Tag Archives: k. michael russell

Preview: Infinite Dark #6

Infinite Dark #6

(W) Ryan Cady (A) Andrea Mutti, K. Michael Russell (CA) Nick Robles

Paranoia reigns supreme on the Orpheus, as fledgling leaders must choose between two terrifying unknowns. Meanwhile, Deva Karrell investigates nightmarish crimes with an unlikely ally.

Infinite Dark #6

Preview: Infinite Dark #5

Infinite Dark #5

(W) Ryan Cady
(A) Andrea Mutti, K. Michael Russell
(CA) Nick Robles​

The passengers of the void ship Orpheus survived the end of the universe, station-wide sabotage, and even the machinations of an Entity from beyond the stars. All that’s left now is to survive each other.

Review: Infinite Dark #1

The universe ended, but onboard the void station Orpheus, a skeleton crew of humanity survived: the last two thousand souls, waiting for a second big bang that may never come. Now, two years into their voyage, Security Director Deva Karrell investigates the station’s first murder-and the otherworldly motives behind it.

Humanity surviving some calamity on a spaceship/station is a story that is a dime a dozen. There being a murder on a spaceship/station is a common story too. However, the location being a space station that has survived the end of the universe? That’s pretty unique.

Writer Ryan Cady delivers a first issue that builds up the tension to a point the story shifts. What begins as a sci-fi story becomes horror by the end. Much of the first issue focuses on the reality these survivors live in. They’re the last of humanity. They witnessed the rest die. And they witnessed the universe die. Now, they’re surrounded by nothing and internally are struggling with that reality. They are experiencing survivor’s guilt.

Now, a crime has been committed and that leads to that twist. While the comic could easily devolve into a person who has lost their mind and that spreading across the ship resulting in carnage and death, it would seem we’re getting something different. That last panel especially left me pondering where this is all going.

The art by Andrea Muti with color by K. Michael Russell and lettering by Troy Peteri is solid mixing in the two genres quite well. There’s an unease in the art that emphasizes the coldness of it all. That’s helped by the color which uses lots of cold blues and grays and only goes elsewhere for emphasis.

The issue is a fantastic debut that blends genres and delivers an ending that’s something that’s unexpected. It seems the comic is going in directions that’s unexpected and will explore some really interesting topics. With a unique setting, this is a start that’s a hell of a debut.

Story: Ryan Cady Art: Andrea Muti
Color: K. Michael Russell Letterer: Troy Peteri of A Larger World
Story Editor: Alex Lu
Story: 8.25 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Infinite Dark #1

Infinite Dark #1

(W) Ryan Cady (A/CA) Andrea Mutti (C) K. Michael Russell (L) Troy Peteri

The universe ended, but onboard the void station Orpheus, a skeleton crew of humanity survived: the last two thousand souls, waiting for a second big bang that may never come. Now, two years into their voyage, Security Director Deva Karrell investigates the station’s first murder-and the otherworldly motives behind it.

Science Fiction and Horror Collide in Infinite Dark

Image Comics and Top Cow have announced an all-new, sinister ongoing science-fiction series—Infinite Dark—by Ryan Cady and Andrea Mutti with colorist K. Michael Russell that will hit stores this October.

In Infinite Dark, the universe has ended, but humanity has survived. For years, the passengers and crew of the vessel Orpheus found the endless void between realities to be a surprisingly peaceful home.

Then they found a body—bloodied, brutalized, and surrounded by inscrutable runes. As Security Director Deva Karrell investigates the Orpheus’ first murder, she’ll come face to face with a horror from beyond the confines of time itself…

Infinite Dark #1 will launch from Top Cow and Image Comics this October 2018.

Cassie’s back in the gory, sexy, twisted, funny Hack/Slash: Resurrection, Vol. 1

Cassie Hack returns in Tim Seeley’s Hack/Slash: Resurrection, Vol. 1 with Tini Howard as the new series writer along with artists Celor and K. Michael Russell. The trade paperback collects issues #1-6 and hits stores this April.

In Hack/Slash: Resurrection, Vol. 1, Cassie Hack has been living off the grid, but when a new monstrous threat arises to torment the kids at Camp Indigo River, it’s time for Cassie to pick up the baseball bat once again.

Hack/Slash: Resurrection, Vol. 1 (Diamond Code FEB180576, ISBN: 978-1-5343-0666-0) will hit comic shops on Wednesday, April 25th and bookstores on Tuesday, May 1st.

Preview: Postal: Laura

POSTAL: LAURA

Story: Bryan Hill
Art: Isaac Goodhart
Color Art: K. Michael Russell
Letter Art: Troy Peteri
Cover: Raffaele Ienco

Laura has spent her life protecting her town, the criminals within it, and her son’s future. Now her son might choose to leave her behind to start a new life away from her. Laura Shiffron punishes those who want to abandon her rules—with death—but will she apply the same brutal ideology to her own son?

Review: The Eighth Seal and Glitterbomb #1

glitterbomb_01-1Earlier this summer I read James Tynion and Jeremy Rock’s The Eighth Seal, released in July by IDW Publishing. I enjoyed it but passed on reviewing because I didn’t have much to say on it at the time. Yet I recently read Image Comic’s new release Glitterbomb, by Jim Zub, and found enough common threads between them that I decided to revisit. Both center on female characters in visible professions where they are subjected to scrutiny and criticism; both women are slowly gaining awareness of dark forces within them, and both begin by diving right into the action.

We meet Farrah, the aging, down-on-her-luck actress at the forefront of Glitterbomb, as she is being grilled by an agent who can’t find an angle that makes her sellable. He is less than tactful in expressing this concern, and by the second page his head is being violently penetrated by a stinger-tipped tongue that has thrust forth from Farrah’s mouth and into his. As it retracts we see her features transform from black-eyed and split-lipped back to the Jane Average from page 1. “Oh God… It happened. AGAIN.” From there the issue takes us back through the last six hours of Farrah’s life. She encounters a manipulative, platitude-spewing competitor at an audition, returns to her anxiety-inducing homelife as a frazzled single mother, and reveals to the readers what, exactly, happened along the way to warrant her saying “AGAIN.”

EighthSeal_TPB-CoverEighth Seal’s headliner, First Lady Amelia Greene, begins her story at her therapist’s office, where she is prompted to share the details of “another incident.” She tells him of a vision she experienced, in which storytime with a local kindergarten class descended into feeding time for a six-eyed, tentacled monstrosity that burst through her human shell. The arc of this collection follows Amelia as her visions become increasingly common and invasive, drawing intense media scrutiny over her regular fainting spells and strange behavior. We receive a few hints at the nature of the monster that’s haunting her, but I found myself feeling less satisfied by the end than I did with Glitterbomb. Seal, at 122 pages, is the first TPB of five and takes its time developing, whereas Glitterbomb manages to set an equally satisfying amount of world-building into motion in a premiere issue of 40 pages.

Both monsters offer satisfying displays of body horror, but I personally prefer the more simple design of Glitterbomb’s baddie. Whereas the creature Amelia sees herself as is more aesthetically violent, and her position as first lady makes the scale of potential destruction more global, I like the restrained design of Farrah’s possessor better. (It also makes for a nice visual vaginal metaphor in the spirit of Predator, or the facehuggers of Alien.) A key difference is that Amelia’s alter-ego presents itself to her internally, at least at this point in the series. The physical transformation always comes in the form of a vision that manifests itself in the real world as a blackout period. Farrah, however, experiences her physical change live and in-person.

Jeremy Rock’s linework in Seal is very rounded and clean, a look that I usually associate with cartoons that are kid friendly. I don’t think that was an active intention in designing the content, but it did make the content that much more effectively unsettling. Glitterbomb, illustrated by Djibril Morrissett-Phan, is slightly more gritty in its look. The aesthetic differences here are pretty fitting; Amelia is a public political figure with a refined reputation to uphold, and Farrah is an out of work actress going through rough times.

The coloring work is excellent in both. While they each utilize similar palettes, Nolan Woodard and Michael Spicer bring deeper saturation and more lighting effects to Seal while K. Michael Russell’s work on Glitterbomb has more texture to it. Despite both being digital review copies, Glitterbomb still looked like a paper comic compared to Seal. Comparing them side-by-side made me think of the difference between film and video.

Overall I enjoyed both quite a bit, but it took a second reading of Eighth Seal to appreciative it, and there could have been more of a payoff by the end of the first volume. Both titles left me wanting more, but I predict (and hope) Glitterbomb will deliver more swiftly.

The Eighth Seal TPB

Story: James T. Tynion IV Art: Jeremy Rock
Story: 6 Art: 7 Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

 

Glitterbomb #1

Story: Jim Zub Art: Djibril Morrissett-Phan
Story: 7.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

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