Tag Archives: brian k vaughan

Abbott, Black Panther, Monstress, On a Sunbeam, Paper Girls, and Saga Nominated for the 2019 Hugo Awards

Hugo Award

Today, the finalists for the 2019 Hugo Awards, Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book, and John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards were announced online today by Dublin 2019.

Below are the nominees for “Best Graphic Story” and you can get the full list of nominees here. Three Image Comics series were nominated while BOOM!, Marvel, and First Second all received one nomination.

Congrats to all those nominated!

  • Abbott, written by Saladin Ahmed, art by Sami Kivelä, colours by Jason Wordie, letters by Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)
  • Black Panther: Long Live the King, written by Nnedi Okorafor and Aaron Covington, art by André Lima Araújo, Mario Del Pennino and Tana Ford (Marvel)
  • Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image Comics)
  • On a Sunbeam, by Tillie Walden (First Second)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 4, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image Comics)
  • Saga, Volume 9, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Below are the finalists for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards for “Best Graphic Story.”

  • Buck Rogers: Martians Invade Jupiter, by Philip Nowlan and Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Flash Gordon: Fiery Desert of Mongo, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Garth, by Steve Dowling (Daily Mirror)
  • Plastic Man #1: The Game of Death, by Jack Cole (Vital Publications)
  • Le Secret de la Licorne [The Secret of the Unicorn], by Hergé (Le Soir)
  • Wonder Woman #5: Battle for Womanhood, written by William Moulton Marsden, art by Harry G. Peter (DC Comics)

Review: Wolverine: Logan

Wolverine: Logan collects the three issue series from Brian K. Vaughan and Eduardo Risso that gives us a moment that “re-forged Logan in the flames of love, death, and destruction.” It features color by Dean White and lettering by Joe Caramagna.

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on February 19! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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FX Orders Y: The Last Man to Series

Y: The Last Man

It’s been a bit since we heard any news concerning the television adaptation of Brian K. Vaughan‘s Y: The Last Man. Today, The Hollywood Reporter has reported that the series has been ordered and will come to screens in 2020.

After years of on and off, it looks like the beloved comic series is finally on. FX has announced it picked up the tv adaptation and handed out an order for it. Michael Green and Aïda Mashaka Croal are showrunners and executive producers for the series and it stars Barry Keoghan and Diane Lane. The cast also includes Amber Tamblyn, Imogen Poots, Lashana Lynch, Juliana Canfield, and Marin Ireland.

Originally published by DC ComicsVertigo imprint the series was created by Vaughan and artist Pia Guerra running for 60 issues. The story revolves around Yorick Brown (Keoghan) who is the last surviving human with a Y chromosome, along with his Capuchin monkey, Ampersand.

Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson, and Vaughan executive produce and developed the series. Melina Matsoukas directed the pilot.

It’s been a long path for the comic to make it to screen. FX began development in 2015 after New Line scrapped plans to make it a feature film. New Line acquired the rights in 2007. New Line wanted to create one two-hour stand-alone film whole others wanted a three-film franchise. Others set to develop it in March 2012 and that fell apart with the rights beginning to revert back to Vaughan in September 2014. In 2017 Vaughan said he was looking for a partner who loved the source material but not afraid to change it. The story has evolved some becoming more relevant today focusing on toxic masculinity and in the age of #MeToo and the Trump Presidency.

Brian K. Vaughan Signs a Deal with Legendary Entertainment

Comic book, television, and film writer Brian K. Vaughan has signed a three year overall deal with Legendary Entertainment. This is the first of this sort of deal for Vaughan and plays to Legendary’s finders in television, movies, as well as comics.

Legendary will adapt some of Vaughan’s creator-owned comics as well as exclusive original projects developed by Vaughan.

Vaughan is a celebrated comic creator and created or co-created such series as Saga, Paper Girls, Ex Machina, Barrier, and We Stand on Guard.

Currently, his classic Y: The Last Man is being adapted by FX and Marvel’s Runaways, which he created, will see its second season soon debut on Hulu. Vaughan also was one of the writers for Lost and developed Stephen King’s Under the Dome for CBS.

Barrier Gets a Limited Edition Slipcase Set

Image Comics is releasing a special limited edition slipcase for Barrier, Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin’s acclaimed science fiction miniseries, this March.

To celebrate serialized comic books (and the awesome stores that sell them!), Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin have no plans to ever release a collected edition of their Eisner-nominated miniseries Barrier. But for everyone looking for a way to store or display all five original issues, look no further than this gorgeous new slipcase—the perfect home for the unconventional sci-fi drama about violence, language, and illegal immigration.

Barrier Limited Edition Slipcase Set (Diamond code: NOV180090) and Barrier Limited Edition Slipcase (Empty) (Diamond code: NOV180091) will be available on Wednesday, March 27th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, December 3rd.

Underrated: Pride Of Baghdad

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Pride of Baghdad



Prideofbaghdad.jpgPublished by Vertigo  in 2006, Pride of Baghdad is graphic novel that tells the story of four lions who escaped the Baghdad zoo after an American bombing in 2003. Although the tale is based on a true story, the points of view it is told from trend further toward fiction than truth. Written by Brian K Vaughn, with art by Nico Henrichon the graphic novel actually won IGN’s “Best Original Graphic Novel” award the year it was released, but there has been very little chatter about the book since – though my benchmark for that is the fact I found the book in a thrift shop for $5 and had never heard of it before, and so twelve years after it was released, I wanted to let you know about the book.

I’m a little behind.

Pride of  Baghdad can be enjoyed on multiple levels, making it the rare book that can provide a different story each time you read it depending on what you want to take away from it. If you’re looking for a family’s tale of survival in a strange and barely familiar world then you will find that here. If you want a questioning look at the nature of freedom, war, family, captivity… then you will also be able to experience that. Vaughn and Henrichon were able to deliver a multifaceted book that offers an astoundingly deep story juxtaposed against a survivalist tale that works even if you don’t want to delve further into the commentary on the deeper aspects of the tale – it’s also possible that you simply didn’t pick up on that commentary – no judgement here. I didn’t the first time I read it, which leads me to my final point: the more you read this, the better it gets.

Pride of Baghdad is a phenomenal work, and it’s featured here because I had never heard about it until I saw it in the thrift shop – that’s why this is Underrated.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Barrier is Collected at Panel Syndicate

If you missed it, now’s your chance to get Barrier! Panel Syndicate has collected all five issues into a monster 190-page volume!

If you haven’t read the single issues, yet, this is the perfect way to catch up with the adventures of our kick-ass Texan woman, Liddy, and her unlikely partner, the no-nonsense undocumented Honduran immigrant, Oscar, in what’s surely got to be Donald Trump’s favorite comicbook series!

Check it out at panelsyndicate.com for whatever price you want to pay!

Saga #54 Heads Back to Print

Image Comics has announced that issue Saga #54 of Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ multiple Eisner Award-winning series—which marks the “season finale” of the space opera’s ninth arc—is being fast-tracked for a second printing in order to keep up with overwhelming customer demand.

Saga’s ninth—and most shocking—story arc tackles fake news and genuine terror through the lens of our favorite spacefaring family and their fellow outcast companions.

Saga #54, 2nd printing (Diamond code: JUN188387) will be available on Wednesday, August 22nd. The final order cutoff deadline for retailers is Monday, July 30th.

Saga, Vol. 9 (Diamond code: JUL180297, ISBN: 978-1-5343-0837-4) hits comics shops on Wednesday, September 26th and bookstores on Tuesday, October 2nd.

Review: Barrier #1

Barrier is an unconventional drama about violence, language, and illegal immigration…with a shocking sci-fi twist. Originally published on Panel Syndicate, the five issue miniseries is a deeply layered entertaining comic that will make you think.

In print for the first time by Image Comics, this first issue is a bit special. One version was released for free on Free Comic Day, but today sees the release of a special collector’s edition in a larger size to match the next four issues which will be released weekly through May. The comic features a cardstock cover, printed in the original landscape format, and is meant to be a durable work of art. You’ll need to get it as these print issues as there’s no plan to collect these issues in print.

So, the printing is special but how about the comic?

Barrier is amazing with a multilayered look at society and those things that divide us written by Brian K. Vaughan. Language, immigration, borders, class, it’s all touched upon and is as relevant today as when it was first released digitally. The story follows two individuals, Liddy, a rancher in Texas, and Oscar, an immigrant making his way to the United States from Honduras. That aspect of the story feels like it’s an even greater punch in the stomach considering the recent migrant train that has reached the border of the United States from Honduras attempting to escape violence and threats to their lives. Through the two of them we see the abuses when it comes to undocumented immigration and the story touches upon the horrors.

Presented in English and Spanish, without translation, the story at first leads you to believe the barrier is distance, or borders, and the ability to seek a better life. This alone is the material for a long comic series and one that would be emotionally heartbreaking. From there the barrier of compassion is explored with a focus on the white nationalism and racism that accompanies the Minutemen and their militant border protection. That too could be a story by itself. And going even further the story then leads you to believe the barrier is one of language as the story of Liddy and Oscar collide. Their inability to communicate due to language is a barrier. And finally there’s… well, I’ll leave that twist to the reader.

But, what especially amazes me is that the story and presentation itself is a barrier in some ways to the reader. My Spanish is near non-existent so reading Oscar’s story is a barrier in some ways to me. The same could be said for those who only speak Spanish. What’s interesting is even without knowing what is said, I still understood what was going on and that’s due to the power of the art by Marcos Martin with color by Muntsa Vicente.

And Martin’s art too is a barrier in some ways. It’s brilliant in that it can tell the story without dialogue but in a landscape it creates a small barrier for those that have traditionally read comics. Digitally I didn’t notice this as much but in a physical format, the holding of the comic in a non-traditional, Western-standard way, is in itself a small barrier in how you interact. It’s an interesting choice that enhances the story in many ways and I found myself enjoying it even more as a physical product.

Barrier is unconventional in every way exploring violence, language, and immigration in a story that weaves together in an unexpected way. Writing this review I have the hindsight of have read the entire series digitally but rereading it all this time later, I can’t help be amazed at how good this is. Now, more individuals can read what is a comic that’s as timely today as when it was first released a year ago.

Story: Brian K. Vaughan Art: Marcos Martin Color: Muntsa Vicente
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

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