will become  the new frontman of Briggy Bundy’s band, but the fans aren’t interested in change and will only accept the original Briggy. To succeed, you will need the help of Briggy himself and all the supernatural powers to intercede on your behalf.

Hellicious Presents: Pick Your Perdition

FCBD 2019’s edition of “Starburns Presents” will also feature an excerpt of the upcoming digital first series, Gryffen, written by Ben Kahn and illustrated by Bruno Hidalgo, of Heavenly Blues fame and Josh Fadem of 30 Rock will present a sneak peek of his book A Whole New Set of Problems. Fadem’s book will be a collection of humor shorts in the style of Shel Silverstein, but more in line with the offbeat humor of Starburns Industries Press. In Gryffen, humanity has taken to the stars, and crushed it in an iron fist. The most powerful and tyrannical faction of humans call themselves the Sovereign Reach. But one captain has had enough, and they’re willing to burn down the universe to destroy their own kind. Cpt. Lyla Gryffen, driven insane and branded a traitor, recruits a crew of mad scientists and rogue officers to steal a ship and achieve their singular philosophy: introduce rapid, unchecked technological progress with the explicit aim of destabilizing the entire galactic society. Chasing Gryffen is Admiral Rosalind Hunter, a ruthless soldier who will protect the Reach’s stability at any cost. It’s a race to the edge of the universe as these iron wills clash. 

Review: Hellicious #2

Well that was an awkward meeting but hey, Cherry scared Briggy Bundy! Actually she may have killed him.  There’s no need to be mean about it, she just wanted to say hi! And to be the first to welcome Briggy to his new home, Hell! Just don’t tell Sin he’s here. Also where do these skeletons keep popping up from and why won’t they leave Cherry and Briggy alone? Go away you creeps, don’t you see Cherry and Briggy have tundras to explore and Hellbeasts to ride!

Our tour of Hell continues as Cherry brings Briggy Bundy to her home to show him around the place. Writers Alan C. Medina and Mina Elwell continue their twisted journey into the afterlife as Cherry brings on the psychotic side of her. Hellicious #2 delivers the reaping with a cuteness about it that delivers a humorous take on Hell.

The issue is Cherry taking Briggy around Hell convinced he’d enjoy it and her learning the truth about this rocker. There’s just a lot of weird cuteness as Medina and Elwell show us more of Hell and the comic’s success relies mainly on the crazy stops we’re introduced to.

The issue relies heavily on the art of Kit Wallis and colorist Jio Butler who have a style that reminds me a lot of the comics coming out in the 90s, the cute goth/demon comics of the time. The locations have details that dare you to look and with each look there’s lots to laugh and smile about. And there’s Cherry herself who takes you on it all with a cheerful glee and confusion when she eventual learns the truth about Briggy. There’s a childlike aspect that Wallis and Butler help emphasize through the art. Micah Meyers‘ lettering too helps with emphasizing the words in a way that helps enhance Cherry’s voice of a pretty spoiled child that’s also a reaper..

There’s a lot that this series reminds me of and there’s a retro vibe to it all that takes me back to some of the comics I collected as a kid in the 90s. I have no idea where this is all going but there’s something about it all that makes me want to find out.

Story: Alan C. Mediana and Mina Elwell Art: Kit Wallis
Color: Jio Butler Letterer: Micah Meyers
Story: 7.95 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Starburn Industries Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Starburn Industries Launches SBI Press on Free Comic Book Day and Announces New Staff

Starburns Industries, the production studio that brought you Rick and Morty, Anomalisa, and Harmonquest, is expanding beyond film and television development with Starburns Industries Press (SBI Press), a publisher of books, comics and specialty cassette tapes.

SBI Press’ talent includes Dan Harmon (Community, Rick and Morty), Dino Stamatopoulos (Moral Orel, Community, Mr. Show), and the vast network of comedians, writers, and podcasters affiliated with Starburns Audio.

The new imprint has signed a distribution agreement with Diamond Comic Distributors the world’s largest distributor of English-language comic books, graphic novels, and pop culture products, and its book trade division, Diamond Book Distributors.

The new division is founded and headed by Starburns production executive Simon Oré, who will serve as President of SBI Press. Joining Oré to build the division are new hires Brendan Wright, formerly of Dark Horse Comics and New Arab Media, who comes on board as SBI Press VP and Executive Editor, and Trevor Richardson, formerly of Diamond Comics Distributors, who fills the role of SBI Press VP of Acquisitions. The staff is rounded out by Editorial & Production Assistants Ross Clark and Paige Dowling, and PR and Marketing Manager Cassandra Church, with Starburns Producer Casey Rup (VICELAND’s Party Legends, Ricking Morty) serving as producer and consulting editor.

SBI Press becomes the first publisher to debut through the comics industry’s annual Free Comic Book Day event with the showcase Starburns Presents on the first Saturday of May. The anthology title will preview the SBI Press’s 2018 slate, headlined by a short story from comedian and writer Patton Oswalt, artist Troy Nixey, and colorist Michelle Madsen.

Coinciding with Free Comic Book Day, the May edition of Diamond’s Previews catalog will include the company’s first launches: Dan Harmon’s biting take on supervillainy, Gregory Graves, cowritten with Eric M. Esquivel, and illustrated by Brent Schoonover, Ted Naifeh, and Rebecca Nalty; Dino Stamatopolous and Leah Triscione’s graphic novel Trent, “a lighthearted tragedy with music”; and the company’s first series, Hellicious, a family comedy set in Hell, written by Alan C. Medina and Mina Elwell and illustrated by Kit Wallis and Jio Butler.

From there, the first wave of titles in 2018 continues with Comics Comics, teaming fan-favorite stand-up comedians with leading comic industry talent in an anthology series, Oddwell: The Frog of War, a fantasy-adventure comic series from writers David A. Clarke and Walter A. Bryant III and artist Acacia T. Rodarte; and The Crawling King, an illustrated dark fantasy novel by award-winning filmmaker and animator Einar Baldvin.

Hellicious By A.C. Medina, Mina Elwell, and Starburns Industries Press

Written by A.C. Medina and Mina Elwell, with art by Kit Wallis, Hellicious is a family comedy set in Hell.

Cherry, the Devil’s prankster granddaughter and the cutest grim reaper in Hell, is honestly just trying to have fun and make new friends. She just keeps getting derailed by the fact that human beings are flammable.

Don’t Torture Yourself — That’s Her Job…

She loves everything about Hell – its burning landscapes, its horrific inhabitants, and especially her demonic mother and grandfather – but she’s lonely. There’s nobody to play with, and anyone who tries ends up being defenestrated or digested or otherwise destroyed.

There’s only one mortal who Cherry thinks might be a good playmate: rock star and goth icon Briggy Bundy. The bad news is, he isn’t dead…Yet.

Being published by Starburns Industries Press, you’ll be able to get your first look during this year’s Free Comic Book Day before it goes on sale July 2018.

Borinquen: An Anthology for Puerto Rico Kickstarting Now

In mid-September 2017, the island of Puerto Rico was ravaged by Hurricanes Irma and Maria. A new Kickstarter hopes to raise money for a comic anthology that will raise money to help benefit the victims of the devastation.

Borinquen: An Anthology for Puerto Rico is an anthology about Puerto Rico, its people, its history, and the perseverance shown in the face of such destruction. The goal of this anthology is to raise funds to help the people of Puerto Rico. Net proceeds will be donated to United for Puerto Rico.

Borinquen features 12 short stories by some of the best creators in the business, as well as names you’ve not heard of…yet. Our proud team includes:

  • Roel Torres (Deathface Rocket Crew; Lightning Girl Loves Rocket Boy)
  • Helen Greetham (Jabbage Comics)
  • Jack Holder (Arcane Industries)
  • Beth Barnett (Brewed Awakening)
  • Micah Myers (Rat Queens Special; Bastard’s Waltz; Kill All Monsters)
  • Jonny Bloozit (The Nowhere Man)
  • Rafael Nieves (Bloodlines; Hellstorm; Bob Howard: Plumber of the Unknown)
  • Tony Maldonado (Bandthology; P.I. Jane)
  • Dino Caruso (Blue Hour; Dark Lies, Darker Truths)
  • Shawn Richison (Fisk: The Substitute)
  • Joe Covas (Ko the Bold)
  • Lawrence Plofker (lplofker.wordpress.com)
  • Zack Rupp (Detropia)
  • Emmanuel Reyes
  • Nadia Mujalli
  • Paul Axel (Rotten Roots)
  • Robin Gee (Pin Porter: Girl Detective)
  • Phillip Kennedy Johnson (Warlords of Appalachia; Smoketown)
  • Steve Beach (The Witching Hour; The Lost Boys of the U-Boat Bremen)
  • Mina Elwell (InferNoct)
  • T.E. Lawrence
  • Andrea Mutti (Rebels; Control)
  • Paul Mounts (Painkiller Jane; Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man)

Creators have donated their time and skills for this project and money raised will go towards printing and ISBN. All profit goes to charity.

The project hopes to raise $2,200 and ends December 26, 2017.

Review: InferNoct #1

Infernoct-1Sometimes a comic comes across your proverbial desk that you have no sweet clue what it’s about other than who it was published by and the issue number. Such is the case with InferNoct #1, published by Scout Comics and written by Mina Elwell who’s join by artist Eli Powell, colourist Tristan Elwell and letterer Marshall Dillon. At this point you now know more about this issue than I did when I picked it up, and in some ways that’s the best way to go into this comic, so I won’t talk about specific plot points or story aspects in this review.

InferNoct exudes atmospheric mood so thick that you can feel it seeping into your nose and down into your gullet where it swirls around for a bit before you’re able to catch a breath… and the cycle continues once again. This is a very good thing, especially for a comic that hovers somewhere around the horror tinged thriller corner of comics (which also feels like a gross over simplification of the comic).  The story telling is fantastically well paced, and reveals just enough to invest you in the story as you question just what the frag is going on. Believe me when I say this requires multiple reads.

This is an incredibly interesting and entertaining issue that has me more excited for the next issue than a lot of other, uh, generational comics that are also coming out at the moment. In fact, I made the comparison to a friend recently that InferNoct #1 would be the museum full of comic book art and history compared to the blank wall of the other comic. This has a unique freshness about it that pulls me in like no comic has since I read my first Valiant comic some three years ago. I’m all in for this series.

Story: Mina Elwell Art: Eli Powell
Colours: Tristan Elwell Letterer: Marshall Dillon
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: InferNoct #1

Infernoct-1Sometimes a comic comes across your proverbial desk that you have no sweet clue what it’s about other than who it was published by and the issue number. Such is the case with InferNoct #1, published by Scout Comics and written by Mina Elwell who’s join by artist Eli Powell, colourist Tristan Elwell and letterer Marshall Dillon. At this point you now know more about this issue than I did when I picked it up, and in some ways that’s the best way to go into this comic, so I won’t talk about specific plot points or story aspects in this review.

InferNoct exudes atmospheric mood so thick that you can feel it seeping into your nose and down into your gullet where it swirls around for a bit before you’re able to catch a breath… and the cycle continues once again. This is a very good thing, especially for a comic that hovers somewhere around the horror tinged thriller corner of comics (which also feels like a gross over simplification of the comic).  The story telling is fantastically well paced, and reveals just enough to invest you in the story as you question just what the frag is going on. Believe me when I say this requires multiple reads.

This is an incredibly interesting and entertaining issue that has me more excited for the next issue than a lot of other, uh, generational comics that are also coming out at the moment. In fact, I made the comparison to a friend recently that InferNoct #1 would be the museum full of comic book art and history compared to the blank wall of the other comic. This has a unique freshness about it that pulls me in like no comic has since I read my first Valiant comic some three years ago. I’m all in for this series.

Story: Mina Elwell Art: Eli Powell
Colours: Tristan Elwell Letterer: Marshall Dillon
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Mina Elwell talks InferNoct, Scout Comics

infernoctEarlier this year, publisher Scout Comics announced an impressive slate of new comics to be released throughout 2017. I talked to Mina Elwell, Media Director at Scout Comics and writer of InferNoct, an upcoming horror comic from Scout.

Graphic Policy: First, thank you for taking the time to talk to us! Could you please tell us a little about yourself?

Mina Elwell: Thank you! I think of myself as a research-based writer. I love hearing about bizarre things –history, mythology, biology, muttering on the subway. (InferNoct is mostly the last one.) Talking to me could go off in any direction.

GP: You’re writing InferNoct, which has been described as a “Lovecraftian” horror story. What can readers expect from this comic?

ME: There’s a kind of looming existential dread associated with Lovecraftian horror, going back to HP Lovecraft’s stories, that I wanted to capture with InferNoct. As horror fans, we’re a little desensitized to extreme gore. A lot of us grew up watching American slashers – we’re hard to shock. What makes Lovecraftian stories disturbing is the sense that we do not really understand each other, nothing we do really matters, and our sanity is fragile.

And tentacles. There will be tentacles.

GP: As a filmmaker, what is it like to switch between writing for film and writing for comics? Are there things that each allows you to do as a writer that you can’t do with the other?

ME: One of the things I really like about comics is how small our team is. Eli Powell and I are co-creators. Tristan Elwell is our color artist, Marshall Dillon is our letterer, and James Pruett is our editor. That’s it. I’m able to write for them and to them, with their specific styles in mind. My scripts have notes and suggestions for Eli, links to hats and sea creatures he might like to draw.

A film script, even for an indie film, is going to be seen by a lot more people. You’re writing for the lighting techs, and the PA’s, not just the director and the editor.

GP: How do these different genres and mediums allow you to explore different kinds of storytelling?

ME: Films (and TV of course) allow a wide variety of people to come together to create the same thing – it’s music, it’s cinematography, it’s costumes and props and makeup, it’s editing, it’s writing. It feels like you’re watching one vision, but you’re really watching the work of hundreds of people working for months.

Eli and I have always been on the same page. What you’re seeing is pretty close to what I first imagined.

GP: What were some of InferNoct’s influences? What drew you to the horror genre?

ME: Other than Lovecraft…

When I was creating the world of InferNoct, I thought a lot about the original 1973 Wickerman, and the way that our perceptions of the townspeople switch several times throughout. InferNoct is an American love letter to folk horror.

With Sam, the protagonist, thought about The Crying of Lot 49, my favorite Pynchon novel. She’s a very different kind of person than Oedipa, but they’re both trying to reinvent themselves, and struggling to face a new reality… or what reality means, depending on how you read it.

I really looked at Thomas Ligotti’s stories when I was thinking about fear. Nobody does fear better than Ligotti.

GP: Based on the description, InferNoct has a really intriguing and unique concept. It’s also not your first horror story. Do you find yourself trying to break or avoid horror tropes when conceptualizing new stories?

ME: In general, I try not to worry about it too much. If two people started out with the exact same concept, they’d probably end up with entirely different final projects. At the same time, most people are pretty familiar with the horror movie archetypes (thank you Scary Movie and Scream Queens) so there’s a danger that anything set in a cabin in the woods with several promiscuous teens will become a parody pretty quickly. Eli and I made the decision to take out a “Hello?” shouted into an empty house the other day… everyone knows that’s how you get killed.

GP: Though the comic isn’t out yet, you’ve been releasing Trauma Cleanup Reports on InferNoct’s Facebook page. This is a pretty awesome way to market the book, set the tone for the story, and show off Eli Powell’s art. How did idea for the trauma reports come about?

ME: I wrote the first Trauma Report as something to hand out at conventions – my first one was Flame Con. I was hoping it would be something to give people a taste of what the series would be like, through the eyes of a different protagonist. Once I started to actually meet people at the cons, and they were excited about the series, I realized I wanted to have something running until release that would help them remember us.

GP: Eli Powell’s art looks absolutely incredible in the previews I’ve seen. What does he bring to the story?

ME: Eli brings a lot of depth to the characters, especially Sam, who is the main character but doesn’t have a ton of dialogue. I think my favorite thing about Eli’s work on InferNoct though is that every time I look at it I find something new. He brings something so funny and twisted to it. I feel like I’m playing Where’s Waldo, except “Waldo” is the name of something slightly sticky with too many teeth.

GP: I was reading an article the other day that suggested humor is a necessary counterpoint to fear because it makes the fear more conquerable. For you, what role does humor play in InferNoct?

ME: Humor is a great way of dealing with fear. It’s probably the best way of exposing things for what they really are — though given our current political situation, it’s pretty clear that we can laugh at something and find it terrifying at the same time…

The humor in InferNoct is pretty dark. There are definitely a few “it’s funny because it’s so awful” moments. We meet a fairly absurd cast of characters who have some terrible things happen to them. Eli’s art is wonderful in that respect as well. In issue 1 I described our character Joey as distracted, and Eli did the most hilarious zoned out expression for him. Keep an eye out for that one…

GP: You’re also Scout Comics’ Media Director. As readers and comic fans, we get to see the final product rather than the behind-the-scenes. What are some of your responsibilities as Media Director? Is there anything that would surprise readers about your job?

ME: There are some really cool new series coming out of Scout at the moment, but since they’re brand new characters, you don’t necessarily know what to expect. I want to make sure it’s getting to the audience that’s going to fall in love with it. Michael Sanchez, our editorial director, is a real master of that as well.

GP: Last year, Scout announced an impressive slate of new comics. What Scout books are you looking forward to in 2017?

ME: There are so many good Scout books coming out this year. I’m really excited about Smoketown, which is coming out right now. Mindbender, written by our wonderful editor James Pruett, is available for preorder this month. If you’ve ever seen InferNoct at a convention, we’re often tabling with AC Medina, whose series Welcome to Paradise really developed alongside InferNoct. I’m looking forward to experiencing it as a reader.

GP: What are your favorite comics/comic-related movies or games?

ME: I grew up on Sandman. Is it surprising that I love horror and dark fantasy? For games, I’m all about Telltale right now. I love that style of episodic storytelling.

GP: I played through Telltale Batman about a month ago and am so ready for Season Two! I love comics because I find the episodic, interrupted narrative immerses you in the story and yanks you right back out. It’s really effective in building suspense between issues, and I was surprised how well that translated to video games.

ME: Absolutely, I think immersing the player in the world is something that Telltale does really well. They do a wonderful job expanding on existing universes. Wolf Among Us had some fantastic original characters that fleshed it out and made it feel real. Obviously, I love a strange cast in a strange world!

GP: Is there anything you’d like to discuss that I didn’t ask you?

ME: Most commonly asked question: Yes! The colorist Tristan Elwell is my father. I’ve been watching him make incredible pictures my whole life; it’s pretty exciting to have him working on something with me. Maybe someday I’ll be able to actually get him to come to a con.

GP: Having grown up with comics like Sandman and an artist/illustrator father, did you always know you wanted to enter the comics field in some capacity?

ME: I’d be happy to be telling stories in literally any medium you can think of, but I’m thrilled to be working on a comic with my dad, who introduced me to comics as a little kid. Does it get better than that?

GP: Thanks again!

Scout Comics Announces Four New Series at New York Comic Con

Kicking off Saturday at New York Comic Con, Scout Comics announced four brand new series coming to shelves in 2017.

WELCOME TO PARADISE

Written by A.C. Medina
Illustrated by Morgan Sawyer
Colored by Ross A. Campbell
Lettered by Micah Myers

Filled with deadly drag races for sport, routine mass killings called “the cleanings”, and where the common house is the size of a closet. Meet Manny, a fun loving, chop shop delivery boy, on the run and in possession of what may be humanity’s last hope. The only problem is Manny’s world is a bunker the size of California and just about everyone in it wants him dead.

welcome-to-paradise

INFERNOCT

Written by Mina Elwell
Illustrated by Eli Powell
Colored by Tristan Elwell
Lettered by Rob Jones

As Sam attempts to discover the real reason the people of her town are being destroyed, she becomes aware of mind-redning creatures that feed off the sanity of their victims. It’s up to her to do something about it… if she can only keep her grip on reality.

infernoct

LITTLE GUARDIANS

Written by Ed Cho
Illustrated by Lee Cherolis

Little Guardians tells the story of two young people switched at birth and now unknowingly living each other’s lives. Subira was supposed to be the next Guardian of Yowza Village, but she was born a girl. Instead she lives a quiet life working at The Item Shop never knowing what should have been. Idem trains to be the next Guardian and tries his best to be the warrior he was never meant to be. How will the next generation survive the choices made for them as strange incidents start plaguing the village and demon attacks appear to be on the rise?

little-guardians

MINDBENDER

Written by James Pruett
Illustrated by Federico De Luca

Alex was only 7 when he first awakened the power that left him comatose for nearly 16 years, an evolutionary power lying dormant in all mankind, bubbling within the unconscious mind waiting and yearning to be unleashed. Finally, a young child was able to touch this untapped force and the results were catastrophic. Those that would use his ability have been awaiting Alex’s awakening. Now, that wait has ended, and the world will soon learn the true potential of mankind. But will Alex be a vanguard for the world or will he be responsible for its annihilation?

mindbender