Tag Archives: emi lenox

Emi Lenox Returns to Black Hammer with Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise

High school can be hell for anyone, but it’s especially difficult for teenage girls spawned by the emissary of a Cthulhu god! Based on Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston’s Eisner Award-winning series, Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise explores the realities of attending high school as an outsider. Black Hammer co-creator Jeff Lemire pens this one-shot. Superstar artist Emi LenoxBlack Hammer colorist Dave Stewart, and legendary letterer Todd Klein join him on this new adventure. The beautiful cover and variant covers are by Emi Lenox and Jill Thompson.

In Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise, Cthu-Louise struggles and is teased at school due to her monstrous appearance. Finally fed up with the bullying and abuse, she decides she will do anything to make herself “normal.” It’s Carrie meets Call of the Cthulhu!

The Black Hammer: Cthu-Louise one-shot goes on sale December 12, 2018.

Black Hammer Gets a Library Edition this October

Black Hammer fans will have another opportunity to visit their favorite superhero farm in the Black Hammer Library Edition Volume 1Black Hammer Library Edition Volume 1 collects the first chapter of the highly acclaimed, Eisner Award-winning superhero saga in a deluxe, oversized hardcover format from Jeff Lemire and Dean Ormston.

Mysteriously banished from existence by a multiversal event, the old superheroes of Spiral City now lead simple lives on a bizarre farm from which there is no escape! But as they employ all of their super abilities to free themselves from this strange purgatory, a mysterious stranger works to bring them back into action for one last adventure!

This new edition features a beautiful cover by Dean Ormston with colors by Dave Stewart and collects Black Hammer #1-13, the Giant-Sized Annual, sketchbook extras, and more! This tome features art by Dean Ormston, David Rubín, Dustin Nguyen, Emi Lenox, Nate Powell, Matt Kindt, Ray Fawkes, and Michael Allred.

Black Hammer Library Edition Volume 1goes on sale October 24, 2018, and is available for preorder. This new edition is 408-pages and retails for $49.99.

BOOM! Studios and Hero Initiative Announce “The Adventure Time 100 Project”

BOOM! Studios, Cartoon Network, and Hero Initiative, the charity that helps comic book creators in medical and financial need, have announced The Adventure Time 100 Project, a new graphic novel celebrating the eponymous franchise in stores May 2018. Finn, Jake and the entire Adventure Time crew take center stage in Hero Initiative’s famous “100 Project” format, which invites 100 amazing artists from around the world to create one-of-a-kind original covers, this time on the blank variant cover editions of Adventure Time #36. The results are here, with stunning art from Jeffrey Brown, John Cassaday, Emi Lenox, Whilce Portacio, Bill Sienkiewicz, Walt Simonson, and more!

The original art from The Adventure Time 100 Project will be auctioned off beginning in on June 2nd, 2018 during a launch party event at Challengers Comics in Chicago, IL and continuing online.

Print copies of The Adventure Time 100 Project will be available for sale in May 2018 at local comic book shops or at the BOOM! Studios webstore. Digital copies can be purchased from content providers, including comiXology, iBooks, Google Play, and the BOOM! Studios app.

Thought Bubble 2017 Anthology to Benefit Children’s Charity Barnardos

Image Comics has announced the Thought Bubble 2017 Anthology #6, which will feature some of the top creators in the industry and will benefit the children’s charity Barnardos. It will be available this September.

The Thought Bubble 2017 Anthology is a collection of new short stories by some of the best in the business for the UK’s Thought Bubble Comic Art Festival, which takes place in Leeds, Northern England from 18th to 24th September 2017.

The anthology will feature work from such creative comics titans as Jason Aaron, Jen Bartel, Cecil Castellucci, Brandon Graham, Jody Houser, Jason Latour, Emi Lenox, Simon Roy, Marley Zarcone, and many more.

hought Bubble 2017 Anthology #6 (Diamond Code JUN178088) will hit stores on Wednesday, September 20th. The final order cutoff deadline for comic shop retailers is this Monday, July 24th.

Review: Black Hammer Giant-Sized Annual

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Illustrated by an all-star slate of guest artists, this oversized anthology issue features five Black Hammer stories from Jeff Lemire, each focusing on one of the stranded heroes. See how Dustin Nguyen, Emi Lenox, Nate Powell, Matt Kindt, and Ray Fawkes take on tales about Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, Colonel Weird, Barbalien, and Madame Dragonfly.

Like the rest of the Black Hammer series, this giant-sized annual combines both past and present with a great mix of stories. Unlike previous issues, the focus in this issue is much broader and event stranger. All of the stories are well told, through shifting artists that’s a who’s who. That shift of artists and style manages to distinguish each miniature tale well yet it all still blends together into one larger narrative.

Each of the six artists chosen brings their own unique style to the mini-story they tell.  Picking one to that stands out above the others is impossible, the talent is so top notch and it’s all so impressive. Rating the art as a collective whole is a challenge as well, due to the shifting styles and artists.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Dustin Nguyen, Emi Lenox, Nate Powell, Matt Kindt, Ray Fawkes
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Black Hammer Gets a the Super Treatment and Giant-Sized Annual

Jeff Lemire’s superhero comic series is getting the super treatment: Dark Horse has announced that Black Hammer will have an oversized anthology issue in early 2017.

Black Hammer Giant-Sized Annual features an all-star slate of guest artists illustrating five stories by Jeff Lemire. Dustin Nguyen, Emi Lenox, Nate Powell, Matt Kindt, Ray Fawkes, and Dave Stewart bring Abraham Slam, Golden Gail, Colonel Weird, Barbalien, and Madame Dragonfly to life.

The forty-page Black Hammer Giant-Sized Annual will be available on January 18, 2017.

Black Hammer is currently available as an ongoing comic series from Dark Horse. The popular series is from the prodigious brain of Lemire and brought to life by Ormston, with colors by none other than Eisner Award–winning veteran Dave Stewart.

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Waypoint Acquires Lemire and Lenox’s Plutona to Bring it to the Big Screen

http://www.jaimehogge.comAnother comic has been acquired and being adapted for the big screen. Waypoint Entertainment has acquired the rights to Jeff Lemire and Emi Lenox‘s Plutona. The series is a coming of age story which centers on a group of kids who find the body of a famous dead superhero in the woods. Waypoint Entertainment’s Ken Kao, will produce with partner Dan Kao and Addictive Pictures’ Russell Ackerman and John Schoenfelder under their first-look deal.

Image Comics released Plutona, a 5-issue limited series, on September 2015 to critical acclaim.

Waypoint Entertainment recently acquired the rights to two Mark Millar properties, American Jesus and Supercrooks, which Ken Kao will produce with partner Dan Kao and Addictive Pictures. They are also in pre-production on the sci-fi thriller Tau, directed by Federico D’ Alessandro and starring Maika Monroe and Ed Skrein.

Plutona

 

Review: Nowhere Men #10

nowheremen_10-1This arc of Nowhere Men has given readers insight on the humans at the heart of the science, leaving flawed but extremely well-developed characters at the center of the story. The creative team, consisting of Eric Stephenson, Dave Taylor, Emi Lenox, and Jordie Bellaire, really manage to keep each issue balanced in terms of both art and story.

This arc has focused on the aftermath of the World Corp disaster, specifically on the scientists involved. However, it has also introduced a number of unknown variables, including Simon Grimshaw and Thomas Walker, as well as the mysterious physical transformations of Susan Queen and Kurt McManus. The story has followed a natural progression that leaves the fate of many characters hanging in the balance as they all come to terms with what has happened. Nowhere Men #10 hints at answers and ends with the biggest cliffhanger of the arc so far.

One of the greatest accomplishments of the series is Stephenson’s ability to write all of the (numerous) characters in a way that doesn’t leave any neglected. They’ve all been developed with distinct personalities, through their interactions with each other (the World Corp crew), the insert advertisements and interviews (the World Corp founders), and the supplementary visual diaries (Monica Strange). This method is particularly effective, as it allows for both character and cultural background within the story without getting too much dialogue and exposition-heavy.

The narrative balance is met with visual balance from Lenox and Taylor. Lenox’s guest artist spots give a voice to Monica Strange, who is developed through her sketch diary entries. In the rest of the issue, Taylor’s art captures the larger-than-life characters perfectly. The panel layout and two-page spreads emphasize characters who appear in the story more infrequently, and boast some impressive visuals. Pages 22-25 are especially noteworthy, with some incredible colors from Jordie Bellaire.

Overall, this is another well done issue from a fantastic creative team. It is both thought-provoking and entertaining, and will make readers glad its publishing break is over.

Story: Eric Stephenson Art: Dave Taylor, Jordie Bellaire, Emi Lenox
Art: 9.5 Story: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Nowhere Men #9

nowheremen09-digital-1For a comic about science, Nowhere Men contains a refreshingly small amount of science. That is to say, writer Eric Stephenson does a consistently great job of making sure the story isn’t bogged down by its subject material. The concept of Nowhere Men is a world in which scientists are given the same pop culture treatment as the Fab Four, and the plot centers on a secret space station where World Corp scientists are studying. The station tumbles to Earth with the added biohazard of an unknown viral infection plaguing the scientists and having unforeseen effects on both scientists and civilians.

As dense as that story could potentially be, Nowhere Men is an accessible comic, which makes it all the more enjoyable. It’s the perfect blend of pop culture and (comic book) science, and though it requires some suspension of disbelief (as most comics do) the homages to the way in which the media treats celebrities and the diverse characters keep it fresh and engaging. Nowhere Men #9 spends a lot of time focusing on the personality and humanity of its characters, rather than their viral mutations, something that is hinted at in the cover. Readers learn more about the surviving scientists’ backgrounds and motivations as scientists, which in turn sheds light on who they are outside of the lab.

While there’s a lot of conversation and exposition happening in this issue, it’s difficult to say how things are otherwise progressing. The pacing is slower in this arc, though it’s not necessarily a bad thing. While the first issues worked to develop a solid profile of each of the four founders of World Corp, the second volume is shaping the newer World Corp recruits into rounded, well-developed characters. Nowhere Men largely offers glimpses of its characters, never focusing on an individual for too long. The discussion in this issue is broken up by short scenes that take place outside of the hospital, as well as another issue of Emi Lenox on Nowhere Men’s meta-comic, The Mixed-Up Adventures of Monica Strange.

Dave Taylor’s art is another constant in the series. His expressions convey extra depth in each character, even in those like Kurt and Susan, who respectively can be described as a cooler-looking Red Hulk and a void that can project thoughts. Taylor is as much a part of the character development as Stephenson as he brings each scientist alive with expressive faces and body language.

While people looking to read Nowhere Men purely for science will be disappointed, the comic continues to be an enjoyable read for its art and themes of humanity. Stephenson builds tension in the waiting, leaving much room to wonder what the endgame will be.

Story: Eric Stephenson Art: Dave Taylor, Emi Lenox, Jordie Bellaire, Fonografiks
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Nowhere Men #8

nowheremen_08-1Nowhere Men #8 is the second issue of the new arc since the series returned in January following a two year hiatus. Eric Stephenson doesn’t waste any time in this issue, forcing the scientists (and the reader) to think about the moral consequences of a secret spaceship crashing and spreading a disease that could kill millions.

As with the previous issue, Nowhere Men #8 opens with a short, four page comic about Monica Strange, drawn by Emi Lenox. This Monica Strange comic is titled “Expectations,” and while it reads as Monica talking about the expectations others seem to have for her, it doesn’t seem to bear much relevance to the story. However, as Monica Strange becomes a larger part of the story (with the emphasis on her introduction and the attention paid to developing her character with miniature comics, she likely will) these interludes will hopefully begin to fall into place within the story.

This issue is light on Simon Grimshaw villainy, instead playing up the conflict within the group of WorldCorp scientists. The main issue is something that has been brewing under the surface since Kurt began his transformation, and that is the divisive physical difference between those who have visibly mutated and those who have more “invisible” powers, so to speak. It will be interesting to see where this takes the story, especially given the fact that nobody knows how far the virus has spread. That, as well as Emerson Strange’s fate, hang in the balance.

Another unknown is Thomas Walker. His appearance at the end of Nowhere Men #7 was brief, and his intentions are anyone’s guess. Very little time progresses during this issue, but reading it is akin to watching puzzle pieces being laid out.

Dave Taylor continues to rock the art, and has created some especially cool sequences during a scene with Dr. Susan Queen. Emi Lenox’s illustrations for the short Monica Strange comics are a standout, and give Monica a depth that rounds out her much more clinical in-story personality.

If the last issue of Nowhere Men felt like the calm before the storm, #8 seemed to ripple the waters a bit, and the comic continues to excite.

Story: Eric Stephenson Art: Dave Taylor and Emi Lenox
Story: 7.9 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review 

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