Tag Archives: brian k vaughan

Workers of the world! Here’s a list of comics to celebrate your Labor Day

Ah, the pleasures of having Labor Day off to celebrate work. It’s a contradiction as old as time, where honoring work means taking a (well-deserved and utterly necessary) break from it. After all, most workers have jobs that go year-round and the daily grind does take a toll. A day off is the least that can be afforded to them.

Recognition is the other thing we should doling out in industrial quantities during this federal holiday. As such, comic books are filled with stories about the fruits of labor, both in a literal and a politically figurative sense. Be it by actually exploring the hardships of being a worker to acknowledging the monumental task that is organizing movements in support of them, labor is central to the motivations behind some of comic’s best stories.

Here’s a short list of comics that either directly or indirectly showcase the roles workers play in keeping life and society functional. These comics dive headfirst into the specifics of what ‘putting in the work’ means, recognizing that everything that’s done in the service of others usually rests on human struggles both painful and exhausting. The comics below give workers their time in the spotlight so we can appreciate just how much it takes to go out and keep the world turning.

Labor Day Comics
Trashed

1. Trashed, written and illustrated by Derf Backderf

This book can best be described as a sobering love letter to one of the most underappreciated and openly repudiated jobs known to humankind: garbage collection. Following Backderf’s critically-acclaimed My Best Friend Dahmer, Trashed is based on the author’s time as a sanitation worker himself, surrounded by other workers just as enthused about collecting trash as he was (which wasn’t a whole lot). The inner workings of sanitation are presented through a combination of autobiographical anecdotes and well-researched facts and data that reveal just how complex, dangerous, and even clumsy picking up and storing trash can be. It’s a funny but scary look at how sanitation can save the world while also turn it into a ticking time bomb.

Damage Control

2. Damage Control, originally created by Dwayne McDuffie (W) and Ernie Colón (A)

A superhero’s job is to save the day, crumbling infrastructure be damned. With them, though, comes a unique concern for property damage, mostly focused on the inevitability of mass destruction. In comes a company solely dedicated to cleaning up after extinction-level battles and then putting the pieces back together called Damage Control. In essence, this Marvel comic is about unsung heroes. It’s about doing essential work knowing there’s no glory waiting at the end of it (much like Trashed, in some respects). McDuffie’s scripts are a masterclass on chaos and property politics, but it’s Colón’s attention to detail amidst the chaos that sets this story apart. The original series (there are a total of 4 series published) takes to a kind of MAD Magazine-style approach to comedy with visual gags and crude humor leading the charge, but it’s all well-orchestrated and it makes for reading that rewards those who scan comics pages whole multiple times.

Labor Day Comics
She-Hulk

3. She-Hulk: Law and Disorder, written by Charles Soule and illustrated by Javier Pulido

At a glance, Soule and Pulido’s She-Hulk gives the impression of being a kind of ‘slice of life’ story about a superhero that chooses law as her preferred battleground. The book, however, is about so much more, and it might have more in common with Damage Control than an actual legal drama. She-Hulk takes the anger-filled superhero and turns her into a working-class woman that’s trying (and struggling) to make her own legal services business work. She puts it all together from the ground up but is immediately confronted with the hardships of balancing work, heroics, and the semblance of a personal life on an even keel. One of the greatest, and most entertaining, aspects of the comic lies in the formation of the character’s legal practice and how at odds it can be being both a superhero and a normal person with other interests. It dives deep into the complications of working multiple jobs, but it shows an appreciation for those who lead their lives under that predicament. Soule and Pulido create a story that supports and applauds those who undertake the task of holding several jobs at once, honoring the sacrifice it requires of one’s self to survive it.

Labor Day Comics
Ex Machina

4. Ex Machina, written by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Tony Harris

While aggressively political and metaphorical, Ex Machina does something few other stories on governmental responsibility manage to achieve: make the role of an elected official look and feel like a real job. The story follows Mitchel Hundred, a man that renounces his superhero persona to become mayor of New York city. After only managing to save one of the Twin Towers during the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Hundred realizes he can do more good as an elected official rather than as a superhero. Vaughan and Harris take full advantage of this setup to go beyond political speeches and discourse to get Hundred’s hands dirty with the real act of running a government. Hundred has to address the legality of surveillance in times of crisis, protocols for public demonstrations, controversial content in city museums, infrastructure, and police freedoms all while controlling the urge to use his still functioning superpowers to speed the process up. As is the case in She-Hulk, Hundred also attempts (with few successes) to balance his personal life with the job. Problem is, the job demands too much of his time, hence the temptation to use his powers. Ex Machina is a stark reminder that being an elected official actually means holding down a job with real consequences attached to it, something many politicians seem to have lost sight of.

Gotham Central

5. Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty, written by Ed Brubaker & Greg Rucka and illustrated by Michael Lark

The profession of law enforcement is under serious scrutiny at the present moment, and rightfully so, but it’s still a job certain men and women take on despite the complexities of outdated and dysfunctional practices that are in desperate need of revision. And that’s on top of the racial problems that have shaped its many, many systems. However, there are those who do take the job seriously and work hard to ‘protect and serve’ with the best of intentions under the law. Gotham Central prioritizes this viewpoint, focusing the cops and detectives that work in Batman’s Gotham City. Without the resources or the exceptions afforded to the Dark Knight, the GCPD is still tasked with responding to criminal activity, regardless of whether it’s of the supervillain type or not. Main characters René Montoya, Crispus Allen, Marcus Driver, and “Josie Mac” MacDonald, among others, are divided into day and night shifts in a city that is in a constant flux of crime. The job takes its toll on a personal level and there’s an emphasis on how much one gives in the line of duty, but there’s also an appreciation of honest cops walking the line in the face of overwhelming police corruption and abuse. It’s a complicated and sometimes contradictory read, but it makes no excuses while confronting the damning inconsistencies of the job.

Labor Day comics
Wooblies!: A Graphic History of the Industrial Workers of the World

6. Wooblies! A Graphic History of the Industrial Workers of the World, edited by Peter Buhle & Nicole Schulman

The Industrial Workers of the World, or IWW, has a wild and exuberant history, to say the least, which makes it the ideal subject for comic book storytelling. The IWW was created in Chicago, Illinois in 1905 as a union for marginalized workers led by Marxist principles. Miners, lumber workers, immigrant workers, indigenous workers, non-white workers, severely underrepresented female workers, and workers all over that had no rights or protections saw in the IWW as the means to fight towards better working conditions. Wooblies! (alluding to the nickname given to the members of the union) enlists the talents of cartoonists such as Peter Kuper, Harvey Pekar, Trina Robbins, Sharon Rudahl, Sue Coe, Carlos Cortez, among others to tell the story of how forgotten and underrepresented workers rose up against the odds to gain the rights and respect owed to them. The anthology has a very underground ‘comix’ feel to it, but it’s allegorical and metaphorical inclinations do a better job of capturing labor struggles better than a traditional story ever could. This might be the quintessential Labor Day reading right here.


Workers, laborers, holders of jobs, these comics honor your contributions, your efforts, and the near impossible feats you pull off. Read and relax, but overall, enjoy your hard-earned Labor Day holiday.

Review: The Walking Dead: Alien

The Walking Dead: Alien

Fresh and fast-paced, The Walking Dead: The Alien books captures all the excitement of The Walking Dead. Originally released on Panel Syndicate, then as a “Local Comic Shop Day” special release, it’s now out as a hardcover graphic novel.

If the slowing, shuffling pacing of The Walking Dead’s narrative made you feel a bit like a walker yourself, Alien is a chance to revisit what it felt like to start reading the series. Of course, the greatest horror is that it’s only one issue. But, still, it’s an issue written by Brian K. Vaughan.

Taking place near the beginning of the outbreak, the story follows Jeff as he tries to survive Barcelona. After being rescued by the armored Claudia, the two begin to decide what the next course of action should be.

The absolute best aspect of this book is the way it puts zombies back at the forefront of the threats our characters face. It’s not bogged down with trade agreements, or putting on a fair. It takes the premise readers all know and love and puts it a new scenario with characters we don’t absolutely know are going to survive.

Obviously a great deal of credit has to be given to Robert Kirkman for everything he’s done with these stories for so many years. However, it is such a breath of fresh air to see the story through the eyes of a new creative team. The reader races through the story in anticipation, eager to recapture the sense of not knowing what would happen next. As the story is a one-shot, I won’t tell you, either.

The art by Marcos Martin is fantastic. He’s joined on gray tones by regular Walking Dead contributor Cliff Rathburn. Originally released digitally, the comic uses the turn of pages effectively to create suspense as you make your way through the story. The digital experience of going panel by panel or staring at a screen is different than on a printed page but the translation feels like it enhances things in a way. There’s an excitement and tension that flows from panel to panel not just page to page. There’s also a focus on the fact it’s early in the pandemic so the zombies are decayed as much. It’s a small detail that stands out. Rus Wooton‘s lettering is top-notch as well really delivering the tone of a scene full of excitement, somber, or the need to stay relatively quiet.

The hardcover includes sketches and notes from the creation of the comic adding a nice “director’s commentary” feel to the release and making it special. I have no idea if this was included in the previous physical release but it’s a nice addition that turns it from a floppy I’d like to a hardcover comic I’d like.

If you’re a fan of The Walking Dead, The Walking Dead: The Alien is a must get. If you just like good storytelling, the team nails it delivering an emotional punch and the highs and lows of a roller coaster. Ever since it’s first release, I had hoped we’d see more creative teams given a shot to expand upon the world Kirkman created but, when your initial attempt is so good, I’m not sure they’d be able to live up to the high bar initially set out.

Story: Brian K. Vaughan Art: Marcos Martin
Gray Tones: Cliff Rathburn Letterer: Rus Wooton
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: AmazonBookshop

Saga: Compendium One Arrives Early this Week

Image Comics has announced that the highly anticipated Saga: Compendium One trade paperback by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples, which was initially announced with a September release date, has arrived in stores early and will be available for sale tomorrow Wednesday, August 21.

Longtime fans of the series need not wait any longer to snap up the binge-worthy tome which clocks in at over 1,200 pages of epic, space operatic, award-winning adventure.

Collecting the first nine volumes of the full color, critically acclaimed, New York Times bestselling series into one massive paperback, the Saga: Compendium One tells the entire story (so far!) of a girl named Hazel and her star-crossed parents. 

The Saga: Compendium One (ISBN: 978-1-5343-1346-0, Diamond Code MAY190044) includes a new cover from Eisner Award-winning Saga co-creator and artist Fiona Staples along with issues #1-54 of the series.

Saga: Compendium One

Brian K. Vaughan to Appear at Baltimore Comic-Con 2019

Tales From the Age of Apocalypse

Join the Baltimore Comic-Con this October 18-20, 2019 for the 20th Anniversary Baltimore Comic-Con, appearing at the Inner Harbor’s Baltimore Convention Center. The Baltimore Comic-Con has announced the first appearance of comics industry titan Brian K. Vaughan on Friday, October 18th and Saturday, October 19th. Special Fan Package tickets are available for meeting and interacting with Brian, in addition to his signing at the show both days. Tickets to the show can now be purchased online.

Brian K Vaughan (or BKV for short) is the writer and co-creator of the critically acclaimed SagaY: The Last ManEx MachinaRunawaysPride of BaghdadThe HoodThe EscapistsThe Private Eye, a digital comic with artist Marcos Martin at PanelSyndicate.com, and, most recently, Paper Girls.

Vaughan’s professional comics writing career began at Marvel Comics on Tales From the Age of Apocalypse. He later went on to write for some of Marvel’s highest-profile characters, including Spider-Man, Captain America, and the X-Men, as well as penning noteworthy limited series such as Doctor Strange: The Oath and The Hood. He went on to write for DC Comics, where he wrote Batman and Green Lantern: Circle of Fire, and Dark Horse Comics, writing for Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight.

Y: The Last Man

Vaughan began writing series featuring his own characters. Y: The Last Man is a 60-issue post-apocalyptic science fiction series about the only man to survive the apparent simultaneous death of every male mammal on Earth. Published through DC’s Vertigo imprint, the series received Eisner Awards in 2005 and 2008, and numerous other nominations. Adaptation to screen has been a long time coming, and after a series of false starts, Y: The Last Man will finally see the transition from page to screen in 2020 at FX. Vaughan will executive produce and developed the series.

Ex Machina

Vaughan’s Ex Machina ran from 2004-2010, and is a political thriller featuring Mitchell Hundred. Hundred, an ex-superhero known as the Great Machine, performed great acts of heroism during the 9/11 attacks in 2001, and is elected Mayor of New York City as a result. Set during Hundred’s term in office, and interwoven with flashbacks to his past as the Great Machine, the series explores both the political situations Hundred finds himself in and the mysteries surrounding his superpowers. New Line Cinema purchased the film rights to the series in July 2005, and commissioned Vaughan to write one of the two commissioned scripts, which he was reported to be working on in 2007.

Saga

The epic space opera/fantasy series Saga debuted in 2012 through Image Comics. Working with artist Fiona Staples, the series depicts two aliens from warring races trying to survive with their newborn daughter. The first issue sold out of its first printing ahead of its March 14 release date, with a second printing ordered for April 11, the same release date for issue #2. The series has been extremely well-reviewed by comics press, book press, and general media, and it has also appeared on the New York Times Graphic Books Best Seller List. It won three Eisner Awards in 2013, a Hugo Award, and was nominated for seven Harvey Awards, including wins in 2013-2016 for Best Continuing or Limited Series, in addition to multiple individual nominations for both Vaughan and Staples.

Vaughan’s Paper Girls is a mystery/science fiction series, with illustrator by Cliff Chiang, from Image Comics. Paper Girls follows the story of four 12-year-old newspaper delivery girls in Stony Stream, a fictional suburb of Cleveland, OH who, while out delivering papers on the morning after Halloween, find themselves in the midst of an invasion from a mysterious force from the future. The girls become unwillingly caught up in the conflict between two warring factions of time-travelers. Paper Girls won two Eisner Awards in 2016 for Best New Series and Best Penciller/Inker. In 2017, the first compilation was shortlisted for the Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story, and received a Best Series nomination for the inaugural Ringo Awards.


Brian K. Vaughan Ticket options are as follows:

Brian K. Vaughan Friday Fan Package (Limited availability of 50 — Friday Only) includes:

  • Exclusive Friday meet and greet
  • 10 Autographs
  • 1 Signed Print
  • Selfie

Does not include convention admission.

Brian K. Vaughn Saturday Fan Package (Limited availability of 50 — Saturday only) includes:

  • Exclusive Saturday meet and greet
  • 10 Autographs
  • 1 Signed Print
  • Selfie!

Does not include convention admission.


In addition to on-site CGC grading, this year’s confirmed guests for the show include: Joel Adams (Savage Eve), Neal Adams (Detective Comics), Zeea Adams (Neal Adams Monsters), Art Way Alliance, Brian Azzarello (Batman: Damned), Jeremy Bastian (Jim Henson’s Labyrinth: Under The Spell), Marty Baumann (Disney/Pixar), Carolyn Belefski (Curls), Ziggy Blumenthal (Operation Pajama Pants), Harold Buchholz (MST3K), Mark Buckingham (Justice League Dark), Cullen Bunn (Harrow County, courtesy of AfterShock Comics), Greg Burnham (Tuskegee Heirs), Buzz (Superman: Coming of the Supermen), Jim Calafiore (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Chris Campana (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles), Joe Carabeo (The Legettes), Richard Case (Doom Patrol), Christa Cassano (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Freshman Force), Castillo Studios, Jacob Chabot (Ziggy Pig – Silly Seal Comics), Howard Chaykin (Hey Kids! Comics!), Frank Cho (Harley Quinn), Amy Chu (KISS: The End), Matthew oClark (Injustice: Ground Zero), Steve Conley (The Middle Age), Steve Conte (Action Figure Kingdom), Katie Cook (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), Jamie Cosley (Star Wars Insider), Clayton Crain (Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales, courtesy of Frankie’s Comics), Kristina Deak-Linsner (Vampirella: Roses for the Dead), The Deans Family (La Moo Du Chocolat: A Shakes Adventure), Steve Ellis (The Only Living Girl), Tod Emko and Piggy (A Piggy’s Tale), Steve Englehart (Doctor Strange, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Garth Ennis (The Boys, Friday and Saturday only), Rob Feldman (Cyko KO), Chris Flick (Capes & Babes), LJ and Kayla Fowlkes (The Adventures of CHIBIWONGTONG), Shea Fontana (DC SuperHero Girls), Francesco Francavilla (Red Sonja and Vampirella Meet Betty and Veronica), Franco (Superman of Smallville), Julie Fujii Sakai (Usagi Yojimbo: The Hidden), John Gallagher (Max Meow), David Gallaher (The Only Living Girl), SL Gallant (Magic: The Gathering: Chandra – Tales of Alara), Jose Luis Garcia-Lopez (DC Nation), Mitch Gerads (Mr. Miracle), Gerhard (Cerberus the Aardvark), Chris Giarrusso (Hashtag: Danger), Jimmy Gownley (Disney Zootopia: School Days), Garth Graham (Star Power), John Patrick Green (Kim Possible Adventures), Dawn Griffin (Zorphbert & Fred), Juanjo Guarnido (Blacksad),  Laura Lee Gulledge (Will & Whit), Bob Hall (West Coast Avengers), Cully Hamner (Batman Beyond), N. Steven Harris (Michael Cray), Dean Haspiel (Bloodshot Rising Spirit), Greg Hildebrandt (Old Man Logan), Clinton Hobart (Disney fine artist), Javon and Tarik Holmes (The Adventuers of Waffle Boy), Adam Hughes (Superman), Jamal Igle (Wrong Earth), Klaus Janson (New Challengers), Justin Jordan (Reaver), Kata Kane (G.F.F.s Ghost Friends Forever), Chris Kemple (The Mike Wieringo Tellos Tribute), Matt Kindt (X-O Manowar), Sharlene Kindt (Dept. H), Tom King (Batman), Greg Land (Hulkverines, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Jim Lee (Batman: Hush, Saturday only), Jeff Lemire (Black Hammer), Joseph Michael Linsner (Red Sonja), Howard Mackie (Ghost Rider), Mike Manley (Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Comic), Chris Mariano (Claire Lost Her Bear at the World’s Fair), Mark Mariano (Puddleton Farm: Ewing! What Are You Doing?), Ron Marz (Turok), Xavier McLaren (The Bubbler), John McCrea (Hitman, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Bob McLeod (New Mutants), Carla Speed McNeil (Twisted Romance), Pop Mhan (Raven, Daughter of Darkness), David Michelinie (Amazing Spider-Man, Saturday and Sunday only, courtesy of The Living Corpse), Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez (Ricanstruction: Reminiscing & Rebuilding Puerto Rico), Mark Morales (Justice League), Jamar Nicholas (Leon: Protector of the Playground), Kevin Nowlan (Black Widow, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Jerry Ordway (Archie Meets Batman ’66), Rachel Ordway (FTL, Y’all!), Greg Pak (Star Wars), Dan Parent (Archie: The Married Life – 10th Anniversary), Paul Pelletier (Aquaman/Jabberjaw Special), Andrew Pepoy (Archie: The Married Life – 10th Anniversary), Mike Perkins (Swamp Thing), David Petersen (Mouse Guard), Mark Poulton (Koni Waves), Andy Price (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic), Dave Proch (Mango Lizard), Livio Ramondelli (Transformers), Ron Randall (Trekker), Tom Raney (Dog Days of Summer), Afua Richardson (Run), Rafer Roberts (Grumble), Don Rosa (The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck), Peter Rostovsky (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Freshman Force), Craig Rousseau (Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Dimension X), Mike Royer (New Gods), Arsia Rozegar (Man Plus), Stan Sakai (Usagi Yojimbo), Stuart Sayger (KISS: The End), Bob Schreck (Batman: Hush), Greg Schigiel (Pix: One Weirdest Weekend), Erica Schultz (Xena: Warrior Princess), Bart Sears (Turok), Jeff Shultz (Archie Jumbo Comics Digest), Louise Simonson (Death of Superman), Walter Simonson (Ragnarok), Andy Smith (Demi-God), Brian “Smitty” Smith (The Stuff of Legend), John K. Snyder III (Killers), Allison Sohn (The Art of Red Sonja, Volume 2), Charles Soule (Curse Words), Brian Stelfreeze (Rise of the Black Panther), Jim Steranko (Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.), Karl Story (Star Wars: Age of Rebellion – Han Solo), William Stout (Fantastic Worlds – The Art of William Stout), Ty Templeton (Marvel Super-Hero Adventures, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Michael Terracciano (Star Power), David and Sarah Trustman (The Memory Arts), Billy Tucci (Shi), Brian K. Vaughan (Paper Girls), Gus Vazquez (Big Hero 6), Emilio Velez Jr. (The Dodgeball Teens), Robert Venditti (Hawkman), Doug Wagner (The Hard Place), Mark Waid (Avengers: No Road Home), Adam Wallenta (Punk Taco), Adam Warren (Empowered And Sistah Spooky’s High School Hell), Todd Webb (Mr. Toast Comics), Lee Weeks (Batman), Bob Wiacek (Iron Man), Marcus Williams (Tuskegee Heirs), Javier Cruz Winnik (Puerto Rico Strong), Marv Wolfman (Raven: Daughter of Darkness, courtesy of Hero Initiative), Rich Woodall (Electric Black), John Workman (Riverdale), Kelly Yates (Torchwood), and Thom Zahler (Star Trek: Waypoint Special 2019).

Abbott, Black Panther, Monstress, On a Sunbeam, Paper Girls, and Saga Nominated for the 2019 Hugo Awards

Hugo Award

Today, the finalists for the 2019 Hugo Awards, Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book, and John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards were announced online today by Dublin 2019.

Below are the nominees for “Best Graphic Story” and you can get the full list of nominees here. Three Image Comics series were nominated while BOOM!, Marvel, and First Second all received one nomination.

Congrats to all those nominated!

  • Abbott, written by Saladin Ahmed, art by Sami Kivelä, colours by Jason Wordie, letters by Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)
  • Black Panther: Long Live the King, written by Nnedi Okorafor and Aaron Covington, art by André Lima Araújo, Mario Del Pennino and Tana Ford (Marvel)
  • Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image Comics)
  • On a Sunbeam, by Tillie Walden (First Second)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 4, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image Comics)
  • Saga, Volume 9, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Below are the finalists for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards for “Best Graphic Story.”

  • Buck Rogers: Martians Invade Jupiter, by Philip Nowlan and Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Flash Gordon: Fiery Desert of Mongo, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Garth, by Steve Dowling (Daily Mirror)
  • Plastic Man #1: The Game of Death, by Jack Cole (Vital Publications)
  • Le Secret de la Licorne [The Secret of the Unicorn], by Hergé (Le Soir)
  • Wonder Woman #5: Battle for Womanhood, written by William Moulton Marsden, art by Harry G. Peter (DC Comics)

Review: Wolverine: Logan

Wolverine: Logan collects the three issue series from Brian K. Vaughan and Eduardo Risso that gives us a moment that “re-forged Logan in the flames of love, death, and destruction.” It features color by Dean White and lettering by Joe Caramagna.

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on February 19! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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FX Orders Y: The Last Man to Series

Y: The Last Man

It’s been a bit since we heard any news concerning the television adaptation of Brian K. Vaughan‘s Y: The Last Man. Today, The Hollywood Reporter has reported that the series has been ordered and will come to screens in 2020.

After years of on and off, it looks like the beloved comic series is finally on. FX has announced it picked up the tv adaptation and handed out an order for it. Michael Green and Aïda Mashaka Croal are showrunners and executive producers for the series and it stars Barry Keoghan and Diane Lane. The cast also includes Amber Tamblyn, Imogen Poots, Lashana Lynch, Juliana Canfield, and Marin Ireland.

Originally published by DC ComicsVertigo imprint the series was created by Vaughan and artist Pia Guerra running for 60 issues. The story revolves around Yorick Brown (Keoghan) who is the last surviving human with a Y chromosome, along with his Capuchin monkey, Ampersand.

Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson, and Vaughan executive produce and developed the series. Melina Matsoukas directed the pilot.

It’s been a long path for the comic to make it to screen. FX began development in 2015 after New Line scrapped plans to make it a feature film. New Line acquired the rights in 2007. New Line wanted to create one two-hour stand-alone film whole others wanted a three-film franchise. Others set to develop it in March 2012 and that fell apart with the rights beginning to revert back to Vaughan in September 2014. In 2017 Vaughan said he was looking for a partner who loved the source material but not afraid to change it. The story has evolved some becoming more relevant today focusing on toxic masculinity and in the age of #MeToo and the Trump Presidency.

Brian K. Vaughan Signs a Deal with Legendary Entertainment

Comic book, television, and film writer Brian K. Vaughan has signed a three year overall deal with Legendary Entertainment. This is the first of this sort of deal for Vaughan and plays to Legendary’s finders in television, movies, as well as comics.

Legendary will adapt some of Vaughan’s creator-owned comics as well as exclusive original projects developed by Vaughan.

Vaughan is a celebrated comic creator and created or co-created such series as Saga, Paper Girls, Ex Machina, Barrier, and We Stand on Guard.

Currently, his classic Y: The Last Man is being adapted by FX and Marvel’s Runaways, which he created, will see its second season soon debut on Hulu. Vaughan also was one of the writers for Lost and developed Stephen King’s Under the Dome for CBS.

Barrier Gets a Limited Edition Slipcase Set

Image Comics is releasing a special limited edition slipcase for Barrier, Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin’s acclaimed science fiction miniseries, this March.

To celebrate serialized comic books (and the awesome stores that sell them!), Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin have no plans to ever release a collected edition of their Eisner-nominated miniseries Barrier. But for everyone looking for a way to store or display all five original issues, look no further than this gorgeous new slipcase—the perfect home for the unconventional sci-fi drama about violence, language, and illegal immigration.

Barrier Limited Edition Slipcase Set (Diamond code: NOV180090) and Barrier Limited Edition Slipcase (Empty) (Diamond code: NOV180091) will be available on Wednesday, March 27th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, December 3rd.

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