Tag Archives: lavie tidhar

Preview: Adler #5

Adler #5

Author(s): Lavie Tidhar
Artist(s): Paul McCaffrey
Cover Artist(s):
COVER A: Gary Erskine
COVER B: Paul McCaffrey

THE FINAL BATTLE BEGINS!
Adler and her team of Victorian heroines face-off against AYESHA’S army of AMAZONS!
Written by World Fantasy Award Winner, Lavie Tidhar. In the vein of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen!

Adler #5

Preview: Adler #4

Adler #4

Author(s): Lavie Tidhar
Artist(s): Paul McCaffrey
COVER A: JOHN ROYLE
COVER B: PAUL MCCAFFREY
COVER C: VICTORIAN HOMAGE (ANDREW LEUNG)

From the World Fantasy Award-winning writer Lavie Tidhar and artist Paul McCaffrey (DC’s Men of War, TMNT) comes an all-new story written in the vein of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen!

Irene Adler and her team of Victorian heroines encounter a mysterous villain, even more dangerous that Moriarty!

Adler #4

Review: Adler #3

Adler #3

Much like a traveler on a seventeenth-century steamship, I’ve waited months to return to Victorian England. The wait is finally over as Adler returns to shelves this week with Adler #3. If you need a reminder of how the series began, you can check out my thoughts of the first issue. Then in the second issue, we were introduced to the series’ true “Big Bad.” The last issue also set up the challenges the heroines will face moving forward. Issue #3 expands on these challenges by setting the stakes Irene Adler, Jane Eyre, and Lady Havisham will find themselves pitted against.

After the first issue, each subsequent issue has opened with a “the story so far” section. This section is a nice touch, especially because it’s written like a journal entry and not plain exposition. It’s interesting that we’re still meeting the characters and Tidhar does a great job of using their introductions to increase the reader’s sense of mystery. Even though we’re starting to get an idea of the plot, Tidhar purposely leaves it unclear as to how all the characters fit into that plot. As a result the character development naturally moves the plotlines forward. Often in comic books these two aspects of storytelling run parallel to one another. In Adler, Tidhar blends these two literary elements into an organic storyline.

I really like how McCaffrey draws the characters. Each of the heroines in this series has their own unique look and is drawn like an actual woman. McCaffrey also does a great job drawing the period setting. Everything from the backgrounds to the buildings to the clothing fits the image I have in my head when I think of Victorian England. However, I continue to be baffled by the page layouts. The scene transitions aren’t always clear, and it can make it hard to follow the story. There are occasionally boxes that denote a scene’s location, which helped me keep track of the events in each scene. Yet there were several places across the last two issues, especially as new characters are randomly introduced, that I was forced to go back a few pages and re-read the comic in order to understand what events were occuring in seperate scenes or within the same scene.

Adler #3 was definitely worth the wait. The third issue of this ongoing series had great pacing, fun character moments, and exciting sequences. I’m an avid reader and have read many of the classics. My favorite part about this series is seeing which details from history and literature Tidhar chooses to keep and which he chooses to embellish or take in his own unique direction. In the first issue we get an alternate take on Jane Eyre’s life after the conclusion of her eponymous novel. Last issue, Tidhar took us on a deep dive into the Sherlock Holmes mythos. This issue was my favorite so far as it brought in some of the scientists of the Victorian era. Plus we get our first real glimpse into some steam-punk tech promised by the original description of the series. Much like the works that inspired many of its characters, Adler is quickly shaping up to be a classic.

Story: Lavie Tidhar Art/Color: Paul McCaffrey Letterer: Simon Bowland
Story: 10 Art: 7.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Titan Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology – Kindle – Zeus Comics

Preview: Adler #3

Adler #3

Author(s): Lavie Tidhar
Artist(s): Paul McCaffrey
Cover Artist(s): Rian Hughes (CVR A), Paul McCaffrey (CVR B), Victorian Homage Cover (CVR C)

From the World Fantasy Award-winning writer Lavie Tidhar and artist Paul McCaffrey (DC’s Men of War, TMNT) comes an all-new story written in the vein of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen!

Irene Adler and her team of Victorian heroines encounter a mysterous villain, even more dangerous that Moriarty!

Adler #3

Preview: Adler #2

Adler #2

Author(s): Lavie Tidhar
Artist(s): Paul McCaffrey
Cover Artist(s): Butch Guice (CVR A), Paul McCaffrey (CVR B), Victorian Homage Cover (CVR C)

After uniting some of the most famous heroines of the Victorian age including Jane Eyre, Miss Havisham and Marie Curie, Irene Adler must finally come face-to-face with Sherlock Holmes’s greatest nemesis, Moriarty!  World Fantasy Award winning writer Lavie Tidhar and TMNT artist Paul McCaffrey present an alternate history of the greatest literary characters of the 19th Century in the vein of Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen!

Adler #2

Review: Adler #1

Adler #1

Adler #1 is kind of a nerdfest for anyone who enjoys Victorian literature with such luminaries as Jane Eyre, Estella Havisham, the vampire Carmilla, and even Ayesha from H. Rider Haggard’s She. Writer Lavie Tidhar and artist Paul McCaffrey let the women of these (For better or worse) long enduring late 19th century British novels have just as much fun as the male characters as they engage in shoot outs, witty repartee, and cloak and dagger scheming.

The story begins in the dark, PTSD-inducing imperalist haze of the Second Boer War in South Africa, which establishes Jane as a capable protagonist, who is relegated to the position of nurse even though she does the work of a doctor. While Irene Adler is much more verbose, Jane is a keen observer with McCaffrey giving he quick glances and facial expressions that look like processing or deep thinking. She is a sympathetic POV character and is much more than the sidekick that Adler monologues to as shown by the last several intrigue-filled pages.

Paul McCaffrey has already worked on the comic adaptation of Kim Newman’s fantastic Victorian alternate history novel Anno Dracula (Seriously, it kept me awake on a 10 hour drive from Washington, DC to Louisville, Kentucky.) so cobblestone streets, corsets, cravats, and steampunk blimps come naturally to him. His art is easy to follow and is naturalistic, but a little messed up just like Steve Dillon’s work. McCaffrey’s one weakness is a case of same face with the female characters who aren’t Ayesha, but thankfully, he emphasizes their different hair colors and fashion choices. Carmilla has a Goth thing going for her, Irene Adler is more steampunk, and Estella is an upper class mad scientist. Fashion and costume choice definitely helps establish character in Adler #1.

Another amusing part of Adler #1 is how minimized, and honestly pathetic, the role of the male characters are in the narrative. Irene Adler trolls Moriarty, who comes across as a villain of the week instead of a conniving Big Bad like Andrew Scott’s portrayal in BBC’s Sherlock that had the Internet shrieking every time he was even hinted to appear on the screen. Also, Holmes himself is a non-entity that doesn’t even appear on-panel because he’s too busy chasing rumors of giant hounds on the moors. Instead Adler #1 is about the extreme competence of Irene Adler as well as Jane Eyre trying to find her place in early 20th century England while Ayesha and Carmilla scheme and hint at plots just beginning to unravel.

With more of an emphasis on action, flashy, yet readable visuals, and character personality instead of mystery, Adler #1 is wonderful first course into Lavie Tidhar and Paul McCaffrey’s female-fronted world of Victorian character crossovers. The relationship between Jane and Adler is intrigued, there’s some gunplay, and Tidhar and McCaffrey definitely left me wanting more. Adler is a penny dreadful for the 2020s. I’m looking forward to see the relationship between Jane and Irene Adler develop just as much as the next cool late 19th century/early 20th century female historical figure or literary character cameo.

Story: Lavie Tidhar Art: Paul McCaffrey Letters: Simon Bowland
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Titan Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Adler #1

Adler #1

Author(s): Lavie Tidhar
Artist(s): Paul McCaffrey
Cover Artist(s): Christian Ward (CVR A), Paul McCaffrey (CVR B), Victorian Homage Cover (CVR C), B&W Variant (CVR D)

For Sherlock, there was only ever one woman – now Irene Adler is on a mission to take down Moriarty! It’s the League of Extraordinary Gentlewomen, as Adler teams up with a host of famous female faces from science, history and literature to defeat the greatest criminal mastermind of all time!

Adler #1

SDCC 2013: Titan’s New Projects

At San Diego Comic-Con, Titan Comics, the new venture from publishing giant, Titan, announced a brand-new wave of creator-owned titles set for 2014! The new titles span a mix of established comics and novelist talent, as well as up-and-coming creators and artists from whom you’ll soon be hearing much more – such as Victor Gischler, Tazio Bettin, Pat Mills, Carl Potts, Larry Stroman, Lavie Tidhar, Paul McCaffrey and Des Taylor!

The new wave of titles includes assassin black-comedy Accident Man co-created by 2000AD legend Pat Mills with a cover by the incomparable Howard Chaykin; a brand-new chapter of long-running science-fiction gem Alien Legion, by fan-favorite creative team Carl Potts and Larry Stroman; ladies of literature action-adventure Adler by novelist Lavie Tidhar and artist Paul McCaffrey; adrenal grindhouse-flick Sally Of The Wasteland by Victor Gischler and artist Tazio Bettin, with cover by blazing Image stalwart Tim Seeley; and femme-fatale espionage caper Scarlett Couture by famed good-girl artist Des Taylor.

At SDCC, Titan Comics made a splash with numerous launches including fantasy The First Kingdom Vol.1: The Birth of Tundran by comics legend Jack Katz; new horror fantasy collection Razorjack by Watchmen colorist John Higgins; the Eagle-Award-winning comedy Thrud the Barbarian by writer/artist Carl Critchlow; afterlife thriller Numbercruncher by Si Spurrier, artist P.J. Holden and colorist Jordie Bellaire; SF and fantasy anthology Monster Massacre; genre-mashing hormonal superhero Sharky by Dave Elliott and Alex Horley; and videogame tie-in Devil May Cry: The Chronicles of Vergil.

AccidentMan_GN_Cvr_CBR Adler-promo-image-CBR ALEG_CBR Sally-CBR scarlettcover_CBR