Tag Archives: black

Comic Book Creator Kwanza Osajyefo Brings His Talent to AfroComicCon

Kwanza Osajyefo

AfroComicCon has announced that comic book creator Kwanza Osajyefo will be among its Special Guests for their 2020 vitual convention!

Author and creator of BLACK, a comic that asks: what if only black people had superpowers. Kwanza has been a part of comics for nearly 20 years. Beginning his career as an online producer at Marvel before moving into other media roles. He later returned to comics and launched DC Comics’ digital publishing initiatives.

In addition to creating his own properties, Kwanza is also a creative architect of H1 Comics line from the premiere French publisher, Humanoids – co-writing their flagship title, Ignited, with comics legend, Mark Waid.


AfroComicCon​‘s 1st virtual convention will be held on October 24, 2020. Due to COVID-19 concerns, the annual event started in 2017 by the ​Oakland Technology & Education Center (OTEC), ​will be held virtually and free through a portal on the organization’s website. Sponsored by the NNPA, the ​Oakland A’s, and Pixar Entertainment, AfroComicCon promises to be a day full of exciting panels, screenings, entertainment, gaming, cosplay and special guests. The 12-hour event is currently slated to be live-streamed across multiple platforms including YouTube, Twitch, and Facebook. You can register now.

Warner Bros. Acquires Black to Adapt for Film

Black

Studio 8 has announced that Warner Bros. has acquired Black, the comic series co-created by Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3. Original artists and writers of the comic and its spinoffs include Jamal Igle, Khary Randolph, Jennifer Johnson, Vita Ayala, and Liana Kangas.

Bryan Edward Hill, who is a comic creator as well is a producer on DC’s Titans, wrote the script for the film.

In 2017 Studio 8 announced they had obtained the rights to the film with Seith Mann having originally been hired to write the script for the film in 2018.

The original Black comic series focused on Kareem Jenkins who survives being gunned down by police and joins an underground group of black superheroes learning about the world conspiracy that hides the revelations that black individuals have superpowers.

The series debuted with a teaser campaign at New York Comic Con in 2015 and went on to a Kickstarter campaign in 2016 that raised almost $92,000 from 2,775 backers. Since then, it’s resulted in numerous spin-off series featuring numerous writers and artists creating its own comic universe. The series was eventually released through comic publisher Black Mask Studios. A follow-up series, White, was Kickstarted in 2019 and went on to raise a little over $47,000 from 1,420 individuals. That series has seen release delays due to COVID.

Jeff Robinov, Guy Danella, and John Graham will produce from Studio 8 with Black Mask Studio’s Matteo Pizzolo and Brett Gurewitz to serve as producer and executive producer. Osajyefo and Smith are co-producers as well. The team is currently searching for a director.

Seith Mann Will Adapt the Comic Series Black

Seith Mann has been hired to adapt the comic series Black by Studio 8. The comic series exploresa world where only black people have superpowers.

The goal is to franchise the IP and develop the first spin-off comic Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart which focuses on one female lead as opposed to the original series’ ensemble cast.

The comic series is by co-creator/writer Kwanza Osajyefo, co-creator/designer Tim Smith 3, artist Jamal Igle and cover artist Khary Randolph. The series is published by Black Mask Studios. Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 are attached as co-producers, Matteo Pizzolo of Black Mask Studios is producing.

The original Black comic series focused on Kareem Jenkins who survives being gunned down by police and joins an underground group of black super heroes learning about the world conspiracy that hides the revelations that black individuals have super powers.

(via Deadline)

Black Gets Two Spin-Offs, Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart and Black [AF]: Widows & Orphans

Having taken the publishing industry by storm with a widely popular Kickstarter campaign for their acclaimed comic book, co-creators Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 are publishing two new titles set in the world of Black, their controversial comic that asks “in a world that already fears and hates them, what if only Black people had superpowers?” The progressive, Los Angeles-based indie publisher Black Mask Studios will publish both of these new projects in early 2018, the first of several planned Black spinoff titles.

On sale timed to Black History Month, the original graphic novel Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart introduces America’s first superhero, a black teenage girl. Though Eli Franklin’s friends and neighbors in rural Montana think of her as a typical 15-year-old, she just might be the most powerful person on the planet. The adopted daughter of a government official, Eli sets out to give America hope as its first superhero, Good Girl, but soon discovers it may take more than donning a patriotic costume to lessen societal divides. On sale in comic book stores on January 31 and in bookstores on February 13, Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart is a stand-alone YA story that updates classic superhero tropes (an adopted child manifests incredible powers of super strength, invulnerability, and flight) to tell a bold, thrilling, and timely origin story for a new generation. Artist Jennifer Johnson makes her graphic novel debut.

Following the publication of Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart, Black Mask Studios will publish the miniseries Black [AF]: Widows & Orphans starting in April. The four-issue series will reunite Black co-creators Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3, with Osajyefo  writing the series and Smith illustrating it. The series highlights Anansi, one of the characters introduced in Black, and marks the first Black series to be illustrated by Smith, who designed the characters that Jamal Igle illustrated in the first Black comics.

More Black titles are in development from the co-creators and Black Mask Studios.

BLACK AF: AMERICA’S SWEETHEART
written by Kwanza Osajyefo; illustrated by Jennifer Johnson
$9.99; 80 pages; Full Color
On sale: in comic book stores on January 31 and in bookstores on February 14, 2018

BLACK [AF]: WIDOWS & ORPHANS #1
written by Kwanza Osajyefo; illustrated by TIM SMITH 3
$3.99; 32 pages; Full Color;  Mature
On Sale: April 2018

Black is Optioned for the Big Screen by Studio 8

Deadline is reporting that Studio 8 has snatched up the Kickstarter smashing indie comic series Black created by Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3, written by Osajyefo, with art by Jamal Igle, covers by Khary Randolph, and published by Black Mask Studios. The plan currently is to bring the series to the big screen.

The six issue series has recently wrapped up and is about a world where only Black individuals have superpowers and a widespread global conspiracy about that knowledge pervails. The story primarily follows a young man who survives being gunned down by police and is brought into the conspiracy forcing him to decide if he’ll keep it a secret or the truth will set him free.

Osajyefo and Smith are attached as co-producers to the film, with Black Mask Studios’ Matteo Pizzolo producing.

This isn’t the first comic property for Studio 8, they aquired film options for Scout by Timothy Truman.

Around the Tubes

The weekend is almost here. What geeky things will folks be doing? Sound off in the comments. While you decide on all of that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Kotaku – Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite Wants Even Newbies To Have A Blast – Who’s excited for this?

The Verge – How Wonder Woman’s iconic features turned her into a progressive icon – Some interesting history here.

ICv2 – ‘The Tick’ Comics Return – This could be really cool.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Batman News – Batgirl #10

Comic Attack – Black #5

Talking Comics – The Flash #21

Review: Black #5

In the aftermath of his defection from The Project, Kareem comes face-to-face with the harsh consequences of his decision. Juncture and his team enlist Detective Waters’s help in a drastic effort to find the boy before he’s too far gone into the system – but a great threat may have nefarious designs for Kareem’s unique abilities.

In Black #5, it feels everything is finally laid out for us readers to fully understand what’s going on. Up until this point I wasn’t completely sold as to who could be trust and who couldn’t and at the end of this issue, I’m still not 100%, but there’s some interesting twists and turns throughout.

The issue focuses on Kareem and The Project also trying to figure out what happened to him. While the story at its heart isn’t completely unique (a person with great power who uncontrolled could destroy the world) what Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 bring in the story is how that type of story has a layered meaning when the skin color changes from white to black.

The strongest thing about Black isn’t so much what it’s trying to say or the overall story, but getting the reader to see how the meaning and themes of stories change when the skin color of the main character is changed. To me, that’s the thing I’m most enjoying about it and its getting me to think about the other comics I’m consuming and how a simple change of a character’s skin color can completely change the “meaning” of a scene or series. What Black also does well as shown in this issue is take the real world events and bring them into the comic. The divide in how White America and Back America are treated is brought up as well as coded wording used to dehumanize Black individuals. It’s not overtly in your face, but natural dialogue that adds to the overarching story and its themes.

The art by Jamal Igle is solid delivering black and white action (no pun intended) and the varying characters. There’s little cut and paste here (the only example is generic soldiers in armor) instead every character has a unique look and style of their own that stands out and brings them life. As always, Khary Randolph’s covers draw you in. These are some of the best, most striking covers on the shelves.

The series has had its ups and downs, but the story as a whole is amazing in its themes and what it says. Each issue feels like it adds depth when it comes to that getting the readers to think not just about the current issue, but the past ones as well. Black is an entertaining read and one that challenges the reader to think and explore beyond the page.

Story: Kwanza Osajyefo, Tim Smith 3 Art: Jamal Igle Cover Art: Khary Randolph
Story: 7.85 Art: 7.85 Overall: 7.85 Recommendation: Read

Preview: Black #5

BLACK #5

Created by: Kwanza Osajyefo & Tim Smith 3
Written by: Kwanza Osajyefo
Illustrated by: Jamal Igle
Cover by: Khary Randolph
In Stores: April 19

In the aftermath of his defection from The Project, Kareem comes face-to-face with the harsh consequences of his decision. Juncture and his team enlist Detective Waters’ help in a drastic effort to find the boy before he’s too far gone into the system – but a great threat may have nefarious designs for Kareem’s unique abilities.

Preview: Black #4

Black #4

Created by: Kwanza Osajyefo & Tim Smith 3
Written by: Kwanza Osajyefo
Illustrated by: Jamal Igle
Cover by: Khary Randolph
In Stores: February 8

A schism between Juncture and Kareem sets the young man on the run from the people he thought were his comrades. Traversing the depths of the Project, he searches for answers he can’t get from Juncture – will he find what he’s looking for or will his discovery put everyone in danger?

black-4-7

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

black-history-month-in-its-own-wordsWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Ben

Black History In Its Own Words (Image Comics) – Criminally, I’m behind on Ronald Wimberly’s work, despite the fact that his recent Image Comics work, Prince of Cats (once a publication of Vertigo), has been making waves with its unique premise and gorgeous art. Black History In Its Own Words sounds like a great endeavor in the same effort as March, using the comics medium as a way to educate on important moments and figures in black history. We already know comics can be art, can be literature, but what about educational? Comics can be a teaching tool for reading and drawing, so it only makes sense it should take the next step in teaching all too important academia such as history, science, math, government, etc.

All-New Wolverine #17 (Marvel) – I’ve only read the first volume so far, but X-23 as the All-New Wolverine has one me over. She continues on the powerful themes of the original character, dealing with anger and finding more meaning in life than violence, while exploring her own unique personality. Most superhero comics have overdone action to the point that it’s no longer fun, but the creative team here manages to keep it so while not forgetting character development. Definitely one of the best among new Marvel titles.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Inhumans vs. X-Men #4 (Marvel) – This event has been a rock ’em sock ’em ride from the get go.  The X-Men are fighting for their survival and they are definitely not holding back.  The action has been non stop as the X-Men have taken out the Inhuman’s heavy hitters, but they may have underestimated the Nuhumans and their ability to push back. It’s only going to get more cut throat as this goes on and I can’t wait to see where this goes.

Jessica Jones #5 (Marvel) – When I started reading this title, I was a little annoyed that Marvel took Jessica back to her “darker” self, after everything that was established with her and Luke Cage.  But I have bee enjoying this title, and the last issue definitely cleared some things up for me.  I’m liking the set up of the “big bad” in this title and I am curious to see what the end game is.  I very good title that I recommend.

The Unworthy Thor #4 (Marvel) – Odinson is held prisoner on the Collector’s ship; a strange hammer within his reach, but the Collector wants the power for himself.  And to make matters worse, Proxima Midnight and Black Swan have crashed the party.  I’ve been enjoying this book, but really just want to see Odinson get his hands on this hammer already!

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – I’ll be honest, the Rebirth titles I was reading didn’t hold my interest (though I do want to go back to Red Hood, Birds of Prey and Teen Titans as I lost track of them) but I am intrigued by the team line up of this book.  I read the Rebirth stories for The Ray and Killer Frost, which I enjoyed, and Black Canary and Vixen are favorites of mine, so I’m hoping this book can deliver.

 

Joe

Top Pick: Kingpin #1 (Marvel) – Matt Rosenberg has been of the best and most consistent writers lately. He has done some fantastic miniseries, and we get him on a big Marvel ongoing. Finally! With how he wrote the character on the CW2 miniseries, and it being the best thing to happen to that event, my expectations are through the roof for this book. Be excited.

Moonshine #5 (Image Comics) – This has been a solid and underrated book by Azzarello about mobsters, Appalachia, and werewolves. It is such an original tale that has packed an intriguing mystery about city slickers coming to the mountains with booze and blood involved.

Detective Comics #950 (DC Comics) – The oversized anniversary special that is priced at $3.99, that is a beautiful concept everyone should follow. I love this series, and James Tynion IV hasn’t let me down yet. I don’t expect him to anytime soon.

The Unworthy Thor #4 (Marvel) – It’s been so far so good for the return of Jason Aaron writing Odinson, and there’s only a few issues remaining. Will Thor get his original hammer? Or at least the ultimate version? Will he ride off into the sunset and allow Jane to remain the God of Thunder? I suspect a new ongoing. I can’t wait to find out.

The Flash #16 (DC Comics) – Finally the Rogues have returned! Josh Williamson has done a solid job with this series, but now that the Rogues have returned, it’s getting even better.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Ninjak #24 (Valiant) – This is the first time that Ninjak has been my top pick in a long time, if ever. Matt Kindt has always been consistent with his writing on the series, but with the last issue he kicked it up a gear, and I can’t wait to see where he takes us with this issue.

All-Star Batman #7 (DC Comics) – Scott Snyder and Jock gave me Batman #44, which remains one of the best issues of Batman I have ever read. Needless to say, I’m excited to get a whole story from these two.

Divinity III: Shadowman #1 (Valiant) – Honestly, this was a toss up between this and Detective Comics #950, with this issue coming out on top because of it’s relation to the main Divinity III miniseries. The more content  I can get from the Stalinverse, the happier I am.

Red Hood And The Outlaws #7 (DC Comics) – An unsung gem in DC’s line up, this darkly funny (whether it’s supposed to be or not) series has become one of the ones I look forward to the most each month.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Black History In Its Own Words (Image Comics) – Ron Wimberly takes us through a look at Black History framed by those who made it. As a white guy with a large gap in my knowledge, I’m looking forward to filling in some of that.

Black #4 (Black Mask Studios) – The series has been an interesting one, and while not perfect, each issue has been thought provoking with a depth not usually found in superhero comics.

Death Be Damned #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Seven outlaws have killed Miranda Coler and her family, but her death turned out to be a little less permanent than they expected. A western tale of revenge is exactly what I’ve been looking for.

Divinity III: Shadowman #1 (Valiant) – This latest “event” miniseries from Valiant has been absolutely amazing. Any opportunity to get more about this world, I’m excited.

The Fissure #1 (Vault Comics) – El Sueño, Texas was a single street town withering under the shadow of the Mexico-U.S. Barrier. Then the pavement split, and a massive crack spread from one end to the other, rapidly swallowing El Sueño whole. Young couple Avery Lee Olmos and Hark Wright fight to escape the mysterious sinkhole and the malevolent force that beckons from its depths. Writer Tim Daniel has kicked ass with these types of stories and this debut from Vault Comics is one I’ve had my eye on for quite some time.

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