Tag Archives: gene colan

Review: The Death of Captain Marvel

The classic story, The Death of Captain Marvel, is back in an all-new printing! This trade collects Marvel Super-heroes (1967) #12-13, Captain Marvel (1968) #1 and #34, Marvel Spotlight (1979) #1-2, and Marvel Graphic Novel #1: The Death of Captain Marvel by Stan Lee, Roy Thomas, Jim Starlin, Steve Englehart, Doug Moench, Gene Colan, and Pat Broderick.

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores January 15th! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Haunted Horror #32

Haunted Horror #32

Various (w) • George Evans, Gene Colan, Pete Morisi & Sheldon Moldoff (a) • Matt Baker (c)

Your favorite horror anthology heads for the high seas of screams, in this sinisterly saturated selection of soaking-wet weirdness straight from Davey Jones’ locker! Classic creeps from the deeps are surfacing on a tidal wave of terror! Hold your breath—Haunted Horror #32 is just around the bends! Get it? Get it!

FC • 32 pages • $4.99

Preview: Gene Colan’s Tomb of Dracula Artist’s Edition

Gene Colan’s Tomb of Dracula Artist’s Edition

Marv Wolfman (w) • Gene Colan (a & c)

Tomb of Dracula by Wolfman, Colan, and Palmer has long been considered one of the best Marvel Comics of the 1970s. Colan’s atmospheric artwork was the perfect companion to Wolfman’s dark and foreboding stories—together they formed a classic series.

This Artist’s Edition collects five fantastic stories, plus an incredible gallery section.

HC • BW • $125.00 • 144 pages • 12” x 17” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-217-2

Review: Inhumans: Beware the Inhumans

It’s Tuesday which means it’s new comic book day at book stores! This week we’ve got the Inhumans!

Inhumans: Beware the Inhumans collects Marvel Super-Heroes (1967) #15, Incredible Hulk Annual #1, Fantastic Four (1961) #81-83 and #99, Avengers (1963) #95 and #105, Amazing Adventures (1970) #1-10, and Not Brand Echh #12 by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Roy Thomas, Gerry Conway, Gary Friedrich, Archie Goodwin, Arnold Drake, Neal Adams, Gene Colan, Mike Sekowsky, Marie Severin, John Romita, and Tom Sutton.

Get your copy. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

A People’s History of the Marvel Universe, Week 8: Cap Saves Altamont

Face front, true believers!

As I discussed in Week 5, a lot of work had to be done to make Captain America work for the 1960s. But in addition to the political work I talked about (and will discuss a lot more in the future), it also meant a good deal of cultural work as well.

Sometimes, this could be rather awkward, as Stan Lee (48 at the time) hustled like hell to keep Marvel comics relevant in an industry whose primary consumers were teenagers in the midst of one of the largest generational divides in U.S history:

And as my colleague Elana notes, it often takes comics a decade or more to catch up to cultural changes, which can lead to awkward juxtapositions where characters like Nightwing are rocking a 70s disco v-neck costume well into the 90s (oh no! I just got DC in my Marvel!)

But sometimes, sometimes, even the squarest comic book writers and artists can catch onto a wavelength from youth culture and create something fascinating. Hence why in Marvel continuity, Captain America saved the Altamont Free Concert from the (copyright-friendly equivalent of the) Hells Angels:

Captain America is kind of an interesting choice for this storyline, because you have a member of “the Greatest Generation” (albeit one who is mentally and physically in his mid-20s rather than almost in his 50s) stepping in-between a conflict within the Baby Boomers between hippies and bikers. At the same time, as I discussed before, Cap was in a searching and receptive mode as he sought to find a new identity for Steve Rogers, and that brought him in synch with both aspects of the counter-culture:

On the one hand, Cap basically agrees with the hippie’s critique of his generation; on the other, Cap’s solution for how to find his identity is to get a motorcycle and go looking for America. And sure enough, the moment Cap gets onto a motorcycle, he gets arrested by cops who are hassling bikers and mistake him for a member of the Satan’s Angels who they are arresting on sight (which is surprisingly sympathetic to the perspective of the biker gang who are the antagonists of the issue). In turn, the Satan’s Angels decide to break Cap out of prison out of a commitment to the code of the road:

Incidentally, I love that the visual reference for the leader of the Satan’s Angels has some pretty strong resemblance to Marlon Brando in the Wild One. Unlike in classic biker films, however, the Satan’s Angels aren’t the antagonists of Cap #128 because they are threatening the values and mores of Square America, but because they are threatening that most precious and beautiful of things, a hippie rock concert:

In another case of Captain America comics being surprisingly positive about the counter-culture, Stan Lee and Gene Colan present this hippie rock concert as an unambiguously positive force, preaching the message of peace and love, and who share with Cap a common belief in the universal equality and brotherhood of mankind. Part of the reason for this positivity is that Issue #128 came out in August of 1970, less than a year after the Altamont Free Concert. As with the historical concert (which featured Jefferson Airplane, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Rolling Stones, and where the Grateful Dead were supposed to appear), this concert is publicized as a free concert and open to all comers. And as with Altamont, which was supposed to be a “Woodstock West,” this concert is clearly more about spreading a cultural and political message.

And as with Altamont, the concert is threatened by the disdain that the Satan’s Angels have for hippies, centered around their anti-war politics. Here, the biker leader “Whitey” expresses a very specific hatred of “peaceniks” and the “yella-bellied,” and threatens violence against his own kid brother if he tries to become a “flower child.”

Given that Stan Lee is writing this issue, this is pretty savvy cultural commentary. For all that Ken Kesey and Allan Ginsburg thought that the Hells Angels represented fellow spirits – chronicled in Tom Wolf’s Electric Koolaid Acid Test – there was very little in common between the Hells Angels and the hippie movement beside their mutual alienation from mainstream society. Indeed, much of the Hells Angel’s membership were military veterans who found the biker lifestyle an alternative to transitioning back into the civilian world, and were actively and violently anti-anti-war.

As Hunter Thompson describes in his book, Hells Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga, the combination of close quarters and intellectual mis-understanding between the Hells Angels and the hippie movement was a lethal combination:

The Hells Angels’ massive publicity – coming hard on the heels of the widely publicized student rebellion in Berkeley – was interpreted in liberal-radical-intellectual circles as the signal of a natural alliance. Beyond that, the Angels’ aggressive, antisocial stance – their alienation, as it were – had a tremendous appeal for the more aesthetic Berkeley temperament.

…The honeymoon lasted about three months and came to a jangled end on October 16, when the Hells Angels attacked a Get Out of Vietnam demonstration at the Oakland-Berkeley border. The existential heroes who had passed the joint with Berkeley liberals at Kesey’s parties suddenly turned into venomous beasts, rushing on the same liberals with flailing fists and shouts of “Traitors,” “Communists,” “Beatniks!” When push came to shove, the Hells Angels lined up solidly with the cops, the Pentagon and the John Birch Society. And there was no joy that day in Berkeley, for Casey had apparently gone mad.

The attack was an awful shock to those who had seen the Hells Angels as pioneers of the human spirit, but to anyone who knew them it was entirely logical. The Angels’ collective viewpoint has always been fascistic…The Angels, like all other motorcycle outlaws, are rigidly anti-Communist. Their political views are limited to the same kind of retrograde patriotism that motivates the John Birch Society, the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party. They are blind to the irony of their role…

Hence why it was a historically bad idea for the Rolling Stones’ manager Sam Cutler to hire the Hells Angels to be security for a hippie rock concert, and then to pay them in $500 worth of beer, which they proceeded to drink on the spot. Mutual antagonism between the crowd and the Angels lead to escalating violence – with the Angels chucking full beer cans and wielding pool cues and motorcycle chains, initially to keep the crowd away from the stage, but increasingly in a series of tit-for-tat fights. The violence escalated – Denise Jewks of the Ace of Cusp had her skull fractured by a thrown beer bottle, Marty Balin of Jefferson Airplane got knocked unconscious by an Angel, Mick Jagger was punched in the head, and Meredith Hunter was stabbed to death by Hells Angel Alan Passaro. (As all of this was filmed by a documentary crew at the time, you can watch the whole event here.)

Altamont was almost instantly turned into a symbol of the excesses of the counter-culture, the dark shadow of Woodstock, and a sign of the end of the hippie movement. As Richard Brody argued much later, “What emerges accursed is the very idea of nature, of the idea that, left to their own inclinations and stripped of the trappings of the wider social order, the young people of the new generation will somehow spontaneously create a higher, gentler, more loving grassroots order. What died at Altamont is the Rousseauian dream itself.”

But in the Marvel Universe that didn’t happen, because Captain America was on the scene to stop the Satan’s Angels and save the day:

If you step back and look at it, not only is this a fight of motorcycle vs. motorcycle, but also a fight between two veterans over how to deal with the counter-culture and the related anti-war movement. And not only does Captain America oppose the Satan’s Angels physically, but as is appropriate for a character who would absolutely play a Warlord in D&D 3.5 Edition, Cap’s example inspires the gentle hippies to enter the fray in defense of their new defender:

The implicit argument is rather interesting, suggesting that the hippie movement’s non-violence is simply because they disagree with the cause that violence is being urged for. It’s an interesting little bit of culture-jamming, positioning Captain America as the Hippy Defender and suggesting that the kids are alright, because with the right symbol and the right cause to fight for, they’ll engage in all-American fisticuffs. However, the hippies can’t take down the sheer power of a motorcycle gang on their own, so there will always be a need for Captain America’s mighty shield:

On its own, Captain America #128 is a rather disposable one-shot. But what interests me is the broader cultural impact of Cap’s intervention in the Marvel Universe. For example, if Altamont is seen as a success in Earth-616 due to Captain America, does Don MacLean still write “American Pie” as a despairing elegy to the lost innocence of rock and roll?  Is Peter Fonda’s character in Easy Rider named Captain America not as a satirical jab at 60s Americana but rather because Captain America is seen as a protector of the hippie movement and an endorsement of the counter-culture from the living embodiment of American idealism?

Speaking as someone who loves the fact that Marvel’s shared universe was set in the real New York, one of the things that I’ve felt hasn’t been done enough in the Marvel Universe is an exploration of how the presence of superheroes since WWII had influenced American culture, especially not in comparison to Alan Moore’s Watchmen or Publick and Hammer’s Venture Brothers. We know that Janet Van Dyne is a renowned fashion designer, but we rarely see ordinary people in street scenes wearing Van Dyne-inspired ensembles. We know that the beatniks down at Coffee A Go-Go became enthralled with Beast’s enormous feet, so show me Alan Ginsberg’s ode to Hank’s hoofs.

In other words, if Captain America is a symbol, show us what that symbol came to mean for the generations who grew up with him after his rebirth from the ice in the Mid-60s…

Preview: Jughead’s Time Police

JUGHEAD’S TIME POLICE

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE
Script/Art: Gene Colan, Doug Crane, Jon D’Agostino, Mindy Eisman, Barry Grossman, Pat Kennedy, Rudy Lapick, Rex Lindsey, Rich Margopoulos, Tom Moore, Bill Yoshida
Cover: Rex W. Lindsey, Rosario “Tito” Peña
On Sale Date: 9/11
120-page, full color comic
$3.99 U.S.

Get ready for a wild ride through time! Jughead has been drafted into a time-traveling police force, tasked with keeping history from going haywire. Is Jughead the right kid for the job? Find out in this digital-only collection! Collects the complete Jughead’s Time Police storyline epic!

JugheadsTimePolice-0

 

Yoe And IDW Lift The Ban On “Zombies”!

YOE AND IDW LIFT THE BAN ON “ZOMBIES”!
The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics open for another epic dose of terror May 30th!

[Zombies Cover]San Diego, CA (May 29, 2012) – In the shuffling, deranged footsteps of Dick Briefer’s Frankenstein and Bob Powell’s Terror comes a thrilling, spine-tingling collection of classic, taboo horror comics.  Hitting shelves with a vengeance tomorrow, IDW Publishing and Yoe Books are proud to present ZOMBIES!

It’s difficult to imagine an era where work from comics titans like Wally Wood, Gene Colan, Bob Powell, Reed Crandall, Jack Cole, and Lou Cameron was kept away from readers, but these 1950’s zombie tales were so terrifying, parents and politicians the nation over made sure they were banned!

Conjured back to print by Eisner-winning Editor and designer Craig Yoe, these classic, lost tales are being reproduced in astonishing detail in a beautiful hardcover edition that belies the unstoppable, macabre forces within!

Complete with an introduction by the book’s co-Editor Steve “Karswell” Banes, host of the popular “The Horrors of It All” vintage comics blog, ZOMBIES is a must-own tome for lovers of the undead!

ZOMBIES ($21.99, 148 pages, hard cover, full color) will be available in comic book stores May 29, 2012. ISBN 978-1-61377-213-3.

Visit IDWPublishing.com to learn more about the company and its top-selling books. IDW can also be found at http://www.facebook.com/#!/idwpublishing and http://tumblr.idwpublishing.com/and on Twitter at @idwpublishing.

About IDW Publishing

IDW is an award-winning publisher of comic books, graphic novels and trade paperbacks, based in San Diego, California. Renowned for its diverse catalog of licensed and independent titles, IDW publishes some of the most successful and popular titles in the industry, including: Hasbro’s The TRANSFORMERS and G.I. JOE, Paramount’s Star Trek; HBO’s True Blood; the BBC’s DOCTOR WHO; Nickelodeon’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles; Toho’s Godzilla; Wizards of the Coasts Magic: The Gathering and Dungeons & Dragons; and the Eisner-Award winning Locke & Key series, created by best-selling author Joe Hill and artist Gabriel Rodriguez. IDW is also home to the Library of American Comics imprint, which publishes classic comic reprints, and Yoe! Books, a partnership with Yoe! Studio.

IDW’s critically- and fan-acclaimed series are continually moving into new mediums. Currently, Jerry Bruckheimer Films and Disney are creating a feature film based on World War Robot, while Michael Bay‘s Platinum Dunes and Sony are bringing Zombies vs. Robots to film.

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It’s was a pretty quiet Saturday, but you guys seem to love your Boom! Studios.  Traffic spiked as people devoured two previews.  So, which series should I start reading?  I regularly read Incorruptible and Irredeemable, so those are out, but what else?  Darkwing Duck, The Amory Wars, Cthulhu, 28 Days Later? While you contemplate that, here’s the news you might have missed.

Around the Blogs:

Bleeding Cool – In Memory – The Gene Colan ScholarshipIt’s a great thing to see and so quick.  Please donate and help a future artist.

The Mary Sue – Nom Nom Nom: Captain America DoughnutsAnyone dumb enough to try to collect and save this for resale later?

Bleeding Cool – My Monthly Curse by Phill Hall #16 – And PartnerI really should start sharing my retail stories, sadly not many of them are suitable for the public.

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It’s Saturday, yay!  Here’s the news you might have missed including the passage of a legend.

Around the Blogs:

The Source – Gene Colan (1926-2011)

When Comic Books Ruled the Earth – Gene Colan 1926-2011

MTV Geek – A Legend Passes: Comic Book Artist Gene Colan (1926-2011)

Bleeding Cool – The Ken Penders/Archie Comics Lawsuit ContinuesSeems to be a hell of a lot of these going around.

Comicvine – Daredevil Returns To New York This July!Should be interesting….

Bleeding Cool – No Such Word As Superhero – DC’s Retailer Roadshow Hits Baltimore – Collectors Cornered #2Some more info about the DC relaunch/reboot.

Con Coverage:

Bleeding Cool – San Diego Comic Con Exclusive T-Shirts – And Where They Came From

The Beat – SLG to demo digital comics at Comic-Con

Southeast Missourian – In its sixth year, Cape Comic Con continues to grow as it celebrates comics and games

CBR – Marvel Announces Creator Lineup for 2011 New York Comic Con

Marvel Congratulates The 2010 Eisner Award Winners

Official Press Release

Marvel Congratulates The 2010 Eisner Award Winners

Each year the Eisner Awards ceremony recognizes the best and brightest creators for their contributions to the comics industry. Marvel is pleased to congratulate Ed Brubaker, Gene Colan, Skottie Young and Eric Shanower who all took home an award from the 2010 ceremony held during Comic Con International in San Diego, this past weekend.

Marvel creators earned Eisner Awards for the following:

Best Writer – Ed Brubaker (CAPTAIN AMERICA, DAREDEVIL, CRIMINAL, INCOGNITO)

Best Single Issue (or One-Shot) – CAPTAIN AMERICA #601 by Ed Brubaker and Gene Colan

Best Limited Series Or Story Arc – THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young

Best Publication For Kids – THE WONDERFUL WIZARD OF OZ by Eric Shanower and Skottie Young

Marvel would also like to congratulate all the other nominees and winners at the 2010 Eisner Awards.

If you haven’t checked out these award winning stories, head on out to your local comic shop and pick up these great collections!

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