Tag Archives: Ewan McGregor

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Star Wars: Obi-Wan Kenobi Cast Revealed

Production for Obi-Wan Kenobi begins soon and Star Wars and Disney has revealed the cast for the series.

Ewan McGregor returns in the title role and will be joined by Hayden Christensen who will reprise his role as Anakin Skywalker/Darth Vader. Joining them are Moses Ingram, Joel Edgerton, Bonnie Piesse, Kumail Nanjiani, Indira Varma, Rupert Friend, O’Shea Jackson Jr., Sung Kang, Simone Kessell, and Benny Safdie.

Joel Edgerton will likely be returning for his role as Owen Lars which he played in Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. He’ll be joined by Bonnie Piesse who played Beru in both those films as well.

Obi-Wan Kenobi will air on Disney+.

Obi-Wan Kenobi

Birds of Prey Gets a Second Trailer

With less than a month to go, Birds of Prey has gotten a second trailer giving us a better idea as to what we can expect. Gotham’s worst brings out their best. Meet Harley Quinn, Black Canary, Huntress, Renee Montoya, and Cassandra Cain.

You ever hear the one about the cop, the songbird, the psycho and the mafia princess? Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) is a twisted tale told by Harley herself, as only Harley can tell it. When Gotham’s most nefariously narcissistic villain, Roman Sionis, and his zealous right-hand, Zsasz, put a target on a young girl named Cass, the city is turned upside down looking for her. Harley, Huntress, Black Canary and Renee Montoya’s paths collide, and the unlikely foursome have no choice but to team up to take Roman down.

Margot Robbie returns as Harley Quinn, alongside Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Huntress; Jurnee Smollett-Bell as Black Canary; Rosie Perez as Renee Montoya; Chris Messina as Victor Zsasz; and Ewan McGregor as Roman Sionis. Newcomer Ella Jay Basco also stars as Cassandra “Cass” Cain in her feature film debut.

Directed by Cathy Yan from a script by Christina Hodson, the film is based on characters from DC Comics.

Birds of Prey is in theaters February 7, 2020.

Birds of Prey Gets a Poster

Joker is less than a month of way but we’re already looking forward to the next film based on DC Comics properties, Birds of Prey, aka Birds of Prey and the Fabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn.

The movies is based on the DC property that brought together numerous female heroes for a kick-ass group.

The film stars Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn, Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Helena Bertinelli/Huntress, Jurnee Smollet-Bell as Dinah Lance/Black Canary and Rosie Perez as Renee Montoya who will be going up against Ewan McGregor as Black Mask and Chris Messina as Victor Zsasz. Ella Jay Basco is also listed as Cassandra Cain. The film is directed by Cathy Yan from a script by Christina Hodson. Chuck Dixon, Jordan B. Gorfinkel, and Greg Land are credited on the comics side.

Birds of Prey is out February 7.

Is That a Birds of Prey Teaser?

A new Youtube channel called CheekySneakyPeeky (which joined on January 25) has posted up a video that looks to be a teaser for the upcoming film Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn).

This is on top of a first look at Margot Robbie who will reprise her role as Harley Quinn.

Birds of Prey is currently in production and stars Robbie, Mary Elizabeth Winstead as Helen Bertinelli/Huntress, Derek Wilson as Tim Evans, Ewan McGregor as Black Mask, Matthew Willig as Happy, Jurnee Smollett-Bell as Dinah Lance/Black Canary, Chris Messina as Victor Zsasz, and Rosie Perez as Renee Montoya.

Movie Review: Christopher Robin

christopher robin poster“Oh Pooh. You’re not a bear of very little brain. You’re a bear of humongous heart.”

Ewan McGregor as a middle-aged, overworked Christopher Robin says this to his former childhood toy, but he may as well have been describing this movie.  Heavy on sentiment and nonsense, light on plot or fresh character takes this isn’t a bad movie. It’s quite literally the cinematic equivalent of hugging your childhood stuffed animal or security blanket, remembering when times were simpler and having a twinge of midlife crisis.

The original Disney The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh begins with a narrator telling us “This could be the room of any small boy. But it just so happens to belong to a boy named Christopher Robin.” This movie — a live action sequel to the previous Pooh catalog — could be about the lost childhood of any middle aged man, but it just so happens to belong to a man named Christopher Robin. In post-war England, he finds himself under the thumb of a lazy and unscrupulous boss (Mark Gatiss) who forces him to work long hours and weekends — forgoing a planned holiday with his wife (the always lovely Hayley Atwell) and precocious daughter. This is familiar Disney material– father loses his way, and needs some magical element to help him reclaim his childhood wonder and imagination.

Meanwhile, deep in the Hundred Acre Wood of Christopher Robin’s childhood imagination, Pooh awakens after a long rest and can’t find his friends. Instead, he travels to London to fetch Christopher Robin from the tedium of planning an important meeting and off they go to find ‘Tigger, Kanga, Roo, Piglet, Eeyore, Owl, and Rabbit. And of course, wackiness ensues, and they have t fight nasty heffalumps and woozles and learn to have childlike wonder again.

A lot of praise needs to go to Ewan McGregor for his work here, as the entire film rests on his shoulders. In much of the movie, it’s just him acting against an imaginary stuffed animal. He’s really charming and delightful, and the supporting cast are almost equally as god. The voice cast here playing the stuffed animals are also great. Legendary voice artist Jim Cummings basically is Pooh and Tigger, having inhabited these roles for decades now.  There’s also some brilliant casting of Brad Garrett as Eeyore and Peter Capaldi as Rabbit, but they are sadly underused as most of the film concentrates only on Christopher Robin and Pooh.

As stated previously, this is a script of very little brain, and very much predictability. But it’s pure, uncut Disney nostalgia straight from the source. For those who grew up with Pooh and are bringing their children or grandchildren to see this, you will enjoy this in direct relation to how much nostalgia you have for this particular property or classic Disney in general. It will generally feel like this movie was almost made more for adults than children– the message almost certainly is. And for true Disney superfans, stay through the credits to see and hear Richard Sherman (who co-write the original Pooh songs and half of the classic Disney songbook) perform a new song he wrote specifically for this film. He’ still got it.

Someone needed to remind these folks they were making a children’s movie, as the moral center seems more focused on shaming workaholic middle aged people. And the tone of the film for its first act is extremely dour. It finally picks up in predictable fashion and ends strong with a lot of heart. But with Paddington 2 having hit earlier this year, it’s unfortunate that Disney’s return to this familiar territory didn’t land better as it can’t stack up to the more charming sequel. There are also several Disney movies with this same basic idea, and this compares even less favorably against those.

3.5 out of 5 stars

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