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Fantastic Four, Giant-Size Marvel, Hercules, and More are New on comiXology

There’s eight new releases available now on comiXology. You can get new comics from Marvel, Harlequin, and Tidalwave Productions. Get shopping now or check out the individual issues below.

Fantastic Four: Clobberin’ Time

Written by Todd DeZago
Art by Michael O’Hare
Cover by Randy Green
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Collects Marvel Age: Fantastic Four Tales #1, Tales Of The Thing #1-3 And Spider-Man Team-Up Special (2005) #1. Check out the Thing and the rest of his Fantastic Four pals in their latest collection of all-ages adventures! Each of these four action-packed stories features a special guest from the Mighty Marvel Universe. Join the Black Panther, Dr. Strange and other heroes as they combine forces with the Thing for this contemporary spin on classic Marvel tales.

Fantastic Four: Clobberin' Time

Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules

Written by James Sturm
Art by Guy Davis, James Sturm
Cover by Craig Thompson
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Collects Startling Stories: Fantastic Four – Unstable Molecules #1-4. In 1961 the first issue of THE FANTASTIC FOUR was drawn and written by the brilliant team of Jack Kirby and Stan Lee and set a new standard for heroic adventure comics. Few people realize that the Fantastic Four — a family of sci-fi adventurers gifted with amazing powers — were actually based on the lives of real people. As often is the case, real life was as astonishing as fiction. UNSTABLE MOLECULES is a biography that revisits the Fantastic Four’s beginnings with a historian’s eye.

Fantastic Four: Unstable Molecules

Giant-Size Marvel

Written by Gerry Conway, Steve Gerber, Tony Isabella, Donald McGregor, Roger Slifer, Roy Thomas, Len Wein
Art by Rich Buckler, John Buscema, Dave Cockrum, Don Heck, Gil Kane, Don Perlin, Frank Robbins
Cover by John Romita Sr.
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Collects Giant-Size Fantastic Four #4; Giant-Size Avengers #1; Giant-Size Defenders #4; Giant-Size Super-Heroes #1, Giant-Size Invaders #1; Giant-Size X-Men #1, Giant-Size Creatures #1. Giants roamed the Earth in those days, and now they’re back! Witness the formation of the new X-Men and the old Invaders! The rapid return of the wartime runner called the Whizzer! The debut of the multiplying Marvel Knight Madrox! Spider-Man vs. the Man-Wolf! The Defenders vs. the Squadron Sinister! The tantalizing Tigra and more! Tales almost too tall to tell, together in a titanic tome!

Giant-Size Marvel

Hercules: The New Labors Of Hercules

Written by Frank Tieri
Art by Mark Texeira
Cover by Mark Texeira
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Collects Hercules (2005) #1-5. Reeling from the tragic death of Thor, the Prince of Power knows his star is fading fast. So what better way to pump up his Q-rating than to relive his defining moment? When his most bitter foe throws down the gauntlet, Hercules agrees to the challenge: twelve labors, each more perilous than the one before it — and each updated for reality-TV consumption. Zounds!

Hercules: The New Labors Of Hercules

Partenaire en amour

Written by Jessica Hart
Art by Marito Ai
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Darcy a fait le voyage depuis Londres pour visiter Bindaburra Ranch, une propriété que lui a léguée son grand-oncle. Sur sa route vers le ranch, sa voiture tombe en panne et elle se voit contrainte de continuer à pied sur ses talons dans une campagne qu’elle ne connaît pas. Juste au moment où elle commençait à désespérer, un homme nommé Cooper arrive dans sa voiture et la sauve. Mais Cooper déclare qu’il est le propriétaire de Bindaburra. Cooper essayait-il de profiter du décès de son grand-oncle pour accaparer le ranch que son oncle aimait tant ?

Partenaire en amour

Un mariage par nécessité

Written by Christine Rimmer
Art by Kuremi Hazama
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Le père de Megan avait stipulé dans son testament qu’elle devait se marier dans les deux ans et avoir un enfant, sous peine de perdre la propriété de la ferme d’élevage. Désormais, elle doit trouver un mari, au plus vite ! Pour cela, elle se bat pour rencontrer son ami d’enfance Nathan Bravo. Alors qu’ils ont grandi ensemble, il a quitté la ville il y a longtemps pour y pratiquer la médecine vétérinaire. À présent, douze ans plus tard, Megan est décidée à lui demander de l’épouser !

Un mariage par nécessité

Welcome to Waterbury #2

Written by Dan Rafter
Art by Byron L. Golden
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Chapter 2: The Devil You Know. Living in Waterbury in an aging inn wasn’t Audrey’s dream. It was her husbands. But now her husband is dead, and Audrey is the only one who thinks it wasn’t an accident. She’s also the only one who thinks the scarecrows scattered throughout the town have been moving. What’s really going on in Waterbury? Audrey’s about to find out.

Welcome to Waterbury #2

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Earth’s Mightiest Heroes: An Avengers Retrospective Part 3: In Battle Joined (Issues #36-56)

Avengers (1963) #36

Guest contributor Eugene Selassie is back with the second part of his retrospective of Marvel‘s The Avengers. He started at the beginning covering the first sixteen issues. He’s back discussing issues #36 to #56!


In this third installment of my deep dive, reading every single issue of The Avengers from the beginning, what we know as staples of Avengers lore are introduced in these issues. Some of these staples greatly enhance the reading experience, while others detracted more than I remembered them to. Legendary writer and artist team of Roy Thomas and John Buscema begin their iconic run on the title. Many new heroes, that would go on to become perennial mainstays of the roster, make their first appearance in the book during these issues. Past relationships and connections come back to haunt a few of the protagonists. Story elements that played out in classic Avengers stories decades later are seeded in these issues. Continuity becomes a double-edged sword during this run, potentially splitting the audience into “love it” or “hate it” camps.

Roy Thomas took over as writer with issue #36. With the constant in-fighting (now between Goliath and Hawkeye over Clint’s insistence that Black Widow be granted membership status) and the hyperbole used in the narration (ex: “Thus it is that, less than sixty seconds later, twin engines of a highly complex design burst into ear-shattering life and zoom with blinding, supersonic speed into the sub-stratosphere, as all passengers fervently hope they will not be too late!”) meant that the transition in scripting from Stan Lee to Roy Thomas was as smooth as possible. Issue #41 heralded the debut of the legendary John Buscema as penciler. His layouts were a bit splashier than what we’ve previously seen. Nevertheless, with George Bell remaining as the inker, making the characters look roughly the same, the transition from Don Heck to John Buscema was not too jarring. Fill in issues by Don Heck were still welcome, as was a one-off by George Tuska, whose level of intricate detail was only rivaled years later by George Perez.

Avengers (1963) #38

I waited with bated breath to see new members, one by one, added to the ranks of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes:

  • Black Widow accompanies the team, in issues #36-37, to rescue Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver from an alien threat, the Ultroids, near their village in the Balkans. Natasha turns out to be the ace up the heroes’ sleeve that they desperately needed. The Avengers, sticking to their moral code, prevented them from doing what was necessary to defeat Ixar. On the contrary, Black Widow had no such compunctions. Days after this adventure, as Widow rushes to Avengers mansion for a meeting to discuss her membership, she is abducted. However, it is not by enemies. Nick Fury, Director of SHIELD recruits her for a secret mission overseas, a mission that must remain secret from even Hawkeye and the other Avengers. When Widow recovers in the hospital after this mission and explains how the government lied about her husband’s death and duped her into training (even though they did the same thing to him), there was no mention of the infamous “Red Room” training that we know in the modern age.
  • Hercules makes his Avengers debut in issue #38. The Prince of Power is locked in combat against the God of War, Ares, due to events from Thor issue #129. The Enchantress shows up to convince them to squash their beef and offers alcoholic beverages to both. In reality, she’s working with Ares. Hercules’ drink is spiked with a love potion, making him do Amora’s bidding. Ares gets to tell Zeus of this forbidden passion, making Hercules a pariah in Olympus, while Enchantress gets to use her unwitting slave against the Avengers. During their fight, the potion wears off and Hercules helps the team fend off the Asgardian and Olympian. Due to the perceived forbidden affair, Hercules is then banished from his home in Olympus. The Avengers take him in as less of a member and more of a house guest who helps them whenever he deems fit.
  • Edwin Jarvis, the butler of the Stark family and for the Avengers, makes his first Avengers appearance in issue #38. He’s not given much of a personality until further down the road in issue #54, where he hides a deadly secret from the Avengers; he’s sold the new mansion security specs to the Crimson Cowl in exchange for a large sum of money he desperately needed. Cowl, of course, reneges on the deal.
  • The Sub-Mariner returns in issue #40. A nuclear sub tests weapons near his kingdom, which Namor doesn’t take too kindly to. He attacks the island base from where it came from, only to encounter the Avengers. Page 15…Hercules vs. Namor…HOLY $#I^! These two beat the stuffing out of each other. I am surprised that there wasn’t a giant crater left in their wake.
  • Dane Whitman, nephew of Nathan Garrett, the villainous Black Knight, debuts in issue #47. Garrett met his end against Iron Man in Tales of Suspense #73. Dane seeks to atone for his uncle’s evil actions and decides to use the science and nom de guerre of his uncle, to do good with it as the new Black Knight. He seeks out the Avengers for an alliance. Conversely, they mistake him for his uncle and get into a brawl.
  • Black Panther makes a cameo, alongside Captain America (who quit the team several issues earlier) in issue #51, where Steve requests they consider T’Challa for membership. Issue #52 features the Black Panther entering Avengers mansion for the first time, in a story where he finds what appear to be the bodies of Hank, Jan, and Clint. He’s arrested by SHIELD agent Jasper Sitwell and is hauled off into police custody. I don’t know if Roy Thomas understood how tone-deaf it was to see the imagery of the first Black superhero to be featured in the Avengers comic being shackled in the back of a squad car. Of course, T’Challa escapes so he can investigate what occurred.
Avengers (1963) #47

Several extended relationships are given more space to develop in these issues.

  • Issue #43 is the first appearance of the Soviet super-soldier known as Red Guardian, who happens to be the Black Widow’s ex-husband. When Clint finds out, he grows cold and emotionless for the first time in this series. This is the second time a villain is brought into the book that Hawkeye has an obvious grudge with, but their sole motive is to prove they can best Captain America, making the rest of the Avengers look “lesser than”.
  • Concurrent with this story is the arc of Tales of Suspense where Steve meets and falls for SHIELD Agent 13, aka Sharon Carter. It’s also where he’s contemplating giving up being Captain America, which didn’t quite sit well with me. I know Marvel was all about heroes with feet of clay, especially back then, but this was akin to Clark Kent no longer wanting to be Superman. I had no clue that Steve was a fan of Tolkien or fantasy novels in general, so it was cool to see that side of him.
  • Hercules travels to Olympus to beseech his father, Zeus, to reconsider his exile. However, the Prince of Power finds the fabled land completely deserted.  In issue #49, Hercules discovers that it is the dreaded ancient Titan known as Typhon who was responsible for what happened to the Olympians. By destroying the sacred Temple of the Promethean Flame, the immortals of Olympus just vanished. After confronting the Titan, Hercules finds himself banished to the same limbo that his people were banished to. Issue #50 sees Hank, Jan, and Clint search for Hercules, who has reunited with the Olympians. Zeus is able to send him back to Earth due to the magic holding them there not having as strong of a hold on the Prince of Power because he’s half-mortal. The team does their best to slow down Typhon, but the dude is a ten-foot-tall demigod with a battle axe that shoots lightning. Once Hercules arrives, he and Typhon have the grudge match of the ages. Whatever unidentified landmass in the Mediterranean where they brawled had to have been reduced by half. In the end, Hercules defeated him using not just brawn, but tactics taught by Captain America. He returns with Typhon to Olympus, bidding farewell to the Avengers for the time being. This leaves the roster to just Hank, Jan, and Clint…not the most powerhouse line up they’ve had.
  • Issues #47-49 feature Magneto, who was exiled to a planetoid far from the Earth in X-Men #18. This is indubitably pre-Chris Claremont Magneto. He’s not a sympathetic Holocaust survivor trying to prevent the same thing from happening to mutant kind. He is cranky, megalomaniacal, and vengeful. And he is quite abusive to his lackey, Toad. I completely forgot that neither Magneto nor Quicksilver & Scarlet Witch knew they were related in those early years. Magneto demands the UN for his own nation for mutants. When they refuse and he lashes out at one of the representatives with a microphone as a weapon, Hawkeye saves him, and the most fun, yet clunky, dialogue followed; “A diamond-tipped arrow…from out of nowhere…smashing the microphone. But who?” I love superhero comics. Hawkeye landing a kick right to Magneto’s face made me think that this is likely the only time that has ever happened.  The crux of Magneto’s plan was to cause one of the guard’s aim to go off wildly and accidentally shoot Wanda in the head (grazing her temple) just so it would send Pietro into a rage against the guards and the Avengers. Yeah, the “Magneto was right” crowd may want to tone it down a bit after this.

I found myself enthralled by the number of story elements that were just the nugget of an idea that played out on a larger scale some years, even decades later:

  • Long before the Kree-Skrull War, you could tell that both Stan Lee and Roy Thomas had the idea percolating, of a war between two alien empires with Earth caught in the middle. The Ultroids made the second time that something like this was hinted at.
  • Magneto blackmailing the United Nations into giving him his own nation was something done three decades later in an X-men storyline titled “The Magneto War”.
  • Issues 54-55 bring us a new Masters of Evil, comprised of the Klaw, the Melter, Radioactive Man, Whirlwind and the new Black Knight. They’re all working for the mysterious Crimson Cowl. However, they don’t know that this Black Knight is not Nathan Garrett, but his nephew, Dane Whitman. Dane goes undercover with the group to gather intel that he can bring to the Avengers. The mission of this new incarnation of the villain group, to storm Avengers mansion and capture the team. I never knew the Masters of Evil attacked the Avengers in their home, long before the classic Siege of Avengers Mansion during Roger Stern’s run.

I am a person that loves continuity, when used the right way. When Thor or Iron Man have to leave the team due to events in their own book that month, I loved it. Realistically, the characters cannot be everywhere all the time. That era was much better with not having characters guest starring in six different books the same month “just because”. However, when a character pops into a book, carrying over from a story in another book, it gets a bit frustrating keeping up with. While the Hercules story carrying over from The Mighty Thor was explained thoroughly, Nick Fury’s subplot from Strange Tales, where he’s essentially on house arrest, Cap leaving the team due to being duped in Tales of Suspense by Swordsman and Power Man into believing Bucky was still alive, and the most egregious one, the X-men versus Magneto fight that carried over into an Avengers comic, were not given the necessary flashbacks to really flesh out these elements. In the case of the X-men one, it would’ve helped tremendously if they just made it an actual crossover with the parts 1 and 2 posted on the covers of those respective issues.

My apologies for the gargantuan length of this post, in the future, I will do my best to make sure the articles aren’t covering twenty issues worth of content. Speaking of content, when we reconvene again, we discuss several debuts (Vision, Yellowjacket, and a guest appearance by Doctor Strange) along with trips into the sci-fi, the cosmic, and even the occult. Until next time, AVENGERS ASSEMBLE!

Travel to August 1961 with Marvel

In August 1961, Fantastic Four #1 hit newsstands, heralding a new take on super hero stories and the birth of the Silver Age Marvel Universe! Now, sixty years later, experience the excitement of being a comic book fan in that momentous month with the Marvel: August 1961 Omnibus, a complete hardcover collection of every issue that shared the shelves with Fantastic Four #1, many never before reprinted!

Considering leaving the comic book industry behind, Stan Lee was persuaded by his loving wife Joan to create one more book exactly the way he wanted it. And so, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created Fantastic Four #1 and changed the American pop culture landscape forever. Before the Silver Age kicked off, Marvel Comics had published western, romance, comedy, monster and science fiction titles — and in August 1961, Fantastic Four was just one of over a dozen very different Marvel books. This first-of-its-kind omnibus will include:

  • JOURNEY INTO MYSTERY (1952) #73-74
  • KATHY #13
  • LIFE WITH MILLIE #13
  • PATSY WALKER #97
  • AMAZING ADVENTURES (1961) #6
  • FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #1
  • KID COLT, OUTLAW #101
  • LINDA CARTER, STUDENT NURSE #2
  • MILLIE THE MODEL #105
  • STRANGE TALES (1951) #90
  • TALES OF SUSPENSE (1959) #23
  • TALES TO ASTONISH (1959) #25
  • GUNSMOKE WESTERN #67
  • LOVE ROMANCES #96
  • TEEN-AGE ROMANCE #84
  • AMAZING ADULT FANTASY #7
  • PATSY AND HEDY #79
  • RAWHIDE KID (1960) #25

These works were brought to readers by some of the most influential comic book creators of all time including Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, Stan Goldberg, Al Hartley, Paul Reinman, Jack Keller, Dick Ayers, Bob Forgione, Vince Colletta, and more!

Check out the all-new cover by Javier Rodriguez as well as the exclusive Direct Market variant cover by Jack Kirby and be sure to pick up this rare and unique collection when the Marvel: August 1961 Omnibus hits shops in August 2021!

Earth’s Mightiest Heroes: An Avengers Retrospective Part 2: Four Against…(Issues #17-35)

The Avengers #17

Guest contributor Eugene Selassie is back with the second part of his retrospective of Marvel‘s The Avengers. He started at the beginning covering the first sixteen issues. He’s back discussing issues #17 to #35!


We continue my biweekly recap of my deep dive, reading every single issue of The Avengers from the beginning. In the second half of the Stan Lee era of the book, we see more of a focus on the personalities and the private concerns of each Avenger. We also notice a shift in the power levels of the villains they face to complement the more grounded roster. The political thriller vibe of some of the arcs, predating The Ultimates by about 35 years, was welcome…but the racial caricatures were not. Several allies and Avengers mainstays debuted around this time. Finally, these issues really hit home how much a different inker can completely change an art style.

The first few issues of the “kooky quartet” era established the dynamics of the team rather quickly:

  • Captain America was now unquestionably the one in charge. Steve Rogers exuded even more confidence in action than in previous Avengers stories, if that’s even possible. Complex team strategy and tactics are now on full display with this roster, which was a treat. On the contrary, Cap’s constant brooding while alone at the mansion sometimes felt a bit off-putting. So did the fact that he took on a mission that could’ve caused an international incident, just to look good for SHIELD recruitment (issue 18). When Steve quit the team at the end of issue 22, it could have led to the end of the Avengers, if not for Kang’s subsequent attack, which brought the team back together. Cap was a bit of a dick at times. It felt justified when he was dishing it back out to Hawkeye. Conversely, demanding that Hank Pym prove he’s the real Giant-Man, even though Hank explained that there have been health concerns and the strain of changing size could kill him, went a bit overboard. Equally perplexing was insulting Hank to snap him out of his funk, but from what I’m discovering, that was a common storytelling device at Marvel during the Silver age.
  • Hawkeye was the wild card of the bunch. The action man archer trying to repent from Tales of Suspense #57 up through Avengers #16 is gone and the cocky Clint Barton that we all know and love is present. I laughed heartily because Clint’s luggage wasn’t even unpacked yet before he started mouthing off to Cap. Around issue 25 is where we start to see Clint at least being self-aware that he’s a jerk and gives Cap too much crap…yet he does nothing to actually correct this. He and Cap bickered like an old married couple.
  • While the Scarlet Witch was written not as ineffectively as Jan was in these early issues, Wanda Maximoff is still treated the way all women were written in that era. She pined for Steve 50% of the time. Also, her being a brunette back then really threw me for a loop. Her powers were not as dangerously unpredictable as they would later be written as.
  • Quicksilver’s personality is the furthest from modern renditions. Pietro Maximoff is not quite a pompous ass yet. The one trait that does carry over to modern times is him being overprotective of his sister, Wanda. His personality, for the most part, is just him shouting “don’t talk to my sister that way!”. One minor facet that I never knew existed was both Maximoffs having a fondness for show business. Pietro, especially, took a liking to daredevils and high wire acts in the circus. In battle, he was quite effective, although he used the “tie people up in cloaks/curtains/blankets shtick as his offense…a lot.

While the team still took on “foes that no single hero could withstand” in several of these stories, there was a noticeable pulling back of the power levels of foes to coincide with the lesser powered roster.

  • The Swordsman appears in issues 19-20. This is where we get our first glimpses into Hawkeye’s past as Swordsman’s protégé and Clint getting pulled into a life of crime due to his mentor’s actions
  • Power Man (Erik Josten) in issues 21-22 makes three times (along with Wonder Man and Swordsman) in less than two years that the “villain pretending to be a hero” shtick was used against the Avengers.
  • The Keeper of the Flame (issue #31) was a change of pace in that we hadn’t seen any sort of cult leader in the book as of yet. Their eternal flame was powered by cobalt. Cobalt is treated like plutonium in this issue in that they treated it like it could destroy the entire planet. The Avengers figured both sides of this ancient conflict over ownership of the flame pose equal danger to the globe, so they snuffed out the flame. This felt like the “ending of Rocky IV” level of tone-deaf in the slightest and “violating the Prime Directive” at the worst.
  • In issue 32, the hate group, known as the Sons of the Serpent, shows up and viciously attacks a random Latinx bystander. One would think that the concept would feel dated…the last few years have proven that, sadly, they’re still relevant.
The Swordsman The Avengers #19

This period also is the starting point for several familiar faces in the annals of Avengers history, to make their appearance. It was good to see Hank Pym and Janet Van Dyne again (issues 26-28). Hank now refers to himself as Goliath. A fun fact I never knew is that Wanda designed and created his blue and yellow Goliath costume. Jan seemed much less flighty, but within the span of six issues she was captured and imprisoned three times, then is knocked out cold after falling out of a tree, ugggh. Hank’s size-changing has caused health concerns and at one point, he gets stuck at ten feet tall, with no way to shrink or grow without fatal results. To assist him in research towards a cure, Tony Stark refers him to one of the most brilliant bio-chemists on the planet, Bill Foster, who would one day become Goliath. Foster was attacked just down the block from Pym’s house by the Serpents in issue 32. Pym went into a full-on rage and canceled all experiments so he could make sure the Avengers made the Serpents a top priority. Not saying there’s anything wrong with Pym, more so than any of the other Avengers, taking umbrage with racially motivated hate crimes and wanting to plant his foot up the asses of those responsible, but I was surprised how “woke” he was. To get more intel on the Serpents, Steve reached out to Nick Fury. Having not read anything with the O.G. Fury in almost a decade I realized how much I missed him. This also marked his first appearance in an Avengers comic. Of course a barber shop is a front for a SHIELD base. This felt oddly on point for a 60s spy organization. Unbeknownst to the Serpents, one of their recruitment meetings has been infiltrated by the Black Widow. It would seem that her road to redemption began here. What also began here was an unsavory pattern.

Issue 18 saw the team go toe-to-toe with the mammoth cyborg dictator known as the Commissar…a bad East Asian stereotype. Issues 32 and 33 revealed that the mastermind behind the Sons of the Serpent was actually a Communist General…who was a bad East Asian stereotype. Issues 34 and 35 revealed that Living Laser had hired himself out to those looking to stage a coup in the fake Latin American country of Costa Verde. Guess what, they were bad Mexican stereotypes. I had to facepalm at a lot of this. I’m hoping that there’s not too much more casual racism masked as patriotism in these early years because that will severely hamper my reading experience.

One thing that stood out more than anything was the different inkers that worked with artist Don Heck. In all of my years of reading comics, I’ve never seen an art style change so drastically with the changing of an inker on a book, until now. The legendary Wally Wood brought a level of intricate detail to the layouts yet unseen during Heck’s run. Shifting to John Romita inks was fun as he was a master of highlighting the character’s acting and emotion. Frankie Ray’s inks were not as detailed as Wally Wood’s but still got the point of Heck’s pencils across, which were probably in their purest form here. The style then drastically shifted when Frank Giacoia did the inks, giving the book an almost “romance comic” vibe. All of these craftsmen were highly talented. I just never knew an inker alone could change the look of a comic to this degree.

I’m very excited to get to the next leg of this journey, the Roy Thomas era of the book. It’s here where new members of the team begin coming in fast and furiously. Hope you’ll return for the coming of Hercules, Black Panther and several others. Until next time, AVENGERS ASSEMBLE!

Earth’s Mightiest Heroes: An Avengers Retrospective Part 1: The Coming of The Avengers (Issues #1-16)

Avengers #8

After an introduction, guest columnist Gene Selassie dives into classic Avengers comics starting from the beginning!


This article kicks off what will be a biweekly recap of my deep dive, reading every single issue of The Avengers from the beginning. These earliest issues of the series highlight the unique personalities, which would differ greatly to how they were written in the modern age. They also lay the groundwork for the types of stories and level of threats the Avengers will become known to face. Additionally, while continuity gaffes and quirky story elements aren’t what I would call ‘plentiful’, there are enough of them that they become noticeable at a certain point. Finally, even though Jack Kirby and Don Heck were both exceptional artists, each brought a unique skill set to the book. Let’s take look at the opening stretch of this journey.

One of the first things that I noticed is that the character development was kept to a minimum in these early issues. I can only surmise that, not unlike the formula that modern writers would use (ex: Grant Morrison on his critically acclaimed JLA run), the fact that all of the characters were featured in solo adventures elsewhere meant that other books were where we got the character development. This team book is for the larger than life threats that no single hero could withstand.

During this run of the “founders”, the characters kept their secret identities to themselves, which made sense since there wasn’t sufficient time for them to forge bonds and trust to that degree.

  • Iron Man functions like technical support since he’s known as just an “employee” of Tony Stark at this point. At times, we get the impression that he is the team leader. In reality, each member gets the spotlight as ‘chairperson’ and is essentially in command that given month. The most we get out of him, from a personality standpoint, is the constant mention of his transistor/repulsor tech issues and that if he runs out of power, the shrapnel lodged near his heart will kill him.
  • Thor is the magic-based muscle of the team. Since his alter ego of physician Doctor Don Blake is still in play at this time, there’s not that much of a “stranger in a strange land” vibe to him. His speech patterns haven’t ventured into the Shakespearean as of yet. Much like Iron Man, Thor was primarily defined by the fact that, if he was separated from his hammer for more than sixty seconds, he’d revert back to Don Blake.
  • The Hulk was more of a surly and cranky giant, ready to fight at the drop of a hat than a monster with the mind of a child that he later became most known for. Whatever triggered Bruce Banner’s transformation into the emerald behemoth at this time was not explained. He also didn’t disappear after issue 3 as many would believe. Hulk was more of a presence throughout that first year of the book than I remembered.
  • Ant-Man/Giant Man was the resident super-scientist. He also felt like a two-fisted pulp action hero back in these early years. This dichotomy may have been just happenstance. Or, it could have been an early seed of Hank Pym’s mental illness.
  • Wasp was “the woman” of any early Marvel comic, as we also see with the Enchantress and the Scarlet Witch later on. Janet Van Dyne never gets much deeper than “attraction to male compatriot” and “likes to have fun”. She wasn’t given much to do and had to be rescued often. That being said, there were times of ingenuity on the fly that would be the core of her much stronger characterization later on (during Roger Stern’s run).
  • Rick Jones is every teen sidekick of the era. He doesn’t show much personality, but he has unwavering loyalty to the Hulk (to whom he’s indebted for saving his life) and later Captain America. While his Teen Brigade can come off as hokey, because they avoided many of the modern clichés of teen angst/ineptitude/etc, they came across as competent and welcome allies of the Avengers.
  • Captain America is the one man without crazy superpowers. In spite of this, Steve Rogers never hesitated to leap into battle to protect his fellow teammates or the world. He was a bit happier to jump into a fight than I recollected. Fans who started reading in the 80s-90s or who met Steve through the Marvel Cinematic Universe would be a tad befuddled. His depression over Bucky’s death (still fresh in his mind due to it happening right before he went on ice), without a doubt, was the catalyst. I don’t use the word “trauma” lightly. This guy goes into murder rage whenever Zemo (the one responsible for Bucky’s death) is involved. A perplexing trait of Steve’s is his vacillating from overprotective to complete jerk when it comes to Rick Jones.

Strategy and team tactics were sprinkled in every now and then. The teamwork really began to shine in the latter Masters of Evil issues (9, 15-16) and Cap’s dialogue felt truer than ever in one poignant scene; Captain America: “Feel my grip, Zemo. It’s the grip of a FREE MAN! Look into my eyes, tyrant. They’re the eyes of a man who would die for liberty! The world must never again make the fatal error of mistaking compassion for weakness and while I live, it won’t!”. “Avengers Assemble” being shouted for the first time in issue 10 by the God of Thunder was awesome. Issue 12 was where we started truly seeing the dramatic tension between team members as Hank’s warnings about something being amiss underground were dismissed (the threat turned out to be the Mole Man). The seeds of potential mistrust of the power the team has were planted in issue 13. Count Nefaria, while holding the real Avengers captive, sent hard light projected duplicate Avengers to a meeting at the Pentagon, where they ordered a full surrender of the government. Of course, the real Avengers had to deal with the fallout from this. I had no idea that the team took on the United States military that early in their run. The culmination of the battle saw an Avenger get mortally wounded by a stray bullet. I was left flabbergasted at the end of that story.

Albeit, the innate charisma of each of these characters hadn’t come into play as of yet, they provided plenty of thrills as they took on some of the toughest villains from around the Marvel Universe. I’ve heard it be stated that the Avengers never faced larger than life “widescreen” threats until the era of The Ultimates/New Avengers. That couldn’t be further from the truth as the first year and a half saw the team do battle against an Asgardian god, an alien that could take the form of whatever Avenger he wished, and pitted the team against each other in brawls that swept across New York, a Hulk/Namor team up, an Atlantean incursion, a unified front featuring the arch-nemesis of each of the Avengers, a warlord from the future, and so on and so forth. This book doesn’t get the credit it deserves for really placing them against “foes that no single superhero could withstand” from the very beginning. A few things of note as far as the villains were concerned:

  • Seeing the Hulk and Namor’s alliance (issue 3) and waiting for one to betray the other was hysterical.
  • Even in his first appearance in 1964, Kang the Conqueror, one of my favorite villains, went beast mode on the Avengers (issue 8).
  • Zemo and the Masters of Evil’s presence loomed heavily over the first year’s worth of stories.
  • As ridiculous as some of the early adventures were, there was also some sound logic. Count Nefaria (issue 13) never physically assaulted someone himself and always pulled strings from behind the scenes, trying his damndest to make sure that it was much more difficult to directly connect his crimes to him.
  • Issues 15-16 unquestionably felt like a “season finale”, with a final showdown against the Masters of Evil and Heinrich Zemo’s fate at the hands of Captain America.

On the one hand, the quirks of the writing made for an exciting read. On the other hand, said surprises led to some funny and sometimes head-scratching moments. While testing the newfound super strength and invulnerability of the reluctant villain, Wonder Man (issue 9), the Executioner, an Asgardian god, took out a revolver to shoot him.  Hank Pym often had a sixth sense referred to as his “cybernetic sense” and I’m still waiting for an explanation of what that is. I’ve never seen the word “whirling” used in a comic as often as it is in these early issues (Thor’s whirling hammer, Cap’s whirling shield, Iron Man using his repulsors to place opponents in a perpetual “whirling” state). The most baffling aspect during that first year and a half was the handling of the Asgardians and their abilities. Thor’s powers and power levels would change at the drop of a hat. He’d walk away from being submerged in lava by the Lava Men (issue 5) without so much as a scratch, only for him to nearly get taken down by a stun beam from the Black Knight in the very next issue. His hammer, Mjolnir, can manipulate magnetic fields and at one point was even used as an alien detector (issue 14). The Enchantress showed a power that I didn’t even know she had…TIME TRAVEL. Furthermore, the plethora of “a product of its time” elements in these issues can be a bit much for younger readers not used to them. Women in these stories only cared about makeup and going out on the town. Natives of foreign non-white countries were subservient and unintelligent. Even random bits of dialogue could be cringe at times. Cap, along with Rick Jones, were trapped in the Amazon and Steve randomly shouts “A White Man—being attacked by a leopard! Too far for me to reach him in time!”

The visuals went through quite a metamorphosis midway through this era of the founders. The book started with “The King”, Jack Kirby, whose detailed layouts were made to not just be read, but absorbed. Then, along came Don Heck, who was less renowned for his detailed backgrounds and more known for his far above average character acting. The art change made for a hell of a transition between issues 8 and 9. Both had their strengths and weaknesses. Be that as it may, both crafted insanely entertaining visuals.

Overall, I feel like Steve Rogers did at the end of issue 16; a bit later to the party than those who were around from the very beginning, nevertheless, experienced enough to tackle the challenges that a new team brings. That new team (Cap, Hawkeye, Scarlet Witch, and Quicksilver) will be the focus of part two of this Avengers retrospective. Until next time, AVENGERS ASSEMBLE!

ComiXology has 9 New Digital Comics from DC, Marvel, and Harlequin

ComiXology has a nice mix of new, old, and manga in today’s digital comics releases on the platform. There’s a total of nine new digital comics available now for purchase. You can get them all right now or check out the individual issues below.

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #13

Written by Alan Burnett, Paul Dini
Pencils Ty Templeton
Inks Ty Templeton
Colored by Monica Kubina
Cover by Becky Cloonan
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The Joker turns to a familiar face as he looks to take down the Red Hood. Can Batman track down his former partner before the Clown Prince of Crime strikes, or is this just what Jason wants?

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #13

Champions Classic Vol. 1

Written by Chris Claremont, Tony Isabella, Bill Mantlo
Art by John Byrne, Vince Colletta, Bob Hall, Don Heck, George Tuska
Cover by Gil Kane
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Collects Champions #1-11.

Okay, a god, a demon, a spy and two mutants walk into… resulting in some of the strangest scenarios of the ’70s! It’s gods vs. heroes in the City of Angels! With mad scientists, Russian super-spies, and guest-stars from Marvel’s western and horror eras! Plus: the secrets of the Black Widow! Featuring Hawkeye!

Champions Classic Vol. 1

Champions Classic Vol. 2

Written by John Byrne, Bill Mantlo, Jim Shooter
Art by John Byrne, Bob Hall, George Tuska
Cover by Ernie Chan
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Collects Champions (1975) #12-17, Iron Man Annual #4, Avengers #163, Super-Villain Team-Up #14 and Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #17-18.

Demon-gods, alien monsters and killer bees – it only goes to show that Angel, Iceman, Hercules, Black Widow and Ghost Rider did more before #17 than some teams get done by #50! The short-lived super-team squeezed multiple mayhem into mere months of masked marvelry! Featuring the Stranger and the Stilt-Man! Magneto and MODOK! The world reign of Doctor Doom! The Sentinels and the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants! Guest-starring Spider-Man and the Avengers! Plus: destined for the pages of Punisher War Journal…Rampage!

Champions Classic Vol. 2

Marvel Romance Redux: Another Kind Of Love

Written by Kyle J Baker, Peter David, Paul Di Filippo, Robert Loren Fleming, Keith Giffen, Roger Langridge, Joe R. Lansdale, Mike Leib, John Lustig, Jimmy Palmiotti, Jeff Parker, Kristen Sinclair, Fred Van Lente
Art by Sol Brodsky, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Vinnie Colletta, Dick Giordano, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, John Romita Jr.
Cover by Frank Cho
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Collects Marvel Romance Redux: But He Said He Loved Me!, I Should Have Been A Blonde, Love Is A Four-Letter Word, Restraining Orders Are For Other Girls And Guys & Dolls.

Continuing the noble pursuit of taking funny old pictures and putting funny words on top of them! We’ve asked some of the funniest writers in comics today to look at the romance comics of yesteryear and put in some new dialogue that’ll make us laugh! Unfortunately, the funniest writers were busy, so we had to settle on these guys. Hey, you get what you pay for.

Marvel Romance Redux: Another Kind Of Love

One Night With The Rebel Billionaire

Written by Trish Wylie
Art by Nayuna Sakurano
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Roane can’t help but feel excited as she discovers a naked man on the beach, his body chiseled like a statue’s. Under the silver moonlight, he catches her staring and teases her with a sinful and sexy smile. The next morning, she discovers that the mysterious man is Adam, a childhood friend who disappeared years ago. Roane’s nostalgic feelings of love for him soon come rushing back. But her sweet fantasy is destroyed when she discovers the real reason Adam has returned.

One Night With The Rebel Billionaire

A Place Of Storms

Written by Sara Craven
Art by Miyuki Yamaguchi
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“You must marry me, Andrea.” How could she feel anything but despair over this man’s proposal? Andrea was visiting Blaise at his imposing castle to convince him to break off his impulsive engagement to her cousin. But he managed to convince Andrea to be his bride in exchange. She tries to hate the cruel castle master who forced her into this contract marriage, but she begins to discover the pure heart behind his rough exterior…

A Place Of Storms

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 1

Written by, Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Millar, Brian K. Vaughan
Art by Mark Brooks, Steve Dillon, Jae Lee, Tom Raney
Cover by Bryan Hitch
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Collects Ultimate Fantastic Four Annual #1, Ultimate X-Men Annual #1, Ultimate Spider-Man Annual #1 And The Ultimates Annual #1.

The Ultimate Inhumans debut, two lives are forever changed, Ultimate Juggernaut returns, and everyone guest-stars in the first-ever Ultimate Annuals! In ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #1, it’s the first appearance of the Ultimate Inhumans! From a hidden race, she came to steal the heart of the FF’s youngest member: the beautiful elemental called Crystal! In ULTIMATE X-MEN ANNUAL #1, Juggernaut makes a play for the Gem of Cyttorak, the jewel that will make him truly unstoppable. Only two small things stand in his way: Rogue and Gambit, the new prince and princess of thieves! In ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #1, Spidey goes toe-to-toe with some old foes – and winds up with a new girlfriend! Who is she? Let’s just say she has a familiar face. And in THE ULTIMATES ANNUAL #1, if you thought the Ultimates were the only team S.H.I.E.L.D. was creating – you were wrong! Get ready for the next wave of super-soldiers designed to protect America’s vital interests. But is this all Director Nick Fury is up to, or is there much more to this ultra-clandestine program? And can even S.H.I.E.L.D. keep all these super-people under control?

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 1

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 2

Written by Brian Michael Bendis, Mike Carey, Charlie Huston, Robert Kirkman
Art by Mark Brooks, Mike Deodato Jr., Stuart Immonen, Frazer Irving, Salvador Larroca, Ryan Sook, Leinil Francis Yu
Cover by, Mike Deodato Jr
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Collects Ultimate Fantastic Four Annual #2, Ultimate X-Men Annual #2, Ultimate Spider-Man Annual #2 And The Ultimates Annual #2.

The Ultimate Annuals return with life-altering events! In ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #2, something strange has happened at Nursery Two, the Baxter Building’s Think Tank counterpart in Oregon. It’s disappeared, seemingly swallowed up by the earth itself! And if you think that heralds the return of the macabre Mole Man, go to the head of the class! In ULTIMATE X-MEN ANNUAL #2, Dazzler – Alison Blaire, former X-Man – has awakened from her coma only to discover her life is in deadly peril! And even her former fellow X-Men may be powerless to save her as a betrayal within the ranks has left them shell-shocked. In ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #2, Punisher and Daredevil return! While Foggy Nelson offers Spidey some legal advice, Police Captain Jean DeWolfe gives him some other advice – on how to take down the Ultimate Kangaroo! Will Peter Parker be able to navigate his way through this all-action moral maze, or will Punisher just shoot him instead? And in THE ULTIMATES ANNUAL #2, as the Ultimates clear the wreckage from the recent attack on the United States, a monstrous evil from the past rises from the ashes to launch an attack when America is at her weakest. And with the ranks of the Ultimates severely depleted, all that stands in the path of the long-thought-dead bio-fanatic Arnim Zola is the indomitable Sentinel of Liberty, Captain America, and Sam Wilson, the high-flying Falcon

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 2

Under The Brazilian Sun

Written by Catherine George
Art by Moe Fujisaki
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Catherine came to Portugal from England to inspect a painting. Roberto de Sousa, the man who requested her services, coldly dismisses her when he sees she’s a woman. Catherine’s determined to prove her worth to this former race car driver. But Roberto continues to avoid her, plagued by insecurities caused by the huge scar on his face from an accident. Yet his wild black curls and sexy gaze make Catherine feel as though her body is going to boil over. Scar and all, he is just too beautiful…

Under The Brazilian Sun

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ComiXology Delivers 7 New Digital Comics from Marvel and Harlequin

ComiXology has your digital hookup with seven new digital comics available for you right now. Check out new digital comics from Marvel and Harlequin. Get the full list here or the individual issues below.

Reform Of The Playboy

Written by Mary Lyons
Art by Mayu Takayama
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Harriet can’t believe it when a handsome lawyer steals a kiss from her and tells her that her lips are sweet. How had this happened? Upon inheriting a mansion from her great-aunt, Harriet had considered selling it, but in the end she decided to renovate and rent out the upper floors. Her tenant is Finn, the man who kissed her. He’s a troublemaker, hosting one party after another with countless women coming and going. Harriet goes to tell him that enough is enough! But Finn has other plans…

Reform Of The Playboy

Psi-Force Classic Vol. 1

Written by Danny Fingeroth, David Michelinie, Fabian Nicieza, Steve Perry
Art by Bob Hall, Mark Texeira, Mike Vosburg
Cover by Mark Texeira
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Collects Psi-Force #1-9.

Neither KGB nor CIA was a match for the power of PSI in the New Universe! Gathered together by the mysterious Emmett Proudhawk, five paranormal teenagers struggled against government operatives, renegade superhumans and, most importantly, each other! Telepathy, astral projection, telekinesis, psychic empathy and psionic detonation merge to form something even greater: the Psi-Hawk! But who he is – and isn’t – may be a secret that makes or breaks the team! It’s intrigue and action, eighties-style!

Psi-Force Classic Vol. 1

Rawhide Kid Masterworks Vol. 1

Written by Stan Lee
Art by Ross Andru, Dick Ayers, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, Paul Reinman
Cover by Richard Isanove, Jack Kirby
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Collects Rawhide Kid (1955) #17-25.

Tame the wild, wild West with the one and only Rawhide Kid! Before Stan “the Man” and “King” Kirby spun stories of sensational super heroes, they told the tale of a young frontiersman who bore two Colt six-shooters! After his Uncle Ben Bart was killed at the hands of outlaws, Johnny Bart made it his personal mission to bring justice to the town of Rawhide. Packed full of shootouts and showdowns, renegades and rustlers, guns and girls galore, these Western yarns will be sure to please you in the Mighty Marvel Manner! So hold on to your ten-gallon hat when you read tales of the Terrible Totem, the Kid’s battle against the bank-robbing Bat, and the war with Wolf Waco!

Rawhide Kid Masterworks Vol. 1

Rawhide Kid Masterworks Vol. 2

Written by Stan Lee
Art by Dick Ayers, Sol Brodsky, Gene Colan, Jack Davis, Al Hartley, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, Paul Reinman
Cover by Jack Kirby
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Collects Rawhide Kid (1955) #26-35.

They’re not just the pair that created the world’s most-famous super heroes; Stan Lee and Jack Kirby prove they’re the kings of all comics, with a one, two-gun second Rawhide Kid Masterworks!

The man from the Texas town of Rawhide, Johnny Bart, is the fastest draw in the wild West, but that kind of reputation doesn’t come easy, and with the law on his trail it’s all for one for the Rawhide Kid. Every no-good varmit west of the Mississippi from Mister Lightning to the Barker Brothers to Jasper Jelko is looking to build his rep over the Kid’s dead body, and when you’ve got friends like Jesse James, who needs enemies?! So do yerself some good book learin’, reserve your copy today, and one day you might be just as good as the roughest, toughest, rootin’est, tootin’est cowboy who ever kicked back a glass of milk!

Rawhide Kid Masterworks Vol. 2

Shanna The She-Devil: Survival Of The Fittest

Written by Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti
Art by Khari Evans
Cover by Khari Evans
Purchase

Collects Shanna The She Devil: Survival Of The Fittest #1-4.

Shanna the She-Devil returns in an all-new series jam-packed with jungle action, Hong Kong gangsters, dinosaurs, diamonds and cavemen! Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti reunite with super-hot artist Khari Evans (DAUGHTERS OF THE DRAGON) to bring you the story of modern-day pirates shipwrecked on the Marvel Universe’s deadliest island, where only Shanna can protect them from hordes of man-eating monsters!

Shanna The She-Devil: Survival Of The Fittest

Spider-Girl Presents The Buzz & Darkdevil

Written by Tom DeFalco, Ron Frenz
Art by Ron Frenz
Cover by Ron Frenz
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Collects The Buzz #1-3, Darkdevil #1-3.

When crime, cults, and clones collide, the result is Darkdevil, son of one great Marvel hero and heir to another! Peer into the future’s past to see Spider-Girl’s ill-mannered mentor face the mortal machinations of the Kingpin and the more mystical ones of Zarathos, one-time Ghost Rider! But the bold and bombastic Buzz has no time for legacies when he sets his brand-new super-suit against Doctor Octopus and his latest student! Twin tales of Spider-Girl’s strongest allies and harshest critics, guest-starring the one true Spider-Girl herself!

Spider-Girl Presents The Buzz & Darkdevil

Taming The Wolf #1

Written by Deborah Simmons
Art by Nanao Hidaka
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While traveling with her servants, Lady Marion’s caravan is attacked by bandits. A group of passing knights saves her and she accompanies them to their home, Campion Castle. Her arrival marks the beginning of her life among the wolves with Lord Campion and his six sons. One day, eldest son Dunstan returns to the castle and Marion feels something stir inside her that she has never felt before…

Taming The Wolf #1

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ComiXology Delivers 7 New Digital Comics for You Today from Marvel and Harlequin

ComiXology has a mix of new and classic comics for you today in their digital store. Get digital comics from Marvel and Harlequin. Check them all out here or the individual issues below.

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 1

Written by Ernie Hart, Stan Lee, Larry Lieber
Art by Dick Ayers, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, Larry Lieber
Cover by Richard Isanove, Jack Kirby
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Collects material from Tales To Astonish (1959) #27 and #35-52.

Burned under the magnifying glass of overwhelming demand, Mighty Marvel has given in to bring you our smallest hero in his first big Masterwork! Scientist Hank Pym invented an amazing growth serum and a cybernetic helmet, making him the Astonishing Ant-Man! Teamed with the winsome Wasp, the tiny twosome battle a sensational array of mini- and maxi-sized menaces from the Scarlet Beetle to the Black Knight! And if that’s not enough to occupy a man of science, he’s also defending the good ol’ U.S. of A.’s secrets from the Commie hordes! But we’ve got more than just miniature mayhem for you, True Believer — you can also look forward to the birth of the biggest Avenger there ever was: Giant-Man!

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 1

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 2

Written by Al Hartley, Leon Lazarus, Stan Lee, Larry Lieber
Art by Dick Ayers, Carl Burgos, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, Larry Lieber, Bob Powell
Cover by Jack Kirby
Purchase

Collects material from Tales To Astonish #53-69.

Hank Pym and his ladylove, Janet Van Dyne, make their highly requested return to the Marvel Masterworks in the concluding volume of Ant-Man/Giant-Man’s Silver Age adventures! Penned by no less than “The Man” himself, Stan Lee, and illustrated by an unmatched cadre of Bullpen embellishers from “Dazzling” Dick Ayers and “Sturdy” Steve Ditko to Golden Age greats Carl Burgos and Bob Powell, you’ll need high pockets to hold onto the action and adventure that’s in store for you. Giant-Man and the winsome Wasp have the decks stacked against them as they go up against an array of antagonists from the wild and weird Human Top, Porcupine, Colossus and the Wrecker to the Incredible Hulk, Attuma and Spider-Man! Also presenting the debut of the world’s tallest Avenger’s new look and the Wasp’s own solo feature!

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 2

Avengers Epic Collection: This Beachhead Earth

Written by Harlan Ellison, Roy Thomas
Art by Neal Adams, John Buscema, Sal Buscema, Frank Giacoia, Sam Grainger, Herb Trimpe
Cover by John Buscema
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Collects Avengers (1963) #77-97; Incredible Hulk (1968) #140.

Roy Thomas’ epic run continues with the origin of the Black Panther, the debut of the Lady Liberators, the return of the Squadron Sinister and the all-time classic Kree/Skrull War! Caught in a cosmic crossfire, Earth has become the staging ground for a conflict of star-spanning proportions! Two eternal intergalactic enemies — the merciless Kree and the shape-shifting Skrulls — have gone to war, and our planet is situated on the front lines! Can Earth’s Mightiest Heroes bring about an end to the fighting before humanity becomes a casualty of war? And what good are even a dozen super-powered champions against the vast military machines of two of the greatest empires in the cosmos?

Avengers Epic Collection: This Beachhead Earth

Britannia All At Sea

Written by Betty Neels
Art by Kuremi Hazama
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Head nurse Britannia finds herself strangely attracted to the stone-faced and stoic visiting professor Jake Luitingh van Thien.

Getting a glimpse into his softer side, Britannia takes him up on his offer to visit his hometown in Holland to find love…

Britannia All At Sea

Marvel Adventures Iron Man Vol. 3: Hero By Design

Written by Fred Van Lente
Art by Scott Koblish, Graham Nolan
Cover by Francis Tsai
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Collects Marvel Adventures Iron Man #9-12.

The Armored Avenger blasts through the third arc of his solo title in the critically acclaimed, best-selling Marvel Adventures line! Featuring an army of gray Iron Man armor automatons; the Chameleon; the spectacular Spider-Woman; the Living Laser; Canada’s greatest super heroes, Alpha Flight; Kiber the Cruel; and the return of Tony Stark’s missing father!

Marvel Adventures Iron Man Vol. 3: Hero By Design

Marvel Fanfare: Strange Tales

Written by Mike W. Barr, Charlie Boatner, Chris Claremont, Steven Grant, David Anthony Kraft, Bill Mantlo, Roger McKenzie, David Michelinie, Sandy Plunkett, Roger Stern, David Winn
Art by Joe Barney, Dave Cockrum, George Freeman, Michael Golden, Luke McDonnell, Sandy Plunkett, Marshall Rogers, P. Craig Russell, Paul Smith, Charles Vess, Trevor Von Eeden
Cover by Michael Golden
Purchase

Collects Marvel Fanfare #1-7.

One of Marvel’s most unique anthology titles had a strong start with a classic Spider-Man/X-Men team-up saga in the Savage Land, presented here in its entirety, with more than a half-dozen additional tales! Mister Fantastic, alone against Annihilus! Captain America faces a forgotten wartime legacy! The Hulk vs. the circus! Christmas with Daredevil! Deathlok, Hawkeye, Iron Man, Ian McNee of MYSTIC ARCANA fame and more!

Marvel Fanfare: Strange Tales

Marvel Illustrated: The Last Of The Mohicans

Written by Roy Thomas
Art by Steve Kurth, Denis Medri
Cover by John Watson
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Collects Marvel Illustrated: Last Of The Mohicans #1-6.

The first great hero in American fiction—in the first true American epic! Across the Eastern Wilderness rages the French and Indian War—with only a handful of English and Colonial troops standing in the path of the relentless army of General Montcalm and his fierce Iroquois allies. But arrayed against the invaders are Hawkeye, the fabled frontier scout, and his noble friends Chingachgook and Uncas, the only two survivors of the Mohican tribe. THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS is a tale of bravery and barbarism — of heroism amid the horrors of the final great war fought between the British and the French — and their Indian allies — for a land destined one day to seize its freedom in its own hands. James Fenimore Cooper’s famous novel has been adapted with all its legendary excitement intact by award-winning writer Roy Thomas, and artists Steven Kurth and Denis Medri.

Marvel Illustrated: The Last Of The Mohicans

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Preview: Marvel Masterworks Pin-Up HC

Marvel Masterworks Pin-Up HC

(W) Craig Yoe (A) John Severin, John Romita, Wally Wood (CA) Steve Ditko
In Shops: Nov 13, 2019
SRP: $34.99

An incredible artbook showcasing some of the greatest comic artists of all time! Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Jim Steranko, Don Heck, John Byrne, Barry Windsor-Smith, John Severin, Wally Wood, John Romita, and many more!
As part of the tremendous fun of Silver Age comics, artists created pin-ups of the most popular Marvel heroes and villains! Now the greatest of those works of art are gathered for the first time in a beautiful large-format hardback book! Included are rare examples of original art of The Thing, Spider-Man, and Dr. Strange.

True believers, thrill to pulsating pinups of Spidey, Thor, Iron Man, Captain America, The Avengers, Nick Fury, Daredevil, Millie the Model (!), and the ever lovin’ blue-eyed Thing-and many marvelous more!

Marvel Masterworks Pin-Up HC

Yoe Books Launches Marvel Hardcover Program

IDW Publishing and Yoe Books have announced a new line of Marvel Comics collections, a sensational series of large-format hardcovers curating the finest artwork from the Golden Age’s four-color foundations all the way up to the Marvel Age’s dizzying heights!

Coinciding with the year-long celebration of Marvel’s 80 years of publishing, Yoe Books will debut their retrospective look at the House of Ideas with Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups, which will be followed by additional entries in 2019.

In Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups, the pulsating pin-up artwork of legendary Silver Age creators – including Jack KirbySteve DitkoJim SterankoDon HeckJohn ByrneBarry Windsor-SmithJohn SeverinWally WoodDan DecarloJohn Romita, and many more – is collected for the first time ever into a single volume, accompanied throughout with witty wordage, pulse-pounding patter, and zany zingers by Stan “The Man” Lee!

Fans will treasure large, deftly drawn pin-ups by these marvelous artists of Spider-ManThorDoctor StrangeCaptain MarvelThe HulkThe X-Men, the Fantastic Four, and many more, plus nefarious villains led by Doctor Doom – and even Millie the Model by Dan DeCarlo!

Marvel Masterwork Pin-Ups
Almost American
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