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Get an Early Look at Guardians of the Galaxy #8

Guardians of the Galaxy #8

Written by Al Ewing
Art by Marcio Takara
Colors by Federico Blee
32 PGS./Rated T+
In Shops: Nov 04, 2020
SRP: $3.99

At the diplomatic conference to decide the future of space, there’s been a murder most foul – and one of the delegates is responsible!

It’s up to Ranger Rocket to save Marvel Boy from execution, solve the mystery and find the real killer – while a ticking bomb counts down to zero!

Can things get worse? It’s GUARDIANS. Things always get worse.

Guardians of the Galaxy #8

Early Review: Champions #1

Champions #1

The recent iterations of Champions have been something I’ve generally enjoyed. They always had a solid concept of the “next generation” of heroes stepping in and doing what the adults can’t, won’t, or don’t think is important. The basic mantra has been it’s their future and they’re fighting for it. That concept has been the underlying idea for the various volumes. The execution has varied, often sidetracked by “events”. The latest volume, the third since 2016, takes the premise of the team and lays it all out there. Champions #1 plants a flag and wears its attitude and purpose on its sleeve.

Written by Eve L. Ewing, Champions #1 kicks off as part of the “Outlawed” storyline. Unlike other events, “Outlawed” is squarely focused on the younger generation of heroes. After an accident by Viv Vision causes massive destruction, a law is passed outlawing younger heroes unless they have a mentor. The story is a bit too similar to what happened in Marvel’s first Civil War but unlike that event, this one is much tighter in those impacted.

Ewing brings the Champions into the era of David Hogg and Greta Thunberg and all of the other Millennials and Generation Z who are making their voices heard fighting injustices. This is “kids” fighting for their future. But, Ewing does it right. Not every member of the Champions is in board and many disagree with how things are going about. Ewing doesn’t present this generation as a monolithic viewpoint.

The story Ewing presents is solid. It feels like it takes a lot from stories we’ve seen in the past, Pump of the Volume comes to mind as one, but it’s all done so well. The story keeps readers on their toes and who winds up in which corner and each individual’s viewpoints are presented so that the comic isn’t so cut and dry. It keeps readers on their toes and keeps things interesting.

Simone Di Meo provides the line art with Federico Blee on color and Clayton Cowles lettering. The art is fantastic delivering a youthful energy about the story and also delivering emotional punch. The panel work is fantastic keeping the visuals interesting and packing in a lot. The angles and breaking up of the page delivers a “flash/swipe” like feel that adds to the energy of the comic. The style of the comic as a whole is a bit exaggerated in everything but it enhances the story. Instead of falling into a comical space, the facial expressions and body language helps nail down the emotional punch Ewing is going for. It’s needed to make it all work and a different style would have the issue likely fall flat our be a bit more dour than it’s supposed to be.

Champions #1 is a hell of a debut delivering a start that wears its thoughts and heart on its sleeve. This is a flag planted as to what this series is about. And delivers conflict in that even the next generation isn’t in lockstep as to how they should go about making the world a better place. It’s a beginning, and probably the best so far of the three volumes. It not only has a vision for what it wants to say but how it’s going to say it. Much like Millennials and Gen Z, it understands its politics is a part of its story. Champions #1 has no problem talking about them and trying to fight for what’s right.

Story: Eve L. Ewing Art: Simone Di Meo
Color: Federico Blee Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Snake Eyes: Deadgame #1

Snake Eyes: Deadgame #1

Rob Liefeld shows that he can still draw one hell of an action sequence in Snake Eyes: Deadgame #1, which is non-stop guns, blades, and ninjas with guest appearances from other G.I. Joe characters like Scarlett and Roadblock. I’m not super familiar with the G.I. Joe franchise except for catching the first Channing Tatum movie on cable a while ago. However, that isn’t a problem as Liefeld and scripter Chad Bowers set up all the life vs death, immortal vs mortal, good vs. evil, and best of all, ninja vs ninja context and fixings you need throughout the story. Throw in Adelso Corona’s enhancements to Liefeld’s disciplined linework and bulky, yet restrained figures, and Federico Blee’s spot-on colors, and Snake Eyes is a popcorn action flick in a summer sadly bereft of them because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

But back to the comic! People shit on Rob Liefeld’s art style (Especially his anatomy) everywhere from Tumblr to fly-by-night YouTube channels, but they forgot that comics aren’t about photorealism or perfectly rendering the human form: they’re about storytelling. And Liefeld is one hell of a storyteller, especially when it comes to dynamic, boisterous action layouts. (See his collaboration with Mike Mignola on X-Force #8.) This is evident from the first page of Snake Eyes where two immortal beings face each other with Blee using a scarlet background to hint at the mayhem to come. Utilizing a single page, Liefeld and Chad Bowers establish the main thrust of the plot and the MacGuffin before getting to the good stuff: Snake Eyes wordlessly infiltrating a secret base. Liefeld uses a variety of types of shots to show him breaking in before unleashing his inner martial arts filmmaker and using tight close-ups as Snake Eyes takes down the baddies using a full page pin-up shot to let the story breathe and give some the old Wizard reading fans something to smile at.

Rob Liefeld doesn’t use double page spreads until later in the story when Snake Eyes fights against the series’ Big Bad. Everything has been a walk in the park up to this point, and the wide screen layouts coupled with Federico Blee’s red and black and Bowers’ taunting dialogue raise the stakes for Snake Eyes. Also, Snake Eyes whips out his dual pistols for the first time giving his enemy a little taste of the 21st century. The variety of combat techniques keeps the fights interesting as Snake Eyes’ opponent shows a little bit of a horror side to go with the bloody katanas, guns a-fucking-kimbo action of the majority of the comic. He’s connected to Snake Eyes’ past, but not in an annoying way, and mostly his purpose is to show that this badass ninja might need a little help from his bros, er, the Joes moving forward.

Snake Eyes: Deadgame #1

In a reversal from a lot of comic book reviews, I feel like I’ve focused a lot on the Snake Eyes’ visuals and want to discuss Chad Bowers’ skill at capturing the voice of a character, who doesn’t have vocal cords. Bowers’ captions never overwhelm Liefeld, Corona, and Blee’s art adding just the right amount of flavor and context to Snake Eyes’ actions. In fact, they remind of a less verbose Chris Claremont in the first Wolverine miniseries that with Frank Miller and Joe Rubinstein’s art truly established him as both a force of nature and a noble warrior. Snake Eyes has a mission to fulfill (That might be connected to destiny and all that fun stuff.), and he only commits acts of violence in service of that mission, which is actually a rescue to start out with. The full balaclava and visor get-up that he wears reinforces this efficient, non-sadistic approach as Snake Eyes is a smooth killer and not raging out all over the place. In contrast, Bowers writes quippier dialogue for the other Joe’s more in line with a traditional action movie.

In the final analysis, Snake Eyes: Deadgame #1 is a damn good ninja comic, a showcase for Rob Liefeld’s action storytelling, and in my case, a strong introduction to the G.I. Joe universe. This first issue shows Snake Eyes’ strength as a solo act, and I’m interested to see what Liefeld, Chad Bowers, Adelso Corona, and Federico Blee do with an ensemble cast in subsequent issues.

Story/Art: Rob Liefeld Script/Dialogue: Chad Bowers
Additional Inks: Adelso Corona Colors: Federico Blee
Letters: Andworld Design
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.4 Recommendation: Buy

IDW provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Review: Annihilation: Scourge

The Cancerverse has invaded the Negative Zone and Earth’s heroes must gather to stop the spread before it breaks into their own universe.

Annihilation: Scourge collects Annihilation: Scourge Alpha, Fantastic Four, Nova, Silver Surfer, Beta Ray Bill, and Omega.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg, Michael Moreci, Christos Gage, Dan Abnett
Art: Juanan Ramirez, Cian Tomey, Ibraim Roberson, Alberto Albuquerque, Diego Olortegui, Paul Davidson, Manuel Garcia
Color: Federico Blee, Carlos Lopez, Jay David Ramos, Erick Arciniega, Matt Milla, Rachelle Rosenberg
Ink: Juan Vlasco, Cam Smith, Scott Hanna
Letterer: Cory Petit, Joe Sabino, Travis Lanham, Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops now and bookstores on March 24! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon: https://amzn.to/39RJ8Ey
Kindle/comiXology: https://amzn.to/38Ns29i
TFAW: https://shrsl.com/25zrw
Zeus Comics: https://www.zeuscomics.com/products/69085/annihilation-scourge-tp?tag=graphicpolicy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dawn of X Vol. 3

Want to get into Marvel’s X-Men relaunch? They’ve made it easy with Dawn of X collections that package all of the comics of the same number!

Dawn of X Vol. 3 includes the third issue for X-Men, Marauders, Excalibur, New Mutants, X-Force, and Fallen Angels.

Story: Jonathan Hickman, Gerry Duggan, Tini Howard, Ed Brisson, Benjamin Percy, Bryan Edward Hill
Art: Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan, Michele Bandini, Elisabetta D’Amico, Marcus To, Flaviano, Joshua Cassara, Szymon Kudranski
Color: Sunny Gho, Federico Blee, Erick Arciniega, Carlos Lopez, Guru-eFX, Frank D’Armata
Letterer: Clayton Cowles, Cory Petit, Travis Lanham, Joe Caramagna, Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now and bookstores on March 24! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Guardians of the Galaxy #2

Guardians of the Galaxy #2

Things wrap up quick in Guardians of the Galaxy #2. In what could have been a drawn-out four or five-issue arc, instead, we get things shaken up after just two. And wow, things are shaken up.

Writer Al Ewing keeps things moving at a frenetic pace. This rag-tag version of the Guardians of the Galaxy are up against the gods of Olympus. Things aren’t looking good. They’re outnumbered and outclassed and taking heavy losses. But, these are the Guardians of the Galaxy and that’s what they’re generally up against.

What Ewing delivers though is heart. There’s some events in the comic that are sure to be fake outs. But, there’s emotion on multiple levels. There’s the desperation of the team. There’s the hurt of the battle. Finally, there’s the loss of a team member. Guardians of the Galaxy #2 has a flair for the dramatic and pulls it all off with highs and lows.

The art by Juann Cabal helps a lot. With color by Federico Blee and lettering by Cory Petit the art delivers some of that emotion. There’s shocking horror moments delivered just through visiuals. But, it’s how each character acts and what’s on their faces that really delivers the punches to the gut. Beyond that, there’s some beautiful art with one particular page being absolutely beautiful and had me lingering to take it in.

Guardians of the Galaxy #2 wraps up a quick story arc. In those two issues it delivers a rollercoaster ride of a story. There’s some shocking moments and a true feeling of desperation throughout. It captures that underdog essence that makes Guardians of the Galaxy a great team and series.

Story: Al Ewing Art: Juann Cabal
Color: Federico Blee Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 9.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation:
Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Star Wars: Target Vader

Darth Vader is on the hunt for a criminal syndicate but he doesn’t know that same syndicate has hired a group of bounty hunters to take Vader out once and for all.

Star Wars: Target Vader collects #1-6.

Story: Robbie Thompson
Art: Marc Laming, Cris Bolson, Stefano Landini, Marco Failla, Robert Di Salvo, Georges Duarte
Color: Neeraj Menon, Rachelle Rosenberg, Jordan Boyd, Andres Mossa, Federico Blee, Erick Arciniega, Giada Marchisio
Lettering: Joe Caramagna, Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops and bookstores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Dawn of X Vol. 1

Dawn of X is well into the launch and Marvel is bundling issues of the new X-Men line of comics in easy to consumer trades.

Dawn of X Vol. 1 includes first issues of X-Men, Marauders, Excalibur, New Mutants, X-Force, and Fallen Angels. Read reviews of each issue at the links.

Story: Jonathan Hickman, Gerry Duggan, Tini Howard, Ed Brisson, Benjamin Percy, and Bryan Edward Hill
Art: Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan, Matteo Lolli, Marcus To, Rod Reis, Joshua Cassara, Szymon Kudranski
Color: Sunny Gho, Federico Blee, Erick Arciniego, Rod Reis, Dean White, Frank D’Armata
Letterer: Clayton Cowles, Cory Petit, Travis Lanham, Joe Caramagna, Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now and bookstores on February 25! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Guardians of the Galaxy #1

The Guardians of the Galaxy have saved the cosmos once again and deserve to retire… but how long will that last and who will stand up?

Story: Al Ewing
Art: Juann Cabal
Color: Federico Blee
Letterer: Cory Petit

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Marauders #2

Marauders #2

Marauders #2 is an interesting comic. It’s very much a two-person play acted out between Emma Frost and Sebastian Shaw. And we witness their chess game as pieces are moved around the board to add depth to their machinations.

Written by Gerry Duggan, the comic revolves around Frost and Shaw’s new venture as they deliver Krakoa’s medicine to the world. It’s a dance and game between the two as they use their roles for their own gain in various ways. Digs are made as to their financial status or what they’re trying to do. All of it a waltz for a final panel reveal that’s been choreographed since the first issue. None of the comic is surprising or shocking but it sets up the status-quo nicely focused on the roles, and goals, of each of these two manipulators.

The comic also continues the reverberations of the “death” of Charles Xavier and directly addresses the likelihood of his return through Krakoa’s resurrection. It also has the most realistic reaction, really any reaction, as the team goes out to get drunk and tattoos. It’s a nice moment that makes the characters gel and shows off their personalities.

The art by Matteo Lolli is nice. Along with color by Federico Blee and lettering by Cory Petit, the style is one that differs itself from the other X comics. The body language and facial expressions of the characters really deliver the mood and personalities. There’s also some nice design work and action as the comic balances the more subtle scenes with the more active.

Also standing out in the issue is a letter concerning the naval status of the new mutant nation. It continues to dance around real world issues such as sovereignty and a threat the mutant nation is perceived as. It’s a threat that might be justified based on statements such as one Storm makes in the issue.

Marauders #2 is a solid comic adding more of a focus on the series. It plants a flag as to how it differs from the other series and teases some conflicts to come. Marauders #2 is the play to its sister series’ action flick. It’s a comic whose character interactions makes it stand out.

Story: Gerry Duggan Art: Matteo Lolli
Color: Federico Blee Letterer: Cory Petit Design: Tom Muller
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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