Tag Archives: microcosm publishing

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Far Sector #9

Wednesdays (and now Tuesdays) are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this week.

Batman/Catwoman #1 (DC Comics) – We read the first issue and mixed about it but this one is on a lot of people’s radars.

Black Widow #4 (Marvel) – This series has been fantastic so far. Full of action and humor, it’s just beyond entertaining, and this issue ups the “holy crap” factor.

Captain Canuck Season 5 #1 (Chapterhouse) – If you’re looking for superhero comics not from the big two, check this one out.

COVID Chronicles (AWA Studios) – Chronicling ten personal accounts from the frontlines of COVID-19. A perfect example of graphic journalism.

DCeased: Dead Planet #6 (DC Comics) – The series begins to up the action as numerous plot threads begin to come together for a hell of a battle.

E-Ratic #1 (AWA Studios) – A new superhero series staring a 15-year-old who can only use his powers for ten minutes at a time. The concept sounds interesting and it’s from the talented Kaare Andrews and Brian Reber.

Far Sector #9 (DC Comics/DC’s Young Animal) – Things become much clearer in this issue as we continue to question who we can trust.

Happy Hour #2 (AHOY Comics) – In a world where you can’t be unhappy, the state will go to horrific lengths to make that happen. The first issue was an intriguing concept and we want to check out more.

Hellboy & the BPRD: Her Fatal Hour (Dark Horse) – The follow up to “The Beast of Vargu”, Hellboy is always a good time to read.

Justice League: Endless Winter #1 (DC Comics) – The mini-event kicks off here and it feels like an old-school DC storyline.

Kill a Man (AfterShock) – The highly anticipated MMA graphic novel is here and it exceeds our expectations. A great mix of focusing on characters and grappling.

King in Black #1 (Marvel) – Marvel’s next big event kicks off here and it’s a hell of a start.

Knock Em Dead #1 (AfterShock) – A new series from Eliot Rahal who we’ll read no matter what it is. This is a supernatural horror taking place in the world of stand-up comedy. We’re intrigued.

Lumberjanes: End of Summer #1 (BOOM! Studios/BOOM! Box) – The beloved series wraps up.

M.O.D.O.K.: Head Games #1 (Marvel) – We laughed multiple times during this issue that’s a lot of fun. We can’t wait for the second issue.

Overwatch: Tracer – London Calling #1 (Dark Horse) – The hit game comes to comics and it’ll be interesting to see how this one goes over with that crowd.

Red Atlantis #2 (AfterShock) – The election thriller continues and we really want to know where this one’s going. Very timely and not a direction we’re expecting.

Seeds of Spring #1 (Microcosm Publishing) – A Canadian teenage exchanges books and tapes with a pen pal. The series juxtaposes the main character’s life with that of 19th-century Russian anarchist Peter Kropotkin.

Strange Adventures #7 (DC Comics/DC Black Label) – A hell of a reveal in this issue.

The Walking Dead Deluxe #4 (Image Comics/Skybound) – It’s been interesting reading these newly colored releases in the age of COVID. The context definitely has changed a bit since they were first released.

Review: GG Allin: Rock and Roll Terrorist Activity and Coloring Book

Shock rocker GG Allin was a rapist, abuser, and criminal. An activity and coloring book might seem odd, but it somehow works. His life and over the top performances are explored in this companion release to the graphic novel from writer/artist Reid Chancellor.

Though it’s an activity and coloring book, GG Allin: Rock and Roll Terrorist Activity and Coloring Book is also a condensed version of the companion graphic novel.

Story: Reid Chancellor
Art: Reid Chancellor

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Microcosm Publishing
Bookshop
Amazon

Microcosm Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Rock and Roll Terrorist: The Graphic Life of Shock Rocker GG Allin

Shock rocker GG Allin was a rapist, abuser, and criminal. His life and over the top performances are explored in this graphic novel from writer/artist Reid Chancellor.

Rock and Roll Terrorist: The Graphic Life of Shock Rocker GG Allin is a solid introduction to the musician whose life was full of controversy from early on.

Story: Reid Chancellor
Art: Reid Chancellor

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Microcosm Publishing
Bookshop
Amazon

Microcosm Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Kickstarter Spotlight: Hardcore Anxiety is a Graphic Guide to Mental Health Struggles

Hardcore Anxiety: A Graphic Guide to Punk and Mental Health tracks the mental health struggles of great punk rockers as creator Reid Chancellor also opens up about his own experiences.

The graphic novel focuses on the connections between punk rock and mental health. He brings to life punk’s ability to express rage, anxiety, depression, and insanity but also the community that makes life worth living delivering a helpful and message.

The Kickstarter being run by Microcosm Publishing ends April 26 at 11:33 EDT. Rewards include digtial and physical copies as well as exclusive posters and more.

Hardcore Anxiety: A Graphic Guide to Punk and Mental Health

Review: Six Days in Cincinnati

I recently read Afua Hirsch’s book, entitled Brit(ish), where the author talks about growing up black in England. She brilliantly dissects racism in its many shades by comparing her own life experiences to issues that affect the diaspora. What drew me to the book, was seeing the author explain to a mostly white panel, how racism envelopes the lives of people of color. The thing that affected me while watching the roundtable, was how quickly the other panel members, inserted the notion that racism does not exist.

This very insinuation, angered me, like it angered many viewers who saw it, as they do not know that they demonstrated were the microaggressions that encompass racism. The scary thing about racism, is that most of us, don’t have the pleasure of walking in our neighborhoods, no matter the time of the day. Our children don’t have the luxury of playing with toy guns or wearing anything hiding their face, and even then, they are not safe. The fatalities of this epidemic known as racism and the disease known as implicit bias are countless, and one such incident is covered in the protests which took over a city in Six Days in Cincinnati.

We are introduced to the reason for the protests, Timothy Thomas, a young man, who escaped the violence of Chicago, to only be killed in Cincinnati, by the police. Through a series of interviews, the reader is introduced to a city in a war with itself, where, race, class, and violence had taken over the city. By the time Thomas arrives in the city, Cincinnati, had a war on black men, as fourteen black men before him had been killed in 6 years by the police, under sketchy circumstances. By book’s end, Timothy’s mother gets restitution, but eventually moves back to Chicago, and as for the city, progress remains slow, even ten years later.

Overall, an engaging book which reminds the reader the reason Black Lives Matter. In order for all lives to matter, people of color must also be seen as human. The stories told by Dan Mendez Moore are personal, heartbreaking and relevant. The art by Moore serves the story. Altogether, a book, which echoes many of the same sentiments heard around protests not only in America but around the world, we too, are human.

Story: Dan Mendez Moore Art: Dan Mendez Moore
Story: 10 Art: 7.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Yo Miss: A Graphic Look at High School

Growing up, going to school, in New York, I was fortunate to go to private school and public school, when most ids usually get the latter. When I came back from Living in Trinidad, my grandparents wanted me and my sister to go to one of the best schools. So, we went to the same Catholic school, that my cousins went to, where we went to regular classes and even ah to go to mass once a week. So, when my parents came to live with us in New York, they decided that I should go to public school.

Public school was a world away from what I saw at Catholic school, kids were the same, teachers and classes not so much. Most of the teachers did not care whether we learned nor cared to even show us who they are. There were only a handful of teachers at Catholic school and public school who cared. So, when I read Yo Miss! Lisa Wilde’s year as a public-school teacher at a charter school, she reminded of some of them.

We are introduced to Lisa, a teacher who see as hopeful as most teachers, to change the world and mold young minds. Her zeal for the work soon wanes as the reality of teaching kids are considered “second chance”, becomes quite arduous. Throughout her many trails over the year, she is reminded of a quote by Maya Angelou, “All great achievements require time”, where she finally sees her breaking through to the kids she teaches. By the end of the book and her year’s journey, Lisa changes her students and her students have evolved her.

Overall, an engaging book, where one might have thought to be a fish out of water story turns out to be an examination of how one can overcome misconceptions. The story by Wilde is funny, heartfelt and refreshingly honest.  The art by Wilde is throwback to the old school newspaper strips. Altogether, an charming memoir which will leave the reader both entertained and illuminated.

Story: Lisa Wilde Art: Lisa Wilde
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall:10 Recommendation: Buy

Weekly Graphic Novel Review: Henry & Glenn Forever + Ever & Adult Activity Book

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. We take out the indie cult comic classic Henry & Glenn!

Henry & Glenn Forever + Ever The Completely Ridiculous Edition collects over 13 years of comics from over 50 creators.

Henry & Glenn Adult Activity & Coloring Book allows you to break out the crayons with games, mazes, puzzles, and more!

Check out both today in comic shops and in book stores Setpember 12 and November 7.

Get your copy now. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Henry & Glenn Forever + Ever The Completely Ridiculous Edition
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

Henry & Glenn Forever Adult Activity & Coloring Book
Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

Microcosm Publishing provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Review: Soviet Daughter

As a teacher once told me years ago in high school, “we are making history every day”. No one ever really understands when they are in the middle of history when most people think of history happening, as for most of us, we are just living.  For people in the middle of history, they are surviving, the amount of bravery that it takes to stand up in an insurrection, cannot be understated, as the many revolutions around the world, have shown it is equal parts faith and fortitude. It reminds me of my family and their reactions to when Ninoy Aquino got shot in the Philippines back in 1983.

Our family had left the Philippines two years prior, but still had extended family and friends there, as the country’s disposition towards the government became untenable, and eventually lead to the ousting of President Marcos. My generation, only knew of what our parents and their brothers and sisters told us, of how it was then and why they felt they had to leave, some of their answers more cryptic than others. Their disdain never quite followed us even though many of us has some of that anti-establishment fervor in our blood, but those ghosts not only haunted them, it haunted us as well. This is what Soviet Daughter reminded me of when I read Julia Alekseyeva’s graphic novel of three generations of her family from when the family was entrenched in the USSR to them finally arriving in Chicago.

In the first few pages, we are introduced to the author, who we find out was a very close to her great grandmother, who had died when was 100 years old, and left her with a memoir, which was not to be read until after she died. What Julia, has found was not only an autobiography of her great grandmother but the story of Russia. We are introduced to family members throughout, showing how difficult life was in Russia, before and after both World Wars. By the end of the book, the author is both devastated and lost when she learned what she did about her great grandmother, a woman though lose to her , she barely knew.

The heartbreaking story of anti-Semitism, World Wars, Stalinism, xenophobia, Communism, and resilience amongst these three generations of women will have you rooting for all of them. The story by Alekseyeva is heart wrenching, with moments of levity, but leave the reader besides themselves. The art by Alekseyeva is appropriate and feels more like a scrapbook for this family than sequential art. Overall, this is a story that will make you wish you knew more about those in your family who have ascended the earth.

Story: Julia Alekseyeva Art: Julia Alekseyeva
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Six Days in Cincinnati: A Graphic Account of the Riots That Shook the Nation

In 2001, a young black man named Timothy Thomas was shot by police, and the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood of Cincinnati erupted in protest. It was the first major urban uprising since the Rodney King riots a decade previously in LA. Ten years later, Ferguson happened, and Cincinnati was largely forgotten. Until now.

Dan Mendéz Moore was 17 at a time and a budding activist. As an adult, he looks back at this life- and history-changing week, and through interviews with participant, vividly tells the story, in the form of a nonfiction graphic novel (or as we like to call it, comics journalism). This is the first non-academic book about this story. We hope it isn’t the last.

The result is moving, informative, and provides an immediacy and emotional urgency to the story that text alone rarely conveys. Discover this important and relevant piece of history.

You can get the riveting graphic novel Six Days in Cincinnati now from Microcosm Publishing.

 

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever Gets a Ridiculous Edition and Coloring Book

The cult comic Henry & Glenn: Forever & Ever is getting two new releases for you to enjoy the craziness. Microcosm Publishing has announced Henry & Glenn – Forever & Ever: The Completely Ridiculous Edition and The Henry & Glenn Adult Activity & Coloring Book.

The greatest love story every told has finally been released in graphic novel form. This epic tome features twenty short stories about the domestic life of “Henry” and “Glenn” and sometimes their neighbors “Daryl” and “John.” Henry & Glenn: Forever & Ever is by Rob Halford and Tom Neely and released as individual issues before being collected. The book collects four serialized comics, the trade paperback, the original 6×6″ book, and adds 16 never-before published pages, including new stories, pin up art, and full color covers from the original series.

Limited to 1000 copies, Henry & Glenn – Forever & Ever: The Completely Ridiculous Edition will be released September 12 and is available for pre-order now.

The Henry & Glenn Adult Activity & Coloring Book is out November 7 and has you busting out your rainbow crayons and make your own mark on the ongoing story of two tough men learning to express their emotions, together. It’s also available for pre-order.

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