Author Archives: christopher scott author

Review: Imaginary Fiends #1

“Polly Peachpit.” Those were the words ten-year-old Brinke Calle said when she was found covered in her own blood by the woods in rural Cannon Falls, MN. Her best friend, Melba, had just attempted to murder her because a spider girl named Polly Peachpit told her to.

Since that day, Melba has spent seven years in a mental health facility. Tomorrow is her eighteenth birthday. Tomorrow, she’ll be transferred to a federal prison. Tomorrow, her real sentence will begin.

That is, until she receives a visit from FBI Agent Virgil Crockett. Crockett explains that there is another world beyond ours, where hungry spectral aliens stalk the minds of the impressionable and weak. These things, called IMPs (Interdimensional Mental Parasites) feed on compliance. They convince hosts to do things for them, and the more they feed, the stronger they become. More IMPs stream into the world each day, invisible to everyone but his or her hosts.

After years of drugs and counseling, Polly and Melba have developed a unique relationship—and to Crockett, this relationship represents something her people can work with. In exchange for release from prison, Crockett asks Melba (and Polly) to serve as IMP hunters. For Melba, it’s a chance to prove that she’s innocent, convinced to murder by a monster…a monster she must now unleash.

Writer Tim Seeley creates a paranormal tale with Imaginary Fiends, filled with mystery, interdimensional beings, and murder. Along with the rather creepy beings, we’re also treated to disturbing nursery style rhymes in the process. Seeley does an excellent job of creating the setting and setting up the story to come with its focus on Melba and her situation in a mental hospital until she’s paid a visit and given an offer she can’t refuse.

The art by Stephen Molnar shifts as the settings shift, and things in Melba’s live go from innocence to incarceration. Molnar brings in a lighter, and brighter color scheme in Melba’s youth which contrasts with various shades of grey as she lives in the mental health facility. This shifts again as she moves into her new role. The art sets up the Melba’s mood in a way.

The first issue delivers an interesting set up that mixes together horror with a more traditional detective setting.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Stephen Molnar Cover: Richard Pace
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Grimm Fairy Tales: Dance of the Dead #2

Trapped in the Shadowlands, Mystere and Jasmine must rely on each other to survive while searching for a way to escape back to Earth. But the evil wizard Gruel has other plans for them and that includes suffering at the hands of his newest ally…The Snow Queen.

Nothing in the Shadowlands is exactly what it appears to be inGrimm Fairy Tales: Dance of the Dead #2. Mystere and Jasmine realize they share a common history and some issues as well. That allows them to bond, as the past of the Shadowlands is slowly revealed by writer Anne Toole.

The art by Enn brings in both past and present with unique visuals. There’s a clear distinction between the two with vastly different color schemes helping delineate which is which.

Despsite the two time periods, each moves the plot forward and action as Jasmine and Mystere try to escape the Shadowlands.

Story: Anne Toole Art: Enn
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Robyn Hood: The Hunt #3

Robyn has escaped the prison walls, but is now on the run in the dangerous jungle surrounding it. Hunted by her enemies and the deadly Executioner, she must find her way to freedom, but she will need to survive first.

New Found freedom comes with a price in Robyn Hood: The Hunt #3, as Robyn’s enemies and prison guards are on her tail.  Even the jungle itself seems to be against her, as writer LaToya Morgan throws deadly creatures at her as well. There’s some that are familiar, and some not so much. I’m curious to see how she survives and will she find herself going back the prison in the end?

The art by Daniel Mainé shifts as the environment shifts. Through small details it is revealed the jungle around the prison is just as deadly as the prison itself. The new location brings in a new color palette of greens, blues, black, and browns that suit the jungle.

Story: LaToya Morgan Art: Daniel Mainé
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

 

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Children of the Fall

OVERPOPULATION AND FOSSIL FUEL EXHAUSTION HAVE LED TO HUMANITY’S DEMISE… leaving the world a violent and chaotic shell of its former self. Amidst the turmoil, Lin Shaw, the eldest daughter of a warlord, has retreated with her younger sister, Kay, to a remote island in Southeast Asia. There, they encounter the enigmatic Gunfighter and, together, the trio must face a treacherous landscape and a dangerous adversary in the hopes of securing safe passage to Valhalla — mankind’s last sanctuary. Wayne Young has created a vivid world of a possible future that is as unsettling as it is familiar… a story that asks the question, “When your world is a memory, does what you do still matter?”

Children of the Fall is a quick paced story about mobsters, the apocalypse, and honor. Possessing an odd, almost “western” atmosphere, the story is very straight forward. Writer Wayne T. Young keeps the story focused on the present situation instead of focusing on the ways of the previous world.

The art by Young is polished and well presented. It shows some of the after effects of the apocalypse and how it changed has cities in itself expanding the story and world and allowing the reader to expand the story on their own. There’s also focus on demonstrating the reactions and radical shift in how people act and dress. Again a solid detail that helps flesh out the world.

Story: Wayne T. Young Art: Wayne T. Young
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Arcana Studio provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Robyn Hood: The Hunt #2

Things go from bad to worse for Robyn. Not only is she trapped in a maximum security prison with her deadliest enemies but the Warden has passed his own sentence on her…and his verdict is death.

It seems even surrounded by enemies, Robyn has a few allies in Robyn Hood: The Hunt #2. Writer Joe Brusha reveals who really wants her dead along with revealing that the same people are visiting the next day. This forces Robyn to trust her cellmate, as they plan an escape. That of course means fighting for their lives to do so. Lots of action to come is set up.

The issue increases the number of fight scenes for artist Daniel Maine to have fun with and it all pushes the plot forward. Each fight scene seems to have some purpose and reveals small secrets about Robyn’s imprisonment. Main creates both well-flowing panels along with the needed story telling.

I’m curious to see how things shift in the upcoming issues as the comic moves into the escape portion of things.

Story: Joe Brusha Art: Daniel Maine
Story :8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Amory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #4

Ryder senses an intruder has stolen something from him, and he wants it back.

Things take an interesting turn as the line between reality and fiction continue to blur in The Amory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #4. Written by Chondra Echert and Claudio Sanchez, Ryder is starting to feel a sense of paranoia as his own imagination comes to life. He tries to put his relationship with Erica to an end, if only for its own selfish purposes. Meanwhile, Claudio’s powers seem to become slightly less stable as they formulate an attack on a planet that is half fairy tale, half reality.

The art style by Rags Morales contrasts well as fiction and reality continue to merge some. That manages to enhance the narrative of the unstable nature of Ryder’s mind. Morales gives both the fictional and non-fictional sides of the story a strange sense of balance, especially as the sides switch back and forth as the story progresses.

Story: Chondra Echert, Claudio Sanchez
Art: Rags Morales
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Amory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #3

After a bruising altercation, Inferno dishes the dirt to Claudio about his parents, but will he listen?

The truth of what and who Claudio’s parents were is revealed in The Amory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #3. Written by Chondra Echert and Claudio Sanchez, the issue is even more shocking in how his parent’s past manages to be spread out over his family. The issue manages to reveal some of the reason why he has been on the run his entire life. And if that isn’t enough, the issue also manages to reveal some of Ambellina’s past, and a shocking connection to Claudio’s.

Reality and fiction continue to merge in the art style of Rags Morales. This issue blurs the line as the sides collide. The spotlight for this issue, at least for me, is near the end of the issue which is best to experienced. Morales does a superb job of showcasing Claudio’s regret and grief at the actions of his younger self.

Story: Chondra Echert, Claudio Sanchez Art: Rags Morales
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Amory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #2

495412-_sx360_ql80_ttd_

Ambellina and Chase are convinced that Claudio is The Crowing, but how can one simply accept that his fate is to destroy all things?

A lot is revealed in writers Chondra Echert and Claudio Sanchez‘s Armory Wars: Good Apollo I’m Burning Star IV #2. Even with those reveals there’s so many things seem yet to be. It is becoming much more apparent Ryder’s grip on reality is slipping. That leads to a blurring of reality and fiction into one strange menagerie.

The art by Rags Morales continues its odd sense of sci-fi realism. At times the art blurs between a sci-fi and realistic style to fit the story in a strange almost brilliant way. But that halso makes the art stand out as the borders between the two melt away to create a visual treat that sucks the reader in.

Story: Chondra Echert, Claudio Sanchez
Art: Rags Morales

Story: 8.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a copy for review

Review: Grimm Fairy Tales: Dance of the Dead #1

The Shadowlands are a dark and mysterious place, filled with the most evil creatures that have ever haunted mankind’s imagination. Now Mary Medina finds her trapped there with no means of an escape, lured by a powerful enemy, into a dance with the dead.

Sometimes the path less taken has a reason no one takes it. Grimm Fairy Tales: Dance of the Dead #1 takes that idea and runs with it. There’s a great darkness as the debut issue reveals the Egyptian past of Mary Medina. The issue also reveals a little of the history of Jasmine. It all makes me wonder if they are different sides of the same coin and somehow split by the Shadowlands.

The art by Enn and Ario Murti features contrasting color palettes which stands out. The artists distinguish the few settings with ease putting the emphasis on either dark or bright colors.

Story: Anne Toole Art: Enn, Ario Murti
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Zenescope provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Gwar Orgasmageddon #4

GWAR04-COV-A-SAWYER-NOTFINAL

Join GWAR, SAWBORG and BOZO (the DESTRUCTO brothers), SEXECUTIONER, and ROBO-SLEAZY as they finish their quest to get back to the present, fix the future, and kick Mr. Perfect’s stupid butt all over the timescape! The final issue has dinosaurs, samurai, nazis, penguins, robots, 30s gangsters, robots, robot penguins, crack dealers, grindhouse movies, and not only that but it reveals GWAR’s new look! That’s right folks: GWAR’S NEW COSTUMES AND THEIR ORIGIN right here! This explosive final issue wraps the craziest fever dream ride in 2017’s comics. Join GWAR and creators in the finale to this ridiculously bonkers chapter of Scumdog Lore!T

The clash of humor and violence continues in this final issue written by Matt Miner and Matt Maguire. With a serious amount of time jumps, as Gwar mangles history, the issue brings things to a mixed ending as Gwar teams up with its enemies, to fight Mr. Perfect. But, that’s not all as the issue also gives us some more short tales at the end.

The art by Tom Neely and Matt Maguire is action packed in this issues. The two have no problem making visual puns at history with appearances by Abraham Lincoln, Donald Trump, and more. That’s in addition to packing in a serious amount of gore and violence (but that’s what we’d expect). Can’t also forget a shoutout to some mutant looking penguins.

Writer: Matt Miner, Matt Maguire Art: Tom Neely, Matt Maguire
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dynamite Entertainment provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

« Older Entries