Tag Archives: julia alekseyeva

Exclusive: Check Out Geof Darrow’s Original Art for the Next Two Volumes of Full Bleed

IDW Published is currently running a Kickstarter for Full Bleed Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation which runs until January 10.

The print only hardcover magazine features a long-lost interview with bestselling comic book writer Grant Morrison, discussing his feud with writer Alan Moore; a conversation between music legends Metallica’s Kirk Hammett and Anthrax’s Scott Ian; interviews with with comic book legend Geof Darrow, and contributions by Julia Alekseyeva, Abdulkareem Baba Aminu, Peter Bagge, Tini Howard, Gideon Kendall, Roger Langridge, Joe Lansdale, Erin Nations, Benjamin Percy, Jon Raymond, Sara Richard, Vivek J. Tiwary, Noah Van Sciver; Shannon Wheeler, and many more.

On top of some impressive entertainment, this is your chance to own original art of Geof Darrow‘s.

The Geof Darrow Original Art Tier nets you Signed & Numbered Limited Versions of the next 2 volumes of Full Bleed: The Comics & Culture Quarterly, along with signed limited prints for those two volumes (Artists TBD) along with slipcase for all FOUR volumes. Plus a free copy of Las Vegas Repo #2! Plus an enamel Full Bleed “Sphere” pin (3rd in the series).. AND get your name in the next volume of Full Bleed ! Along with one piece of completely ORIGINAL ART by the legendary Geof Darrow!

We’ve got an exclusive first look at the original art by Darrow.

The Kickstarter runs until January 10 and Full Bleed Vol. 3: Heavy Rotation features:

  • The Grant Morrison Interview, Part One, By Gavin Edwards, illustration by Peter Bagge
  • Monsters of Rock: An interview with Metallica’s Kirk Hammett, and Anthrax’s Scott Ian, concerning their shared history and love of all things horror and genre, By Russell Sheath, illustration by Tony Shasteen
  • We Don’t All Live in a Yellow Submarine: An Essay, By Vivek J. Tiwary
  • The Watering Shed: A brand-new short story featuring Hap & Leonard, By award-winning novelist Joe Lansdale
  • Lover’s Eyes: An Essay, By Tini Howard, with illustrations by Sara Richard
  • Arizona Daisy: A new comic, By Roger Langridge
  • May 1968: The Revolution that Almost Was – A comic essay, By Julia Alekseyeva
  • Black’s In: When a “Blackout” is a Good Thing, Text and illustrations by Abdulkareem Baba Aminu
  • Following the Bloody Trail of the Shaolin Cowboy: An interview with Geof Darrow, featuring never-before-seen art, by Hannah Means-Shannon
  • The Underdream: A new comic, By Josh O’Neill and Gideon Kendall
  • The Lost Boys of the U-Boat Bremen: Chapter Three, By Phillip Kennedy Johnson and Steve Beach
  • Down Mexico Way: A travel log, By Jarrett Melendez, with illustration from Danica Brine
  • Uncharted Part Two: A short story, By Benjamin Percy with spot illustrations by Brent Schoonover
  • The Shapes: A new comic, By Adam Knave & Andrew Losq
  • New short comics from Shannon Wheeler, Jennifer Hayden and Noah Van Sciver
  • A personal tale of young love gone wrong, By award-winning novelist and screenwriter, Jon Raymond
  • The Big Smoke, a photo essay, By Joel Meadows
  • Blade Runner: Technology Steals the Soul — An essay, By Tom Waltz, with illustration by Santipérez
  • The Five Most Important Underground Cartoonists, an essay, By Bob Levin
  • Home: A new comic by Erin Nations

Review: Soviet Daughter

As a teacher once told me years ago in high school, “we are making history every day”. No one ever really understands when they are in the middle of history when most people think of history happening, as for most of us, we are just living.  For people in the middle of history, they are surviving, the amount of bravery that it takes to stand up in an insurrection, cannot be understated, as the many revolutions around the world, have shown it is equal parts faith and fortitude. It reminds me of my family and their reactions to when Ninoy Aquino got shot in the Philippines back in 1983.

Our family had left the Philippines two years prior, but still had extended family and friends there, as the country’s disposition towards the government became untenable, and eventually lead to the ousting of President Marcos. My generation, only knew of what our parents and their brothers and sisters told us, of how it was then and why they felt they had to leave, some of their answers more cryptic than others. Their disdain never quite followed us even though many of us has some of that anti-establishment fervor in our blood, but those ghosts not only haunted them, it haunted us as well. This is what Soviet Daughter reminded me of when I read Julia Alekseyeva’s graphic novel of three generations of her family from when the family was entrenched in the USSR to them finally arriving in Chicago.

In the first few pages, we are introduced to the author, who we find out was a very close to her great grandmother, who had died when was 100 years old, and left her with a memoir, which was not to be read until after she died. What Julia, has found was not only an autobiography of her great grandmother but the story of Russia. We are introduced to family members throughout, showing how difficult life was in Russia, before and after both World Wars. By the end of the book, the author is both devastated and lost when she learned what she did about her great grandmother, a woman though lose to her , she barely knew.

The heartbreaking story of anti-Semitism, World Wars, Stalinism, xenophobia, Communism, and resilience amongst these three generations of women will have you rooting for all of them. The story by Alekseyeva is heart wrenching, with moments of levity, but leave the reader besides themselves. The art by Alekseyeva is appropriate and feels more like a scrapbook for this family than sequential art. Overall, this is a story that will make you wish you knew more about those in your family who have ascended the earth.

Story: Julia Alekseyeva Art: Julia Alekseyeva
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy