Tag Archives: anthony bourdain

Around The Tubes

It’s a new week and we’ve got lots coming your way. To kick things off is our morning roundup of comic news from around the web in our morning roundup.

Vulture – Before He Wanted to Be a Chef, Anthony Bourdain Wanted to Draw Comic Books – For those that might not know. They are solid reads.

CNBC – The story of how comic books became public enemy No. 1 in America’s war on juvenile delinquency – For those who might not know the history.

Bitcoin News – Crypto Manga – Comic Book Series to Spread Cryptocurrency Awareness – Interesting.

 

Reviews

Talking Comics – Batman #48

Comic Mix – The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York

Talking Comics – Dazzler: X-Song #1

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Award Winning Chef and Comic Writer Anthony Bourdain Dead at 61 From Suicide

We don’t usually write obituaries on our site instead covering the news in our morning roundups. Today we awoke to the news that award winning chef Anthony Bourdain has died at age 61. The gifted storyteller who helped open up the world to individuals committed suicide while in France for an an episode of his series Parts Unknown. Bourdain’s gift of storytelling extended beyond television and books to the comic world as he was part of the team behind Get Jiro! and Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi published by DC Comics‘ imprint Vertigo and Hungry Ghosts which is currently being published by Dark Horse.

Bourdain is the second celebrity to take their life this week. Fashion designer Kate Spade ended her life three days ago. Both are reminders that no matter the level of celebrity the issues that can lead to suicide impacts us all.

Nearly 30,000 Americans commit suicide every year and it’s the third leading cause of death for 15 to 23-year-olds and 2nd for 24 to 35-year-olds. On average, 1 person commits suicide every 16.2 minutes and each suicide impacts at least 5 other people. Worldwide one million people commit suicide each ear which is one death every 40 seconds.

But for each of those suicides there are 25 attempted.

If you are contemplating suicide or know someone who might be, there are people who are there to help. If you want to help someone who might be suicidal, BeThe1To has 5 steps that you can use to help a loved one that may be in crisis.

If you are suicidal, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24/7 at 1-800-273-8255 in the United States. Below is a list of other phone numbers from around the world.

  • Argentina: +5402234930430
  • Australia: 131114
  • Austria: 017133374
  • Belgium: 106
  • Bosnia & Herzegovina: 080 05 03 05
  • Botswana: 3911270
  • Brazil: 212339191
  • Canada: 5147234000 (Montreal); 18662773553 (outside Montreal)
  • Croatia: 014833888
  • Denmark: +4570201201
  • Egypt: 7621602
  • Finland: 010 195 202
  • France: 0145394000
  • Germany: 08001810771
  • Holland: 09000767
  • Hong Kong: +852 2382 0000
  • Hungary: 116123
  • India: 8888817666
  • Ireland: +4408457909090
  • Italy: 800860022
  • Japan: +810352869090
  • Mexico: 5255102550
  • New Zealand: 045861048
  • Norway: +4781533300
  • Philippines: 028969191
  • Poland: 5270000
  • Russia: 0078202577577
  • Spain: 914590050
  • South Africa: 0514445691
  • Sweden: 46317112400
  • Switzerland: 143
  • United Kingdom: 08457909090

Every struggle is different. Anyone can be struggling with suicidal thoughts and it is important for them to remember they are not alone. There are people here to help.

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts is Collected in September 2018

Foodies and horror fanatics rejoice! Dark Horse is pleased to reveal that Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts hardcover collection is now available for preorder!

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts features terrifying tales cooked up by the best-selling author and veteran chef, Anthony Bourdain and acclaimed novelist Joel Rose, back again from their New York Times #1 bestseller, Get Jiro!. This collection also contains all-new, original recipes prepared by Bourdain himself, plus a guide to the ghostly legendary spirits behind these horrifying tales.

Inspired by the Japanese Edo Period game Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai or 100 Candles, played by samurai warriors to test their courage, Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts reimagines this classic game of dread and terror as a circle of international chefs invoke modern tales of horror, terrifying yokai, yorei, and obake, all with the common thread of food—and pray that they survive the night.

This horror anthology features art from stellar artists Sebastian Cabrol, Francesco Francavilla, Irene Koh, Leonardo Manco, Alberto Ponticelli, Paul Pope, Vanesa Del Rey, and Mateus Santolouco with fantastic color by Jose Villarrubia, and a drop-dead cover by Paul Pope.

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts goes on sale September 19, 2018.

Review: Hungry Ghosts #1

Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai (The 100 Candles) is a Japanese storytelling game. During the Edo period samurai warriors would occasionally gather for a feast and afterwards they would tell stories of the various ghosts, demons and spirits that inhabit the supernatural landscape of Japan. After each tale the samurai would enter an adjoining room lit by a hundred candles. He would blow one out and stare into a mirror to verify that he had not been possessed before returning to the company of his fellows for another round. As the room grew darker so did the stories. Few of these games, if any, reached completion. Even samurai weren’t that brave.

A modern version of kaidan forms the backbone of Hungry Ghosts, the latest comic by world class chef and world travelling journalist Anthony Bourdain. It’s also the first offering from Berger Books, the new Dark Horse imprint headed by Karen Berger. You may remember her as the visionary editor who oversaw the creation of Vertigo and helped to make some of the best comics ever created (including Neil Gaiman’s Sandman) even better.

Here samurai are replaced by chefs and their stories, derived from Japanese originals, all involve food in some way. The framing device, in which they are gathered under the auspices of a mysterious Russian billionaire, lends weight and a sense of continuity to what would otherwise be simple nightmare-like visions of greed, lust and gluttony: disturbing as they are experienced but apt to vanish like bad dreams when confronted by sunshine.

I won’t discuss the stories themselves as it’s impossible to do so without spoiling them. Needless to say both of the two tales contained in this first issue recall both the Japanese tradition to which they belong and such legendary pre-code horror anthologies as Tales From the Crypt. In any project with more than one writer it’s hard for a reviewer to assess who did what. It is Bourdain’s tastes and concerns that inform the stories culinary focus and the strong threads of social justice that run throughout but, if I understand the back matter correctly, much of the credit for the heavy lifting of transforming his ideas into a viable script for comics is due to co-writer Joel Rose, who also collaborated with Bourdain on his previous graphic novel Get Jiro. Between their combined efforts the legends of Japan are transfigured to reflect the individual cultures of the storytellers themselves (the crew of chefs include French, Hispanic and American cooks as well as Japanese) and the universality of human terror. Of course this opens the book up to charges of cultural appropriation and that’s a fair criticism for anyone who cares to make it. It never felt to me like a crass attempt to exploit Asian traditions by pasting a white mask over a Japanese face solely for the purpose of mass commercial appeal. Your mileage may vary.

As in any good anthology multiple artists are represented. The cover, which you can see at the top of this page, is a stunning and unnerving piece by the masterful Paul Pope. Pope’s work is hit or miss for me but this is certainly one of his better efforts. Alberto Ponticelli and Vanessa Del Rey illustrate the stories themselves, with Ponticelli doing double duty by drawing the framing story as well. Both are a good fit for the material.

Ponticelli has really improved since I first encountered his stuff on Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. His lines seem to be finer and more confident here and there is so much detail packed into the opening splash page of a demon’s boudoir that I will be returning to it many times to explore all the nooks and crannies for hidden treasures. He’s more suited to flat out horror than he is to horror tinged superheroics and I hope he continues to find a work in this vein.

Vanessa Del Rey is a name with which I’m not familiar but she too does an excellent job. Her style reminds me a lot of Becky Cloonan’s, capable of shifting from the voluptuous to the disturbing with surprising ease. It’s similar enough to Ponticelli’s to not be jarring in the transition between the two but different enough that you would never mistake the one for the other.

Sound is a crucial feature in any horror story and one that is hard to approximate in a silent medium like comics. Letterer Sal Cipriano does a great job of jumping this particular hurdle. His captions and balloons are serviceable throughout the first twelve pages, conveying their point without distracting from the art or calling attention to themselves. It’s not until the sound effects begin on page thirteen that he really gets to strut his stuff, varying the size and shape of the same five letters again and again while adding the occasional flourish to illustrate the increasing desperation of the protagonist as something terrible gets closer and closer. The colors by Jose Villaruba (another returning member of Bourdain’s Get Jiro team) tie everything together, painting all the scenes in the same shades and providing a sense of unity that they might otherwise lack.

Hungry Ghosts is  a really fine comic but its not for everyone. As I mentioned above, many readers may take exception to American creators dipping so heavily into the well of Japanese culture. There is also a strong element of sexual violence in the second story that may be distasteful or distressful to some readers. Beyond these concerns the stories themselves are part of an ancient oral tradition that has been translated into the much younger form of comics. While its handled well there are many things that we’ve come to expect in a traditional thirty page comic that are missing from this one. There’s little in the way of character development and the plots are simple constructs that exist to set up a gruesome twist that’s not really a surprise on the final page.

If you’re looking for the kind of rich, character driven horror delivered by books like Hellblazer or Swamp Thing, look elsewhere. If you want a comic that approximates sitting around the campfire on a dark summer night with a bag of marshmallows and a few good friends, trying to scare each other stupid, then I recommend giving Hungry Ghosts a taste.

Story: Anthony Bourdain & Joel Rose Art: Alberto Ponticelli & Vanessa Del Rey
Cover Art: Paul Pope
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: Hungry Ghosts #1

Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai (The 100 Candles) is a Japanese storytelling game. During the Edo period samurai warriors would occasionally gather for a feast and afterwards they would tell stories of the various ghosts, demons and spirits that inhabit the supernatural landscape of Japan. After each tale the samurai would enter an adjoining room lit by a hundred candles. He would blow one out and stare into a mirror to verify that he had not been possessed before returning to the company of his fellows for another round. As the room grew darker so did the stories. Few of these games, if any, reached completion. Even samurai weren’t that brave.

A modern version of kaidan forms the backbone of Hungry Ghosts, the latest comic by world class chef and world travelling journalist Anthony Bourdain. It’s also the first offering from Berger Books, the new Dark Horse imprint headed by Karen Berger. You may remember her as the visionary editor who oversaw the creation of Vertigo and helped to make some of the best comics ever created (including Neil Gaiman’s Sandman) even better.

Here samurai are replaced by chefs and their stories, derived from Japanese originals, all involve food in some way. The framing device, in which they are gathered under the auspices of a mysterious Russian billionaire, lends weight and a sense of continuity to what would otherwise be simple nightmare-like visions of greed, lust and gluttony: disturbing as they are experienced but apt to vanish like bad dreams when confronted by sunshine.

I won’t discuss the stories themselves as it’s impossible to do so without spoiling them. Needless to say both of the two tales contained in this first issue recall both the Japanese tradition to which they belong and such legendary pre-code horror anthologies as Tales From the Crypt. In any project with more than one writer it’s hard for a reviewer to assess who did what. It is Bourdain’s tastes and concerns that inform the stories culinary focus and the strong threads of social justice that run throughout but, if I understand the back matter correctly, much of the credit for the heavy lifting of transforming his ideas into a viable script for comics is due to co-writer Joel Rose, who also collaborated with Bourdain on his previous graphic novel Get Jiro. Between their combined efforts the legends of Japan are transfigured to reflect the individual cultures of the storytellers themselves (the crew of chefs include French, Hispanic and American cooks as well as Japanese) and the universality of human terror. Of course this opens the book up to charges of cultural appropriation and that’s a fair criticism for anyone who cares to make it. It never felt to me like a crass attempt to exploit Asian traditions by pasting a white mask over a Japanese face solely for the purpose of mass commercial appeal. Your mileage may vary.

As in any good anthology multiple artists are represented. The cover, which you can see at the top of this page, is a stunning and unnerving piece by the masterful Paul Pope. Pope’s work is hit or miss for me but this is certainly one of his better efforts. Alberto Ponticelli and Vanessa Del Rey illustrate the stories themselves, with Ponticelli doing double duty by drawing the framing story as well. Both are a good fit for the material.

Ponticelli has really improved since I first encountered his stuff on Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E. His lines seem to be finer and more confident here and there is so much detail packed into the opening splash page of a demon’s boudoir that I will be returning to it many times to explore all the nooks and crannies for hidden treasures. He’s more suited to flat out horror than he is to horror tinged superheroics and I hope he continues to find a work in this vein.

Vanessa Del Rey is a name with which I’m not familiar but she too does an excellent job. Her style reminds me a lot of Becky Cloonan’s, capable of shifting from the voluptuous to the disturbing with surprising ease. It’s similar enough to Ponticelli’s to not be jarring in the transition between the two but different enough that you would never mistake the one for the other.

Sound is a crucial feature in any horror story and one that is hard to approximate in a silent medium like comics. Letterer Sal Cipriano does a great job of jumping this particular hurdle. His captions and balloons are serviceable throughout the first twelve pages, conveying their point without distracting from the art or calling attention to themselves. It’s not until the sound effects begin on page thirteen that he really gets to strut his stuff, varying the size and shape of the same five letters again and again while adding the occasional flourish to illustrate the increasing desperation of the protagonist as something terrible gets closer and closer. The colors by Jose Villaruba (another returning member of Bourdain’s Get Jiro team) tie everything together, painting all the scenes in the same shades and providing a sense of unity that they might otherwise lack.

Hungry Ghosts is  a really fine comic but its not for everyone. As I mentioned above, many readers may take exception to American creators dipping so heavily into the well of Japanese culture. There is also a strong element of sexual violence in the second story that may be distasteful or distressful to some readers. Beyond these concerns the stories themselves are part of an ancient oral tradition that has been translated into the much younger form of comics. While its handled well there are many things that we’ve come to expect in a traditional thirty page comic that are missing from this one. There’s little in the way of character development and the plots are simple constructs that exist to set up a gruesome twist that’s not really a surprise on the final page.

If you’re looking for the kind of rich, character driven horror delivered by books like Hellblazer or Swamp Thing, look elsewhere. If you want a comic that approximates sitting around the campfire on a dark summer night with a bag of marshmallows and a few good friends, trying to scare each other stupid, then I recommend giving Hungry Ghosts a taste.

Story: Anthony Bourdain & Joel Rose Art: Alberto Ponticelli & Vanessa Del Rey
Cover Art: Paul Pope
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose Cook Up Horror in Hungry Ghosts

Prior to San Diego Comic Con 2017, Dark Horse announced the launch titles of Karen Berger’s imprint at Dark Horse. Today, Dark Horse and Berger Books are excited to share art from the upcoming series: Hungry Ghosts!

Author, chef and Emmy award-winning television star Anthony Bourdain and acclaimed writer Joel Rose tell haunting tales of terror, irritable spirits, and horribly strange beings in Hungry Ghosts, a four-issue anthology series of interconnected tales steeped in Japanese legend. Joining them for the first issue are stellar artists Alberto Ponticelli and Vanesa Del Rey, with amazing color by Jose Villarrubia, and a drop-dead cover by Paul Pope. Subsequent issues will feature art from Francesco Francavilla, Leonardo Manco, Paul Pope, Mateus Santolouco, and others.

Inspired by the Japanese Edo Period game Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai or 100 Candles, played by samurai warriors to test their courage, Hungry Ghosts reimagines this classic game of dread and terror as a circle of international chefs invoke modern tales of horror, terrifying yokaiyorei, and obake, all with the common thread of food—and pray that they survive the night. For the first course, with bad consequence, a ramen chef refuses to help a beggar, and a band of pirates gets more (and less) than they were bargaining for after their encounter with a drowning woman turns ghastly.

The first issue goes on sale January 31, 2018.

Berger Books Details Revealed

In early 2017, Dark Horse announced Berger Books, a new line of creator-owned comic books and graphic novels, from Karen Berger, the legendary, award-winning comic book editor and founder of DC Comics’ influential imprint Vertigo. Today, Dark Horse has revealed the new imprint’s premiere titles. Berger Books will release four new comics series, each to be later collected as a graphic novel: Hungry Ghosts by Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose; Incognegro: Renaissance by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece; Mata Hari by Emma Beeby and Ariela Kristantina, and The Seeds by Ann Nocenti and David Aja. Berger Books will also publish a tenth-anniversary edition of Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery by Mat Johnson and Warren Pleece and The Originals: The Essential Edition by Dave Gibbons.

Author, chef and Emmy award-winning television star Anthony Bourdain and acclaimed writer Joel Rose tell haunting tales of terror, irritable spirits, and horribly strange beings in Hungry Ghosts, a four-issue anthology series including art by Vanesa Del Rey, Leo Manco, Alberto Ponticelli, Paul Pope, and Mateus Santolouco. Inspired by the Japanese Edo Period game Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai or 100 Candles, played by samurai warriors to test their courage, Hungry Ghosts reimagines this classic game of dread and terror as a circle of international chefs invoke modern tales of horror, terrifying yokai, yorei, and obake, all with the common thread of food. Hungry Ghosts #1 goes on sale January 31, 2018.

Acclaimed novelist Mat Johnson  and veteran artist Warren Pleece reunite for Incognegro: Renaissance, a new prequel series that follows cub reporter Zane Pinchback through the glittering nightlife of the Harlem Renaissance as he goes undercover, passing as white, for the first time. The first issue (of five) goes on sale February 7, 2018. This new series is a perfect companion to the tenth-anniversary edition of the 2008 Vertigo graphic novel, Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery. Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery features enhanced toned art, an afterword by Mat Johnson, character sketches, and other additional material. Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery finds Zane Pinchback, a reporter for the New York-based New Holland Herald, sent to investigate the arrest of his own brother, charged with the brutal murder of a white woman in Mississippi. With a lynch mob already swarming, Zane must stay “incognegro” long enough to uncover the truth behind the murder in order to save his brother—and himself. Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery goes on sale February 6, 2018, and is available for preorder on Amazon, Penguin Random House, and at your local comic shop.

Breakout talent, writer Emma Beeby and artist Ariela Kristantina join together for a new five-issue series based on the controversial and historical figure, Mata Hari. Mata Hari is notorious as the original “stripper-spy”: exotic dancer, convicted double agent, and femme fatale. Executed by a French firing squad in 1917, many have since questioned the conviction. A century after her death, Mata Hari tells her story through fictional diary excerpts, drawn from biographies of the real woman whose past has been shrouded in mystery by both the lies of her accusers and the outlandish stories she told about herself. The first issue of Mata Hari goes on sale February 21, 2018.

Award-winning artist David Aja and filmmaker, journalist and writer Ann Nocenti team up for The Seeds, a new four-issue series. In an imminent America where fact-based reporting is gasping its last breath, an idealistic journalist stumbles into the story of a lifetime, only to realize that she can’t report it. Instead, she has to pitch the biggest myth of her career. An eco-fiction tech-thriller where flora and fauna have begun to mutate, The Seeds is also a story of love beyond race and gender, and of the resilience of both human and animal kind. The first issue of The Seeds goes on sale March 28, 2018.

The Originals: The Essential Edition is an oversized new edition of Vertigo’s 2004 Eisner award-winning graphic novel from comics legend, Dave Gibbons. In a retro-futuristic city of industrial gray where hover scooters, music, and drugs rule the street, The Originals are the toughest, most stylish gang around. For two childhood friends, nothing is more important than being one of them, but being part of the crowd will bring its own deadly consequences. This new edition includes 32 pages of never-before-seen development art, process pieces, and behind the scenes extras—all annotated by Gibbons. The Originals: The Essential Edition goes on sale April 18, 2018.

Anthony Bourdain’s Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi out in October from Vertigo

Vertigo, the imprint of DC Entertainment, announced it will release a prequel to 2012’s Get Jiro! from renowned chef and  New York Times bestselling author Anthony Bourdain along with co-writer Joel Rose, interior artist Alé Garza, and cover artist Dave Johnson. Reminiscent of a Yakuza action movie, Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi is set in Tokyo and tells the story of how Jiro’s two worlds collided as he worked for his father’s mob, yet pursued his love of cooking at night to become a chef.

In a release, Bourdain said:

Where did my ultra-violent sushi chef hero from the previous book come from? What if you were brought up in a family where murder is acceptable practice and making the best sushi on the planet is a shameful secret? I wanted to take the story back to its beginnings–in Japan (albeit a slightly-in-the-future, dystopic Japan), and indulge my own enthusiasms for both the place and the many classic genre films that have been made there. This is fun for me.

Co-writer Joel Rose added:

Tony and I wanted to revisit Jiro and go back to his origins. We took as our inspiration classic yakuza movies, Ichi the Killer, Battle Without Honor or Humanity, and a slew more. We were also looking for an artist with the chops to do the manga we saw as the book’s style, and thus, Alé Garza. We are thrilled to be back and can’t wait for fans to pick up the book.

Artist Alé Garza said:

When I was approached to work on the Get Jiro! prequel I was giddy with excitement! The idea of getting to create something with Anthony Bourdain was just so overwhelming. I also knew that I’d have to push myself harder creatively. Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi, has been just that, a creative push forward for myself as an artist. I’m doing my best to create an emotionally compelling world that fits suit with the previously released book. It’s really unlike any thing I’ve ever taken on.

Get Jiro: Blood and Sushi will hit shelves and be available for digital download on October 20, 2015. The original graphic novel will be 160 pages and available for $22.99.

Get Jiro.finalcover

Review: Get Jiro!

GETJ_COVER_0The schools of culinary thought have always been divided but not as boldly as they are in Get Jiro! – an action thriller that takes America’s newfound obsession with exotic cuisine to a manic, violent extreme.

C0-Written by renowned chef Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose, Get Jiro! is set in a not-too-distant future Los Angeles, where master chefs rule like crime lords and people literally kill for a seat at the best restaurants. It’s a world where food and the secrets of how to prepare it are the source of all power. This is a stylized send-up of food culture and society. The art is provided by Langdon Foss.

I missed this graphic novel the first time around, but with the release of it in trade paperback, it’s a perfect opportunity to see what everyone has been raving about and what I missed.

The story is a foodie comic geek’s dream with inside jokes and a send-up of food culture and the various sects it has sprung. In this story, the power is split between two powers, the “Internationalists,” who blend foods from all over the world into exotic delights or the “Vertical Farm,” who prepare nothing but organic, vegetarian, macrobiotic dishes. Both sides want the talented sushi chef Jiro to join their side.

What I enjoyed most is the lampooning of food culture, calling out some of the hypocrisy and showing how much the use of pop words has tip-toed into the industry and how some people live and die by them.

Then there’s the crazy action. The comic is a bloody, over the top, bloody and hilarious. The story is unlike anything else out there, blending food with something I’d expect out of a Tarantino movie. To say it goes in a completely different direction than I expected, is a bit of an understatement.

I found myself pouring through the graphic novel, reading it in one sitting. The story is original. The story is funny. The story is entertaining. For something different, this is a definite buy.

Story: Anthony Bourdain and Joel Rose Art: Langdon Foss
Story: 8.25 Art: 8 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics and Vertigo provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Anthony Bourdain Gets Graphic


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Anthony BourdainAnthony Bourdain is working on a graphic novel with DC comics.  The graphic novel is about “ultraviolent food nerds” (isn’t that Chew?!).  The graphic novel is right now titled Get Gyro.

In various interviews he’s had already about the project he’s described it as:

It’s about ultraviolent food nerds. It’s a gourmet slaughterfest, sort of like Fistful of Dollars meets Eat Drink Man Woman.

and

I describe it as Yojimbo meets Big Night and Babette’s Feast, an ultra-violent slaughter-fest over culinary arcana.

Um, k then….