Tag Archives: black

Seith Mann Will Adapt the Comic Series Black

Seith Mann has been hired to adapt the comic series Black by Studio 8. The comic series exploresa world where only black people have superpowers.

The goal is to franchise the IP and develop the first spin-off comic Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart which focuses on one female lead as opposed to the original series’ ensemble cast.

The comic series is by co-creator/writer Kwanza Osajyefo, co-creator/designer Tim Smith 3, artist Jamal Igle and cover artist Khary Randolph. The series is published by Black Mask Studios. Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 are attached as co-producers, Matteo Pizzolo of Black Mask Studios is producing.

The original Black comic series focused on Kareem Jenkins who survives being gunned down by police and joins an underground group of black super heroes learning about the world conspiracy that hides the revelations that black individuals have super powers.

(via Deadline)

Black Gets Two Spin-Offs, Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart and Black [AF]: Widows & Orphans

Having taken the publishing industry by storm with a widely popular Kickstarter campaign for their acclaimed comic book, co-creators Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 are publishing two new titles set in the world of Black, their controversial comic that asks “in a world that already fears and hates them, what if only Black people had superpowers?” The progressive, Los Angeles-based indie publisher Black Mask Studios will publish both of these new projects in early 2018, the first of several planned Black spinoff titles.

On sale timed to Black History Month, the original graphic novel Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart introduces America’s first superhero, a black teenage girl. Though Eli Franklin’s friends and neighbors in rural Montana think of her as a typical 15-year-old, she just might be the most powerful person on the planet. The adopted daughter of a government official, Eli sets out to give America hope as its first superhero, Good Girl, but soon discovers it may take more than donning a patriotic costume to lessen societal divides. On sale in comic book stores on January 31 and in bookstores on February 13, Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart is a stand-alone YA story that updates classic superhero tropes (an adopted child manifests incredible powers of super strength, invulnerability, and flight) to tell a bold, thrilling, and timely origin story for a new generation. Artist Jennifer Johnson makes her graphic novel debut.

Following the publication of Black [AF]: America’s Sweetheart, Black Mask Studios will publish the miniseries Black [AF]: Widows & Orphans starting in April. The four-issue series will reunite Black co-creators Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3, with Osajyefo  writing the series and Smith illustrating it. The series highlights Anansi, one of the characters introduced in Black, and marks the first Black series to be illustrated by Smith, who designed the characters that Jamal Igle illustrated in the first Black comics.

More Black titles are in development from the co-creators and Black Mask Studios.

BLACK AF: AMERICA’S SWEETHEART
written by Kwanza Osajyefo; illustrated by Jennifer Johnson
$9.99; 80 pages; Full Color
On sale: in comic book stores on January 31 and in bookstores on February 14, 2018

BLACK [AF]: WIDOWS & ORPHANS #1
written by Kwanza Osajyefo; illustrated by TIM SMITH 3
$3.99; 32 pages; Full Color;  Mature
On Sale: April 2018

Black is Optioned for the Big Screen by Studio 8

Deadline is reporting that Studio 8 has snatched up the Kickstarter smashing indie comic series Black created by Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3, written by Osajyefo, with art by Jamal Igle, covers by Khary Randolph, and published by Black Mask Studios. The plan currently is to bring the series to the big screen.

The six issue series has recently wrapped up and is about a world where only Black individuals have superpowers and a widespread global conspiracy about that knowledge pervails. The story primarily follows a young man who survives being gunned down by police and is brought into the conspiracy forcing him to decide if he’ll keep it a secret or the truth will set him free.

Osajyefo and Smith are attached as co-producers to the film, with Black Mask Studios’ Matteo Pizzolo producing.

This isn’t the first comic property for Studio 8, they aquired film options for Scout by Timothy Truman.

Around the Tubes

The weekend is almost here. What geeky things will folks be doing? Sound off in the comments. While you decide on all of that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Around the Tubes

Kotaku – Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite Wants Even Newbies To Have A Blast – Who’s excited for this?

The Verge – How Wonder Woman’s iconic features turned her into a progressive icon – Some interesting history here.

ICv2 – ‘The Tick’ Comics Return – This could be really cool.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Batman News – Batgirl #10

Comic Attack – Black #5

Talking Comics – The Flash #21

Review: Black #5

In the aftermath of his defection from The Project, Kareem comes face-to-face with the harsh consequences of his decision. Juncture and his team enlist Detective Waters’s help in a drastic effort to find the boy before he’s too far gone into the system – but a great threat may have nefarious designs for Kareem’s unique abilities.

In Black #5, it feels everything is finally laid out for us readers to fully understand what’s going on. Up until this point I wasn’t completely sold as to who could be trust and who couldn’t and at the end of this issue, I’m still not 100%, but there’s some interesting twists and turns throughout.

The issue focuses on Kareem and The Project also trying to figure out what happened to him. While the story at its heart isn’t completely unique (a person with great power who uncontrolled could destroy the world) what Kwanza Osajyefo and Tim Smith 3 bring in the story is how that type of story has a layered meaning when the skin color changes from white to black.

The strongest thing about Black isn’t so much what it’s trying to say or the overall story, but getting the reader to see how the meaning and themes of stories change when the skin color of the main character is changed. To me, that’s the thing I’m most enjoying about it and its getting me to think about the other comics I’m consuming and how a simple change of a character’s skin color can completely change the “meaning” of a scene or series. What Black also does well as shown in this issue is take the real world events and bring them into the comic. The divide in how White America and Back America are treated is brought up as well as coded wording used to dehumanize Black individuals. It’s not overtly in your face, but natural dialogue that adds to the overarching story and its themes.

The art by Jamal Igle is solid delivering black and white action (no pun intended) and the varying characters. There’s little cut and paste here (the only example is generic soldiers in armor) instead every character has a unique look and style of their own that stands out and brings them life. As always, Khary Randolph’s covers draw you in. These are some of the best, most striking covers on the shelves.

The series has had its ups and downs, but the story as a whole is amazing in its themes and what it says. Each issue feels like it adds depth when it comes to that getting the readers to think not just about the current issue, but the past ones as well. Black is an entertaining read and one that challenges the reader to think and explore beyond the page.

Story: Kwanza Osajyefo, Tim Smith 3 Art: Jamal Igle Cover Art: Khary Randolph
Story: 7.85 Art: 7.85 Overall: 7.85 Recommendation: Read

Preview: Black #5

BLACK #5

Created by: Kwanza Osajyefo & Tim Smith 3
Written by: Kwanza Osajyefo
Illustrated by: Jamal Igle
Cover by: Khary Randolph
In Stores: April 19

In the aftermath of his defection from The Project, Kareem comes face-to-face with the harsh consequences of his decision. Juncture and his team enlist Detective Waters’ help in a drastic effort to find the boy before he’s too far gone into the system – but a great threat may have nefarious designs for Kareem’s unique abilities.

Preview: Black #4

Black #4

Created by: Kwanza Osajyefo & Tim Smith 3
Written by: Kwanza Osajyefo
Illustrated by: Jamal Igle
Cover by: Khary Randolph
In Stores: February 8

A schism between Juncture and Kareem sets the young man on the run from the people he thought were his comrades. Traversing the depths of the Project, he searches for answers he can’t get from Juncture – will he find what he’s looking for or will his discovery put everyone in danger?

black-4-7

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

black-history-month-in-its-own-wordsWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Ben

Black History In Its Own Words (Image Comics) – Criminally, I’m behind on Ronald Wimberly’s work, despite the fact that his recent Image Comics work, Prince of Cats (once a publication of Vertigo), has been making waves with its unique premise and gorgeous art. Black History In Its Own Words sounds like a great endeavor in the same effort as March, using the comics medium as a way to educate on important moments and figures in black history. We already know comics can be art, can be literature, but what about educational? Comics can be a teaching tool for reading and drawing, so it only makes sense it should take the next step in teaching all too important academia such as history, science, math, government, etc.

All-New Wolverine #17 (Marvel) – I’ve only read the first volume so far, but X-23 as the All-New Wolverine has one me over. She continues on the powerful themes of the original character, dealing with anger and finding more meaning in life than violence, while exploring her own unique personality. Most superhero comics have overdone action to the point that it’s no longer fun, but the creative team here manages to keep it so while not forgetting character development. Definitely one of the best among new Marvel titles.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Inhumans vs. X-Men #4 (Marvel) – This event has been a rock ’em sock ’em ride from the get go.  The X-Men are fighting for their survival and they are definitely not holding back.  The action has been non stop as the X-Men have taken out the Inhuman’s heavy hitters, but they may have underestimated the Nuhumans and their ability to push back. It’s only going to get more cut throat as this goes on and I can’t wait to see where this goes.

Jessica Jones #5 (Marvel) – When I started reading this title, I was a little annoyed that Marvel took Jessica back to her “darker” self, after everything that was established with her and Luke Cage.  But I have bee enjoying this title, and the last issue definitely cleared some things up for me.  I’m liking the set up of the “big bad” in this title and I am curious to see what the end game is.  I very good title that I recommend.

The Unworthy Thor #4 (Marvel) – Odinson is held prisoner on the Collector’s ship; a strange hammer within his reach, but the Collector wants the power for himself.  And to make matters worse, Proxima Midnight and Black Swan have crashed the party.  I’ve been enjoying this book, but really just want to see Odinson get his hands on this hammer already!

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – I’ll be honest, the Rebirth titles I was reading didn’t hold my interest (though I do want to go back to Red Hood, Birds of Prey and Teen Titans as I lost track of them) but I am intrigued by the team line up of this book.  I read the Rebirth stories for The Ray and Killer Frost, which I enjoyed, and Black Canary and Vixen are favorites of mine, so I’m hoping this book can deliver.

 

Joe

Top Pick: Kingpin #1 (Marvel) – Matt Rosenberg has been of the best and most consistent writers lately. He has done some fantastic miniseries, and we get him on a big Marvel ongoing. Finally! With how he wrote the character on the CW2 miniseries, and it being the best thing to happen to that event, my expectations are through the roof for this book. Be excited.

Moonshine #5 (Image Comics) – This has been a solid and underrated book by Azzarello about mobsters, Appalachia, and werewolves. It is such an original tale that has packed an intriguing mystery about city slickers coming to the mountains with booze and blood involved.

Detective Comics #950 (DC Comics) – The oversized anniversary special that is priced at $3.99, that is a beautiful concept everyone should follow. I love this series, and James Tynion IV hasn’t let me down yet. I don’t expect him to anytime soon.

The Unworthy Thor #4 (Marvel) – It’s been so far so good for the return of Jason Aaron writing Odinson, and there’s only a few issues remaining. Will Thor get his original hammer? Or at least the ultimate version? Will he ride off into the sunset and allow Jane to remain the God of Thunder? I suspect a new ongoing. I can’t wait to find out.

The Flash #16 (DC Comics) – Finally the Rogues have returned! Josh Williamson has done a solid job with this series, but now that the Rogues have returned, it’s getting even better.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Ninjak #24 (Valiant) – This is the first time that Ninjak has been my top pick in a long time, if ever. Matt Kindt has always been consistent with his writing on the series, but with the last issue he kicked it up a gear, and I can’t wait to see where he takes us with this issue.

All-Star Batman #7 (DC Comics) – Scott Snyder and Jock gave me Batman #44, which remains one of the best issues of Batman I have ever read. Needless to say, I’m excited to get a whole story from these two.

Divinity III: Shadowman #1 (Valiant) – Honestly, this was a toss up between this and Detective Comics #950, with this issue coming out on top because of it’s relation to the main Divinity III miniseries. The more content  I can get from the Stalinverse, the happier I am.

Red Hood And The Outlaws #7 (DC Comics) – An unsung gem in DC’s line up, this darkly funny (whether it’s supposed to be or not) series has become one of the ones I look forward to the most each month.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Black History In Its Own Words (Image Comics) – Ron Wimberly takes us through a look at Black History framed by those who made it. As a white guy with a large gap in my knowledge, I’m looking forward to filling in some of that.

Black #4 (Black Mask Studios) – The series has been an interesting one, and while not perfect, each issue has been thought provoking with a depth not usually found in superhero comics.

Death Be Damned #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Seven outlaws have killed Miranda Coler and her family, but her death turned out to be a little less permanent than they expected. A western tale of revenge is exactly what I’ve been looking for.

Divinity III: Shadowman #1 (Valiant) – This latest “event” miniseries from Valiant has been absolutely amazing. Any opportunity to get more about this world, I’m excited.

The Fissure #1 (Vault Comics) – El Sueño, Texas was a single street town withering under the shadow of the Mexico-U.S. Barrier. Then the pavement split, and a massive crack spread from one end to the other, rapidly swallowing El Sueño whole. Young couple Avery Lee Olmos and Hark Wright fight to escape the mysterious sinkhole and the malevolent force that beckons from its depths. Writer Tim Daniel has kicked ass with these types of stories and this debut from Vault Comics is one I’ve had my eye on for quite some time.

The Best Comics of 2016 – Brett’s List

It’s the first day of a new year and so that means I’m posting my “best of” listing of the top comic books for 2016. Generally these are comic books that came out in 2016, though some are from earlier times and I got around to reading them, or limited series that continued. Keep in mind, this is what I have read (and does not reflect what other contributors to this site might think, they’ll hopefully have their own lists). If it’s not on here, I just might not have read it.

This was a particularly tough year of choices with some categories easily having their own top ten or twenty-five and some I struggled to even come up with one. 2016 was a year that ongoing, maxi-series, and limited floppies seemed to blend more and more and for me as a reader I found myself shifting away from one publisher to another and as a whole enjoying graphic novels and indie comics a hell of a lot more than I have in the past.

What stood out to me? Check out below what made the cut!

Best Super Hero Comic – The Paybacks

the-paybacks-3A new publisher, but still absolutely amazing. The Paybacks by Donny Cates, Eliot Rahal, Geoff Shaw moved from Dark Horse to Heavy Metal for its second volume, but it didn’t lose any steam in doing so continuing to deliver hilarity and upping the action.

The concept of the comic is that there’s a repo crew who have to deal with all the superheroes who can’t pay back the loans they take for all of their fancy gadgets. To pay off their debts those heroes then join the ragtag team.

A send-up of so many familiar characters and lets face it creators too, the comic has more jokes in each panel than some series have their entire run. It’s funny, action packed, and in this volume actually is somewhat timely with news with a focus on a data breach.

My biggest wish in comics for 2017 is someone is smart enough to invest in this series because I know it’ll pay off in the log run. Everyone who I’ve turned on to it falls in love and whole there were some issues with the second volume, it still is the one “superhero” comic I devoured as soon as possible.

Runners Up:

  • COPRA – There’s some arguments to be made that Michel Fiffe‘s indie series about a group of raftag characters should be the top pick, and there was long thought about if it should, it’s that good. Out of all of the series I read this year, this is one that delivered with every single issue. This is a comic that shows that superheroes aren’t the domain of just two companies anymore, especially due to how many issues have been released. I said this exact same thing in 2015 and it applies here.
  • The Legend of Wonder Woman – An absolutely brilliant max-series that went from digital to print. Renae De Liz and Ray Dillon delivered a Wonder Woman story that stands out in a year of solid Wonder Woman output. Fun to read. Beautiful to look at. Unfortunately, it looks like we’ll just get this one volume.
  • The Omega Men – Writer Tom King took this ragtag group of characters and has given us a maxiseries that explores revolution/terrorism in so many ways. This is one to read once collected and the ruminate on. It began in 2015 but wrapped up in 2016.
  • Tomboy – This series published by Action Lab: Danger Zone and by M. Goodwin is a comic that’s not on enough people’s radar. A mix of manga, Japanese horror, western vigilante stories, it’s a strange, creepy, haunting series featuring a teenage girl out for revenge against the people who killed her friend.

 

Best Non-Super Hero Comic – The Sheriff of Babylon

the-sheriff-of-babylon-12-coverI said above that 2016 was the year of Tom King, and guess who wrote this one! Tom King! The Sheriff of Babylon is another max-series that wrapped up, but we’ll get a second volume some time in 2017.

The comic is based on King’s experiences working for the CIA in Iraq taking place in the Green Zone after the recent Iraq war. The comic is brutally honest showing a world where there’s so little right and so much wrong and it all comes together in a muddied brown and gray.

That dirtiness of it all is helped by Mitch Gerads‘ art and the smart use of colors. The detail, every body movement, the framing of the panels, Gerads’ art adds so much to every issue. That’s saying something considering how amazing King’s scripts are!

This is a comic series that shows comics are political and can question the world we currently live.

Runners Ups:

  • Descender- Jeff Lemire has had a hell of year in general in comics and is one of my favorite writers of the year. This series features the stunning art of Dustin Nguyen. The sci-fi series is so hard to describe revolving around an android that looks like a little boy. Every issue is a treat to read, and Nguyen’s art helps with beautiful visuals. Seriously the art alone is a reason to pick up the series. We didn’t get an issue every month, but what we did get was fantastic.
  • The Fix – Two fuck up cops who are corrupt and get mixed up in a drug smuggling scam. The comic is absolutely hilarious. Written by Nick Spencer with art by Steve Lieber the comic is one of the funniest books on the market.
  • The Flintstones – Written by Mark Russell this series is some of the smartest and subtle political and social commentary in any writing going on today. The comic covers everything from religion to consumerism to the 2016 election. And like his writing in Prez no one is safe, the right and the left are equal fodder. Entertaining, smart, and elevating the classic characters to a whole new level.
  • Invisible Republic – A reporter investigates the truth of an uprising on a planet discovering fact from fiction in a series that bounces back and forth between the past and present. Each issue reminds us about the power of journalism and the need for good reporting. Myth can easily be twisted into fact and lies can replace reality. The comic series seems prescient in so many ways.

 

Best Limited Series or One Shot – 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank

4 KIDS WALK INTO A BANK #1 CoverWe got three issues of this series in 2016 and holy crap do I wish we got more. In those three issues we did get some of the best storytelling in any comics. I’m assuming this is a limited series since it is a “crime caper in five parts” but hopefully we get more after this volume wraps up.

The series involves a bunch of kids that find out one of their dads is possibly a criminal and has some buddies who plan to rob a bank. Their idea is to rob the bank before them.

But, it’s not the heist that’s the drawn it’s the kids themselves. Each one feels so real with so many quirks their personalities jump off the page. Everyone is relatable and each feels like real people we knew growing up. It’s absolutely amazing.

The art by Tyler Boss is top notch and the writing is why Matthew Rosenberg is one of the hottest writers in comics right now.

More please!

Runners Up:

  • Black – This series was a Kickstarter phenomenon and the concept is what if only Black people had superpowers? Political. Daring. In your face. The comic is layered and will leave you debating what it’s trying to say.
  • Love is Love – A charity comic to benefit the victims of the Pulse nightclub attack, this comic is a prime example of what the comic industry can do when profits aren’t at the forefront. Bringing together publishers and hundreds of creators it’s a touching tribute.
  • Refugees Book One – A hell of a find at Small Press Expo, the comic is haunting taking us into the world of refugees as they attempt to find a better life. There’s definite issues with the comic as far as some of the writing, but the message is clear and brutally honest.
  • Superman: American Alien – Featuring a bunch of different artists, this maxi-series by writer Max Landis explored a different time in Superman’s life with a different take on the character. It’s a fun and fantastic read and somehow actually gives us something that feels fresh for a character that’s been around for over 75 years.

 

Best Graphic Novel/Trade Paperback – March Book Three

MarchBookThree-CoverThe best thing to be released in 2016 for comics. This is an absolutely amazing finish to the award winning trilogy. The winner of the National Book Award among other things the graphic novel focuses on Congressman John Lewis’ experiences during the Civil Rights movement.

Written by Lewis, Andrew Aydin, with art by Nate Powell this is the crown jewel of comics showing that they’re more than tights and has been adopted by schools to teach about this time in American history.

As I read the graphic novel from cover to cover, I found myself filled with emotions, as Lewis’ life was there in print for those to see and read. The story is a complicated one, but it’s presented in a way that feels honest and open, both good and bad. This is an inside look at one of the most important, and turbulent times in American history from not just someone that was there, but a leader of the movement. And that’s a fascinating part of this third book, is its focus on Lewis’ role as a leader.

This third volume somehow leapfrogs the other two. Whether it’s due to learning or the material within, something about it created an emotional reaction I haven’t felt by any media in quite some time. And most importantly it got me to think about where we as a people and nation have been, where we are, and where we’re going.

Runners Up:

  • The Attack – A man’s wife winds up being a suicide bomber. This story is about his attempt to find out why and discovering he knew so little about the woman he called his wife. A spiral into despair and madness the end will leave you speechless and heartbroken.
  • Rolling Blackouts: Dispatches From Turkey, Syria, and Iraq – By Sarah Glidden this graphic novel is her experiences as she researches potential stories on the effects of the Iraq War on the Middle East, especially refugees. Beautiful to look at, the graphic novel is the second best thing I’ve read this year (behind March).
  • Soviet Daughter – Adapting her great grandmother’s journal Julia Alekseyeva provides an interesting look at someone who lived in Russia from 1910 to emigrating to the US in the 90s. The Revolution, WWII, the Holocaust, it’s all presented as Alekseyeva illustrates what is a diary. Between each chapter, Julia reflects on her own life and her closeness with her great grandmother. It’s an amazing piece examining women finding their place in the world. It’s also a reason you wait until the first of the year for your list, as this came out the last week of the year.
  • Tetris: The Games People PlayBox Brown takes what should be a boring story about the history of the video game Tetris and makes it really interesting! A fun graphic novel published by First Second that makes corporate maneuvering a bad business deals engaging.

 

Best Genre of the Year – Indie Comics/Small Publishers

Is it a “genre”? We can argue about that, but lets face it, 2016 was a year we saw major creators continue to shrug off the big two, instead launching creator-owned series at other publishers, digitally or through Kickstarter. We saw more comics, in more varieties, on more subjects and more ways to consume them, than any time before. It really wasn’t the year of the Big Two, this was a year that we as consumers could continue to find something that would fit our varied tastes.

With more channels for distribution and more ways to produce comics, we’re in a golden age where the old ways of publishing no longer hold back the creativity that abounds.

I named Indie Comics “it” in 2013, 2014, and 2015 and nothing changed in 2016. There’s a massive opening for someone to step in and be a mainstream breakout, maybe 2017 will be the year we see it.

 

Best Surprise of the Year – DC Comics

DC_Logo_RGB_0318162016 was a year that had everyone shaking their head when they heard DC was shaking things up again and “rebooting.” Except, their reboot was anything but.

In “Rebirth” the publisher blended the old with the new bringing back legacy characters and also pushing forward some of the newer ones too. They even moved away from grimm and gritty and gave us a bit of hope and fun in it all!

While Batman has always been strong for the company, Superman, Wonder Woman, and more all all returned to greatness with a new positive energy about them that could be felt.

But even better, sales increased and while they’ve leveled off and dropped quite a bit from the initial launch, the publisher is stronger and in a better position than it has been in a long time.

The company continued to expand upon its digital first program, and has begun to look towards expanding its market with its DC Super Hero Girls line.

They also did this as their movie output was mixed and television output strong. Now to get everything to line-up and the DC brand as a whole could be unstoppable.

The dots are all there, now we’ll see if the company has the vision to connect them all.

 

Biggest Disappointment of the Year – Kickstarter

KickstarterLast year’s disappointment continued to be so, as projects were delayed, vapor ware, or not as advertised. Also add in issues on the creator end of folks pledging high amounts and then disputing the charges, at times getting the goods. Add in the platform’s unwillingness to step in to deal with either situation and you get a tech company showing off it’s greed. What was once the toast of the town has shown its cracks which will only get worse.

The crowdfunding platform became a way for creators to raise funds for projects, only to get picked up by publishers, at times delaying projects and leaving bad tastes in the mouths of fans. If all creators were held to the standards of some of the best users of the system, there’d be no issue, but over 90% of the projects I’ve pledged to have been delayed or non-existent only creating angry backers and fans.

These issues have lead this site to rethink what we promote and how we do so, no longer choosing comics to promote, as we feel some responsibility for things gone wrong and your dollars being held hostage.

Kickstarter continues to be tone-deaf, and it’s only a matter of time before someone stands up and challenges the platform with a system that’s fair to creators, and protects those who pledge.

Oh how the mighty continue to fall.

 

Publisher of the Year – None of the Above

This one I’ve thought about the most out of all of the categories on the list. I keep going back and forth between Image, BOOM! Studios, Valiant, Action Lab, IDW, First Second, and so many more. For each strength one brings to the table, they also have major weaknesses. Whether it’s a focus on a genre, pigeonholing themselves with adults, failure in digital, a mix of quality of comics, none of them are at least good everywhere. But, the comic industry has really grown in 2016 with no one breaking out as THE publisher to rival the big two. Partially that’s because so many have stood out with some of what they’ve done, but none have stood out for their whole.

Of the big two Marvel has stumbled… a lot. Entire articles can be written in that department, but the company is not the juggernaut its been in quite some time and I’d expect their to be some big shake-ups in 2017.

DC on the other hand came really close to being named for this. They’ve done some amazing stuff in the year with Rebirth being a smash hit. There’s still something slightly off, but out of every publisher, they’ve gotten most improved.

Image has become of the home of amazing indie comics by big name creators, but they generally lack a kids line that gets the next generation of readers and the sales just aren’t their in floppies. BOOM! has had a great mix of comics, but they’re missing that ongoing series that goes on for 30 to 50 issues. Valiant is quality all around and have tried some interesting market tactics, but you have to like superhero comics, Action Lab is a solid up and comer with good consistent releases. IDW has shown its possible to do great licensed comics, while First Second has fantastic graphic novels of all sorts. Aftershock has quality and so has Black Mak Studios.

Out of all of that, where’s the standout above everyone else? They’re all good in their own ways, but each have some flaws, with some of those flaws being pretty big. After a lot of deliberation, I couldn’t decide on one, so I chose none.

Each publisher is close to going huge, it’s just taking someone to connect those dots. Or maybe no one will, and it’ll be up to the individual creators to fill up the gap.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

black-3-cover-1Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Action Comics #969 (DC Comics) – I am blown away by this comic, and how well Dan Jurgens is juggling everything. Doomsday and Superman fighting again. Mr. Oz. Super Lex. Creepy Clark Kent. The aliens that have come after Lex, and so much more. This is one of my favorite series and I have not been disappointed by a single issue. I am very excited to find out what the hell is going on with Clark, though I doubt I get that answer in this issue.

Wonder Woman #12 (DC Comics) – I have said it before. This is DC’s most consistent book, and it just gets better with each issue. Rucka is doing such a phenomenal job here, and I get impatient waiting for the next issue on both of the storylines (and they come out every two weeks!). This is a series everyone should be reading.

Reborn #3 (Image) – The first issue was amazing, and the second issue grew the world a little more and was still fantastic. Now that we’ve met our big bad, and Bonnie’s former cat who is now an evil General (because of a bad trip to the vet), our characters are preparing to go to war. Who else will appear from Bonnie’s past?

Inhumans vs. X-Men #1 (Marvel) – I am mostly excited about this because Death of X left a bad taste in my mouth (I did not mind the twist ending, but mostly the event was unnecessary). I have my doubts about this event, and I wonder if it is even necessary, but I do like Lemire and Soule, and I hope they give us something good here, and this isn’t just filler before the new spring books for the Inhumans and X-Men.

 

Shay

Top Pick: Suicide Squad #8 (DC Comics) – General Zod and the Black Vault have gotten everyone going crazy at Belle Reve except for Harley Quinn ( the Black Vault made her SANE) and Enchantress who have to fight through the asylum , including their Suicide Squad friends to save them.

The Lost Boys #3 (DC Comics) – Star has fled. The Frogg brothers and missing. The Blood Belles have gone rogue and are getting their rampage on! Where’s the popcorn?  This is already better than those crap sequels and it’s still getting good.

Daredevil #14 (Marvel) – Muse gives us a murderous reason to loathe performance art. Blind spot might be going down and Murdock is getting Punisher style angry. Daredevil is about to get dark and real like it was in the 90s!

Inhumans vs. X-Men #1 (Marvel) – Inhumans vs X-men it’s about to go down!!!  Do I really need to say more?

Black #3 (Black Mask Studios) – Kareem is concerned about Juncture and its leadership and Detective Waters is starting to piece together the clues about where Kareem has disappeared to.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Wrath Of The Eternal Warrior #14 (Valiant) – It’s always a shame to see a series come to a close, but I’d much rather it end on a high note than peter off into mediocrity, and Wrath Of The Eternal Warrior has been on an incredible high note lately. I’m entirely comfortable in saying that this was my favorite ongoing series this year, and that’s a hell of a void it’s leaving.

Britannia #4 (Valiant) – A fresh new story comes to a close, and I’ve been loving the arc so far. And with the quality of the physical product, this is well worth your money.

Old Man Logan #15 (Marvel) – Despite a couple of minor missteps this has been a fantastic series. Now that we have Old Man Logan teaming up with the Howling Commandos and fighting vampires? Awesome.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Motor Girl #2 (Abstract Studios) – The first issue blew me away and it’s a series you absolutely need to get. Writer/artist Terry Moore does it again with this new seires featuring a woman who works in a junkyard and many or may not be seeing things like a talking gorilla and a UFO. A weirdly fun series.

Optimus Prime #1 (IDW Publishing) – The post-Revolution Hasbro connected universe kicks off and this series focuses on Optimus and his annexation of Earth as part of the Cybertonian council. It’s a hell of a concept and I’m intrigued to how it will all play out.

Transformers: Lost Light #1 (IDW Publishing) – Again I’m intrigued since this is part of the post-Revolution Hasbro connected universe. The Lost Light has been on its mission to find Cyberutopia for quite some time and I’m intrigued to see how/if this series shifts at all post event.

Rockstars #1 (Image Comics) – A new series by Joe Harris that involves rock and roll, conspiracies, demons, dark gods of rock… sign me up.

Black #3 (Black Mask Studios) – One of the most important comics on the shelves right now.

« Older Entries